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Soldiers With Blast Injuries Suffer Pituitary Hormone Problems

Soldiers With Blast Injuries Suffer Pituitary Hormone Problems | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Soldiers who suffered TBI as a result of an IED blast are more likely to have pituitary hormone problems than patients with TBI caused by accidents, a new study suggests.
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Harvard Unveils MRI Study Proving Meditation Literally Rebuilds The Brain’s Gray Matter In 8 Weeks

Harvard Unveils MRI Study Proving Meditation Literally Rebuilds The Brain’s Gray Matter In 8 Weeks | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Test subjects taking part in an 8-week program of mindfulness meditation showed results that astonished even the most experienced neuroscientists at Harvard University.  The study was led by a Harvard-affiliated team of researchers based at Massachusetts General Hospital, and the team’s MRI scans documented for the very first time in medical history how meditation produced massive changes inside the brain’s gray matter.  “Although the practice of meditation is associated with a sense of peacefulness and physical relaxation, practitioners have long claimed that meditation also provides cognitive and psychological benefits that persist throughout the day,” says study senior author Sara Lazar of the MGH Psychiatric Neuroimaging Research Program and a Harvard Medical School instructor in psychology. “This study demonstrates that changes in brain structure may underlie some of these reported improvements and that people are not just feeling better because they are spending time relaxing.”

 

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Paleo for Women | The GABA Neurotransmitter: Another Link Between Diet, Hormones, Mental Health, and Sleep

Paleo for Women | The GABA Neurotransmitter: Another Link Between Diet, Hormones, Mental Health, and Sleep | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The GABA Neurotransmitter: Another Link Between Diet, Hormones, Mental Health, and Sleep http://t.co/qF3uAK9993
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Stroke damage mechanism identified

Stroke damage mechanism identified | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have discovered a mechanism linked to the brain damage often suffered by stroke victims–and are now searching for drugs to block it.
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Mindfulness treatment as effective as CBT for depression and anxiety

Mindfulness treatment as effective as CBT for depression and anxiety | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Group mindfulness treatment is as effective as individual cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in patients with depression and anxiety, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden and Region Skåne.
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Scientists use Harry Potter to find how our brain allow us to understand stories - Daily Mail

Scientists use Harry Potter to find how our brain allow us to understand stories - Daily Mail | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans of eight people as they read a chapter of a Potter book.
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How To Use Music To Boost Athletic Performance — PsyBlog

How To Use Music To Boost Athletic Performance — PsyBlog | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Research reveals which types of music improve which types of athletic performance. 
Listening to jazz can improve your performance on the putting green, according to a new study. And jazz is not the only music that’s been linked to athletic performance, as one of the study’s authors Dr. Ali Boolani explains: “Other research has shown that country music improves batting, rap music improves jump shots and running is improved by any up-tempo music. But the benefit of music in fine motor control situations was relatively unknown. Hopefully, this is the first step in answering this question.”
In the small experiment, 20 good golfers tried five different putts while listening to one of the following types of music:


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Pain in a dish: Researchers turn skin cells into pain sensing neurons

Pain in a dish: Researchers turn skin cells into pain sensing neurons | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
After more than six years of intensive effort, and repeated failures that made the quest at times seem futile, Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers at Boston Children's Hospital (BCH) and Harvard's Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative...
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How Did Brains Evolve?

How Did Brains Evolve? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Humans have asked where we come from for thousands of years, across all cultures.
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Music’s Amazing Effect on Long-Term Memory and Mental Abilities In General

Music’s Amazing Effect on Long-Term Memory and Mental Abilities In General | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The fascinating effect of music on people’s cognitive abilities.

Professional musicians show superior long-term memory compared with non-musicians, a new study finds.

Their brains are also capable of much faster neural responses in key areas of the brain related to decision-making, memory and attention.

The results were presented at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in Washington, DC (Schaeffer et al., 2014).

Professional musicians show superior long-term memory compared with non-musicians, a new study finds.


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Dopamine leaves its mark in brain scans

Dopamine leaves its mark in brain scans | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify which areas of the brain are active during specific tasks.
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Damage to brain networks affects stroke recovery

Damage to brain networks affects stroke recovery | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—Initial results of an innovative study may significantly change how some patients are evaluated after a stroke, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
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Body's bacteria may keep our brains healthy and the blood-brain barrier intact

Body's bacteria may keep our brains healthy and the blood-brain barrier intact | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The microbes that live in your body outnumber your cells 10 to one. Recent studies suggest these tiny organisms help us digest food and maintain our immune system. Now, researchers have discovered yet another way microbes keep us healthy: They are needed for closing the blood-brain barrier, a molecular fence that shuts out pathogens and molecules that could harm the brain.


The findings suggest that a woman's diet or exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy may influence the development of this barrier. The work could also lead to a better understanding of multiple sclerosis, in which a leaky blood-brain barrier may set the stage for a decline in brain function.


The first evidence that bacteria may help fortify the body’s biological barriers came in 2001. Researchers discovered that microbes in the gut activate genes that code for gap junction proteins, which are critical to building the gut wall. Without these proteins, gut pathogens can enter the bloodstream and cause disease.


In the new study, intestinal biologist Sven Pettersson and his postdoc Viorica Braniste of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm decided to look at the blood-brain barrier, which also has gap junction proteins. They tested how leaky the blood-brain barrier was in developing and adult mice. Some of the rodents were brought up in a sterile environment and thus were germ-free, with no detectable microbes in their bodies. Braniste then injected antibodies—which are too big to get through the blood-brain barrier—into embryos developing within either germ-free moms or moms with the typical microbes, or microbiota.


The studies showed that the blood-brain barrier typically forms a tight seal a little more than 17 days into development. Antibodies infiltrated the brains of all the embryos younger than 17 days, but they continued to enter the brains of embryos of germ-free mothers well beyond day 17, the team reports online today in Science Translational Medicine. Embryos from germ-free mothers also had fewer intact gap junction proteins, and gap junction protein genes in their brains were less active, which may explain the persistent leakiness.


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Vloasis's curator insight, November 22, 11:04 AM

So basically, embryos from germ-free mothers did not develop as efficiently, or as well?

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3-D deep-imaging advance likely to drive new biological insights

3-D deep-imaging advance likely to drive new biological insights | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

In a significant technical advance, a team of neuroscientists at The Rockefeller University has devised a fast, inexpensive imaging method for probing the molecular intricacies of large biological samples in three dimensions, an achievement that could have far reaching implications in a wide array of basic biological investigations.

The new method, called iDISCO, optimizes techniques for deep tissue immunolabeling and combines them with recent technological innovations in tissue clearing and light sheet microscopy to achieve unprecedented deep labeling and imaging of molecular structures in the brain, the kidney, and other organs and tissues in experimental settings. A detailed report on iDISCO is published in the November 6 issue of the journal Cell.

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Secret of tetanus toxicity offers new way to treat motor neuron disease

Secret of tetanus toxicity offers new way to treat motor neuron disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The way that tetanus neurotoxin enters nerve cells has been discovered by UCL scientists, who showed that this process can be blocked, offering a potential therapeutic intervention for tetanus.
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Brain Scans Show Abnormalities in Chronic Fatigue Patients : DNews

Brain Scans Show Abnormalities in Chronic Fatigue Patients : DNews | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Brains of people who experience chronic fatigue are different than those of people who don't. Continue reading →
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What is traumatic brain injury and how is it treated?

What is traumatic brain injury and how is it treated? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Life-threatening brain injuries are thankfully rare in cricket and other sports, even those that involve collisions. But Australian cricketer Phillip Hughes’ tragic accident yesterday shows how little control players have over these events.
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‘Trigger’ for stress processes discovered in the brain

‘Trigger’ for stress processes discovered in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
At the Center for Brain Research at the MedUni Vienna an important factor for stress has been identified in collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm (Sweden).
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Neuroscience Online: An Electronic Textbook for the Neurosciences | University of Texas Medical School at Houston

Welcome to Neuroscience Online, the Open-Access Neuroscience Electronic Textbook.

This online, interactive courseware for the study of neuroscience is provided by the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy atThe University of Texas Medical School at Houston. The project is being developed under the direction of the Department Chair and Editor, John H. Byrne.

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Neuroalgorithmicmedia - How algorithmic bidding in paid search mirrors how the human brain makes decisions.

Neuroalgorithmicmedia - How algorithmic bidding in paid search mirrors how the human brain makes decisions. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The human brain is the most advanced super computer in the universe, with over 100 billion neurons responsible for every conscious and subconscious decision/ action we make. It is hypothesized by some neuroscientists that the decisions we make are nothing more than the rate in which neurons fire within specific parts of our brain. Studies have demonstrated that the decisions we make are, in great part, executed within the orbitofrontal cortex. This is the brain’s decision engine. The decision process is influenced by a risk assessment and a reward assessment. The risk assessment modulated by the amygdala and the reward assessment modulated by the nucleus accumbens. The decision making process in our brains is quite a bit more complicated than the above, but for the most part these are the regions of our brains that modulate and carry out our decisions.

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Cuddlers, Rejoice! Science Proves That Sleeping With Someone Else Is Good For Your Health

Cuddlers, Rejoice! Science Proves That Sleeping With Someone Else Is Good For Your Health | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Basically science is telling us something we already knew: one really is the loneliest number.
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Dominant people can be surprisingly social

Dominant people can be surprisingly social | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In contrast to the lay stereotype, dominant people prove to be avid social learners, just like dominant individuals in the animal kingdom.
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Bee brains offer insights into how human memories form

Bee brains offer insights into how human memories form | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—University of Queensland scientists have discovered that genes switch off as memories are being formed, allowing for new connections between nerve cells.
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Stress reaction may be in your dad's DNA, study finds

Stress reaction may be in your dad's DNA, study finds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Stress in this generation could mean resilience in the next, a new study suggests.
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Johns Hopkins scientists present findings at the Society for Neuroscience meeting | Science Codex

Nanosymposium 18.10 Sat., 3:15 p.m., Walter E. Washington Convention Center, 150A Lindsay Hayes and Akira Sawa A Blood Pressure Hormone Implicated in Psychosis
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