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Program - RNA Metabolism in Neurological Disease, 8th Brain Research Conference, USA, 2013

Program - RNA Metabolism in Neurological Disease, 8th Brain Research Conference, USA, 2013 | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The 8th Brain Research Conference will bring together basic and clinical scientists to discuss the role of perturbed RNA metabolism in neurological diseases. Visit the website to know more.
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Gene linked to long life also protects against mental decline in old age

Gene linked to long life also protects against mental decline in old age | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Discovery gives scientists hope of developing a therapy that could slowdown the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia People who carry a mutated gene linked to longer lifespan have extra tissue in part of the brain that...
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from the plastic brain
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Monkeys' amygdala neurons are important in guiding behaviour toward internally generated distant goals

Nature Neuroscience | doi:10.1038/nn.3925

 

Working with monkeys, researchers conclude that "neuronal planning activity in the amygdala suggests that this structure is important in guiding behaviour toward internally generated, distant goals."


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Appraisal of stressful or threatening situations by the brain

Appraisal of stressful or threatening situations by the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Research Center Translational Neurosciences of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have advanced a generalized concept as the basis for future studies of mental resilience.
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Shedding new light on the formation of emotional fear memories | RIKEN

Shedding new light on the formation of emotional fear memories | RIKEN | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Everyday events are easy to forget, but unpleasant ones can remain engraved in the brain. A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences identifies a neural mechanism through which unpleasant experiences are translated into signals that trigger fear memories by changing neural connections in a part of the brain called the amygdala. The findings show that a long-standing theory on how the brain forms memories, called Hebbian plasticity, is partially correct, but not as simple as was originally proposed.

 

Summary from Learning & the Brain Society Newsletter - January 2015:

Shedding new light on the formation of emotional fear memories 

RIKEN Brain Science Institute

 

Everyday events are easy to forget, but unpleasant ones can remain engraved in the brain. A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences identifies a neural mechanism through which unpleasant experiences are translated into signals that trigger fear memories by changing neural connections in a part of the brain called the amygdala. The findings show that a long-standing theory on how the brain forms memories, called Hebbian plasticity, is partially correct, but not as simple as was originally proposed.


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Study finds traumatic brain injury treatment is ineffective

Study finds traumatic brain injury treatment is ineffective | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
More than 1.7 million people in the U.S. alone suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) every year, often resulting in permanent disabilities or death.
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Why should adolescents with psychological symptoms be asked about hallucinations?

Why should adolescents with psychological symptoms be asked about hallucinations? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Visual distortions and hallucinations related to an elevated risk of psychosis are linked to self-destructive thought processes among adolescents with psychological symptoms, tells the recent study conducted at the Helsinki University Hospital,...
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Limitless learning Universe
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Blood Work: Scientists Uncover Surprising New Tools to Rejuvenate the Brain | ucsf.edu

Blood Work: Scientists Uncover Surprising New Tools to Rejuvenate the Brain | ucsf.edu | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
RT @UCSF: Interested in #aging/longevity #science? Join our @reddit r/Science AMA on 1/28. Background: http://t.co/YuiMltlnvo http://t.co/v…;

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The brain's electrical alphabet

The brain's electrical alphabet | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The brain's alphabet is a mix of rate and precise timing of electrical pulses: the observation was made by researchers at the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) of Trieste and the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT) of Rovereto,...
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from LeadershipABC
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The Neuroscience Of Being A Good Leader

The Neuroscience Of Being A Good Leader | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Find out why it's important for leaders to understand how people feel about the freedom they have and their relationships at work.


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Charlotte Hitchcock's curator insight, January 24, 4:11 AM

Excellent article. More managers need to be aware of the negative impact of "micromanaging "  on their teams

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Expansion Microscopy Stretches Limits of Conventional Microscopes

Expansion Microscopy Stretches Limits of Conventional Microscopes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new technique makes minute biological features, some just 70 nanometers wide, more visible through regular optical microscopes.
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Could an insulin nasal spray help treat Alzheimer's?

Could an insulin nasal spray help treat Alzheimer's? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A manufactured form of long-acting insulin - delivered nasally - has been shown to improve working memory in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.
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Men and Women Process Emotions in Different Ways: This Affects What They Remember — PsyBlog

Men and Women Process Emotions in Different Ways: This Affects What They Remember — PsyBlog | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Study of 3,000+ finds men and women process emotions differently and this affects what they remember. 

Women rate emotional images as more stimulating and are more likely to remember them than men, a new study finds.

While strong emotions tend to boost memory for both men and women, this neuroimaging study may help explain why women often outperform men on memory tests.

The results come from a very large study of 3,398 people who took part in four different trials.

Both men and women were asked to look at a series of pictures, some of which were emotionally arousing and others which were neutral.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, January 23, 8:16 AM

The results, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, showed that women found the emotional pictures — and especially the negative pictures — more stimulating than the men...

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and HealthCare
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Study: Therapeutic empathy and recovery from depression in cognitive-behavioral therapy: a structural equation model

Study: Therapeutic empathy and recovery from depression in cognitive-behavioral therapy: a structural equation model | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
This study demonstrated that therapeutic empathy has a moderate-to-large causal effect on recovery from depression in a group of 185 patients treated with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT).


The authors simultaneously estimated the reciprocal effect of depression severity on therapeutic empathy and found that this effect was quite small. In addition, homework compliance had a separate effect on clinical recovery, over and above the effect of therapeutic empathy.


The patients of novice therapists improved significantly less than did the patients of more experienced therapists, when controlling for therapeutic empathy and homework compliance. Ss who terminated therapy prematurely were less likely to complete the self-help assignments between sessions, rated their therapists as significantly less empathic, and improved significantly less.


Ss with borderline personality disorder improved significantly less, but they rated their therapists as just as empathic and caring as other patients. The significance of these findings for psychotherapy research, treatment, and clinical training is discussed.


image http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depression_(mood)


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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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Feedback and Emotions in the Trust Game

Feedback and Emotions in the Trust GameWe conduct an experiment on the impact of feedback in the Trust Game. In our treatment group, the Trustee has the opportunity to give feedback to the Investor (free in choice of wording and contents). The feedback option is found to reduce the share of Investors who sent no resources to the Trustee, while the impact on average behavior is less pronounced. The notion proposed by Xiao and Houser (2005, PNAS) according to which verbal feedback and monetary sanctions are substitutes is not supported. We use the PANAS-scale (Mackinnon et al., 1999) to capture change in subjects’ short-run affective state during the experiment. Receiving feedback has an impact on the Investors’ short-run affective state but giving feedback is not found to have an effect on Trustees’ short-run affective state.   


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Planning may start in brain's emotion centre

Planning may start in brain's emotion centre | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
An almond-shaped clusters of neurons deep in the brain known as the amygdala may play a vital part in long-term planning, suggests a new study.

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Brain Stimulation Induces Feelings Of Extreme Thirst In Mice

Brain Stimulation Induces Feelings Of Extreme Thirst In Mice | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
By directing pulses of light onto specific regions of the brain, researchers from Columbia University Medical Center induced feelings of extreme thirst in perfectly well hydrated mice — causing them to drink the equivalent of seven pints of water...
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Intracranial stimulation proved efficient in the recovery of learning and memory in rats

Intracranial stimulation proved efficient in the recovery of learning and memory in rats | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Stimulation of the hypothalamus completely reverses learning and memory deficits caused by brain lesions in rats, according to a first time discovery by a group of researchers led by the UAB.
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Magnetic Stimulation May Halt Rumination in Depression

Magnetic Stimulation May Halt Rumination in Depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Transcranial magnetic stimulation could correct faulty connectivity
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Warped Brain Lobes Could Underlie Depression Symptoms

Warped Brain Lobes Could Underlie Depression Symptoms | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Wraparound occipital lobes found to be highly common in depression
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists map brains of the blind to solve mysteries of human brain specialization

Scientists map brains of the blind to solve mysteries of human brain specialization | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Studying the brain activity of blind people, scientists are challenging the standard view of how the human brain specializes to perform different kinds of tasks, and shedding new light on how our brains can adapt to the rapid cultural and...
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Contemplative Neuroscience
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The Mindfulness and Compassion | The Art and Science of Contemplative Practice

The Mindfulness and Compassion | The Art and Science of Contemplative Practice | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Second Int. Conference on Mindfulness

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Dave Vago's curator insight, January 23, 12:09 PM

Looks like a great group - should be fun

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Vernon B. Mountcastle, Brain Explorer, Dies at 96

Vernon B. Mountcastle, Brain Explorer, Dies at 96 | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
At the dawn of modern neuroscience, Dr. Mountcastle showed how cylinders of neurons, dedicated to specific tasks, work together to process perception.
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How the Brain Stores Trivial Memories, Just in Case

How the Brain Stores Trivial Memories, Just in Case | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The new research suggests that human memory keeps sights, sounds and observations in cold storage for a time in case they become useful later on.
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Study identifies part of brain key to controlling attention

Study identifies part of brain key to controlling attention | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
For the first time, researchers have convincingly identified an ensemble of neurons in the brain that is crucial to focusing attention and ignoring distractions.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from leapmind
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Eight genes that make us brainiacs

Eight genes that make us brainiacs | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Study identifies DNA that boosts size of memory and motor control centers in brain


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