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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Nanoparticles Improve Stroke Treatment

Nanoparticles Improve Stroke Treatment | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Currently there is just one drug that has been approved for treatment of acute stroke—recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, or t-PA. Essentially it works by thinning blood clots. Researchers at the University of Georgia (UGA) announced last week that they have developed a magnetic nanoparticle that when combined with t-PA can make the drug significantly more effective.

The Georgia researchers injected magnetic nanorods into the bloodstream. When stimulated by rotating magnets the nanorods act as a kind of mixing tool that shakes up blood clots that have already been thinned by t-PA.

The injected nanorods "act like stirring bars to drive t-PA to the site of the clot," said Yiping Zhao, professor of physics at UGA, in a press release. "Our preliminary results show that the breakdown of clots can be enhanced up to twofold compared to treatment with t-PA alone."


Via Alin Velea
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Brain Images: New Techniques And Bright Colors

Brain Images: New Techniques And Bright Colors | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
These 12 images show some of the cutting-edge techniques that scientists are using to try to solve the mystery of the brain.
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Cognitive test can differentiate between Alzheimer's and normal aging

Cognitive test can differentiate between Alzheimer's and normal aging | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Researchers have developed a new cognitive test that can better determine whether memory impairments are due to very mild Alzheimer’s disease or the normal aging process. Their study appears in the journal Neuropsychologia.


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A Simple Experiment in Empathy

A Simple Experiment in Empathy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

 by Peter Himmelman

I decide to conduct an experiment, a simple experiment in empathy. I ask myself, is it possible, in spite of how insane and dead-wrong this storeowner is, that I could -- in some way -- begin to empathize with him? Just before bed, I write a list of how I imagine he might be seeing the issue -- and at first, it's physically painful to write:


1. Though I totally disagree with his policy and his intransigent stance, I must also admit that I don't know a damn thing about running a store.


============================
After the phone call I feel like a tiny tear
in the fabric of my own humanity has
been restored. All through this
simple experiment in empathy....

============


Via Edwin Rutsch
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How the brain stabilizes its connections in order to learn better

How the brain stabilizes its connections in order to learn better | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Throughout our lives, our brains adapt to what we learn and memorize. The brain is indeed made up of complex networks of neurons and synapses that are constantly re-configured.


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LOr's curator insight, July 21, 5:15 PM
découverte d'un rôle des astrocytes
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Scientists find new clues to brain's wiring

Scientists find new clues to brain's wiring | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research provides an intriguing glimpse into the processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain.
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After age 25, we're more forgetful when we're distracted - Futurity

After age 25, we're more forgetful when we're distracted - Futurity | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Older people are nearly twice as likely as young adults to have their memory affected by distractions like irrelevant speech or written words. (After the age of 25, we're more forgetful when...where was I ?
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The Empathy Mirror

Empathy has been difficult for neuroscientists to analyze because it’s the product of many parts of the brain acting with one another in mysterious ways.


Simon Baron-Cohen, a neuroscientist and psychologist at the University of Oxford, has identified ten separate regions of the brain, each with its own special function, that comprise the “empathy circuit.” One critical part of this circuit is called the medial prefrontal cortex, or MPFC, which plays a role in comparing one’s own perspective to that of others. Other parts of the empathy circuit correlate with social judgments (the orbitofrontal cortex), awareness of the intentions and goals of others (the frontal operculum), recognizing emotion (the inferior frontal gyrus), and processing sensory stimuli (the somatosensory cortex).


But knowing which brain areas are associated with which individual functions still doesn’t present a clear picture of how these areas work, much less interact with one another.


by Andrew Price

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You’d Be Happier If You Talked to Strangers More Often

You’d Be Happier If You Talked to Strangers More Often | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Humans are some of the most social creatures on this planet, but step into an elevator, train or public bus and something strange happens: we fall silent, stare at the wall and ignore the strangers surrounding us.
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Can An Eye Test Predict Alzheimer's? Scientists Unveil New Vision Scans

Can An Eye Test Predict Alzheimer's? Scientists Unveil New Vision Scans | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
An eye test to detect Alzheimer's disease? New technology may reveal brain disease years before symptoms develop, scientists say.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Realizing Empathy, Part 1: Art

Realizing Empathy, Part 1: Art | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Empathy is a curious, human capacity that pervades the worlds of both art and design. In this article, the first of a three-part series, author Seung Chan Lim (Slim) explores the direct relationship between making art and realizing empathy.

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Social Touch Brain Pathways

Social Touch Brain Pathways | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New social touch brain pathways have been discovered that directly link gentle social stroking to the emotional centers in the brain.
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19 video talks on migraine & mathematics

19 video talks on migraine & mathematics | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
We had a workshop on “Cortical Spreading Depression (CSD) and Related Neurological Phenomena” at the Fields Institute in Toronto, Canada. All talks are available online here.
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The dopamine transporter: Researchers study a common link between addiction and neurological disease

The dopamine transporter: Researchers study a common link between addiction and neurological disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Recent published research in the Journal of Clinical Investigation demonstrates how changes in dopamine signaling and dopamine transporter function are linked to neurological and psychiatric diseases, including early-onset Parkinsonism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
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Eye movement when reading could be an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease

Eye movement when reading could be an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Researchers have suggested that alterations in eye movements when reading could be linked to impairments in working memory and an early indication of Alzheimer’s disease according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical and Experimental...


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Chattering brain cells hold the key to the language of the mind - PsyPost

Chattering brain cells hold the key to the language of the mind - PsyPost | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

“By Kate Jeffery, University College London Let’s say Martians land on the Earth and wish to understand more about humans.”


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Eye Movements Reveal Difference Between Love And Lust

Eye Movements Reveal Difference Between Love And Lust | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Soul singer Betty Everett once proclaimed, “If you want to know if he loves you so, it’s in his kiss.” But a new study by University of Chicago researchers suggests the difference between love and lust might be in the eyes after all. Specifically, where your date looks at you could indicate whether love or…

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Love Is in the Gaze: An Eye-Tracking Study of Love and Sexual Desire

Love Is in the Gaze: An Eye-Tracking Study of Love and Sexual Desire | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Reading other people’s eyes is a valuable skill during interpersonal interaction. Although a number of studies have investigated visual patterns in relation to the perceiver’s interest, intentions, and goals, little is known about eye gaze when it comes to differentiating intentions to love from intentions to lust (sexual desire). To address this question, we conducted two experiments: one testing whether the visual pattern related to the perception of love differs from that related to lust and one testing whether the visual pattern related to the expression of love differs from that related to lust. Our results show that a person’s eye gaze shifts as a function of his or her goal (love vs. lust) when looking at a visual stimulus. Such identification of distinct visual patterns for love and lust could have theoretical and clinical importance in couples therapy when these two phenomena are difficult to disentangle from one another on the basis of patients’ self-reports.

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Antipsychotic drugs linked to slight decrease in brain volume

Antipsychotic drugs linked to slight decrease in brain volume | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A study published today has confirmed a link between antipsychotic medication and a slight, but measureable, decrease in brain volume in patients with schizophrenia.
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SIX SECONDS HIGH: neurosciencestuff: Experts urge new discipline...

SIX SECONDS HIGH: neurosciencestuff: Experts urge new discipline... | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
neurosciencestuff:
“Experts urge new discipline combining benefits of neuroscience and psychology treatments
When a patient talks with a psychological therapist, what changes occur in the patient’s...
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What's so funny? Deconstructing Humor

What's so funny? Deconstructing Humor | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The laughter spills out of her like a jar of coins enriching the nearby
surroundings. How does this burst of vocalized joy, unique in this form
only to our species, define our personalities and impact our social
relationships? A recent study of humor in children explains where the funny
bone is: your brain. 
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Sexy Scents? | Psychology Today

Sexy Scents? | Psychology Today | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists have discovered that the human nose possesses receptors for chemical scents called pheromones, which are bodily chemicals that regulate mating and other social behaviors in insects and (nonhuman) mammalian species.
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» The Neuroscience of Addictive Love: Attributes of Love Addiction - Neuroscience and Relationships

» The Neuroscience of Addictive Love: Attributes of Love Addiction - Neuroscience and Relationships | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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The Custom-Made Brain: Cerebral Plasticity, Regeneration, and Enhancement (by Jean-Didier Vincent & Pierre-Marie Lledo)

The Custom-Made Brain: Cerebral Plasticity, Regeneration, and Enhancement

~ Pierre-Marie Lledo (author) More about this product
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Two leading neuroscientists introduce the concepts of "cerebral plasticity" and the "regenerating brain," describing what we know now about the processes through which the brain constantly reconstructs itself and the potential benefits this knowledge could have in addressing concerns for neurological, cognitive, and emotional health.

The authors begin with a survey of the fundamental scientific developments that led to our current understanding of the regenerative mind, elucidating the breakthrough neurobiological studies that paved the way for our present understanding of the brain's plasticity and regenerative capabilities. They then discuss the application of these findings to such issues as depression, dyslexia, schizophrenia, and cognitive therapy, incorporating the latest technologies in neuroimaging, optogenetics, and nanotechnology. Their work shows the brain is anything but a static organ, ceasing to grow as human beings become adults. Rather, the brain is dynamic, evolving organically in relation to physical, cultural, historical, and affective stimuli, a plasticity that provides early hope to survivors of trauma and degenerative disorders.

 

 


Via Complexity Digest, Ashish Umre
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Researchers examine how touch can trigger our emotions

Researchers examine how touch can trigger our emotions | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
While touch always involves awareness, it also sometimes involves emotion. For example, picking up a spoon triggers no real emotion, while feeling a gentle caress often does.
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