Social Neuroscien...
Follow
Find
3.7K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
onto Social Neuroscience Advances
Scoop.it!

Researchers discover how brain cells change their tune (w/ Video)

Researchers discover how brain cells change their tune (w/ Video) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Brain cells talk to each other in a variety of tones. Sometimes they speak loudly but other times struggle to be heard. For many years scientists have asked why and how brain cells change tones so frequently.
more...
No comment yet.
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Dominant people can be surprisingly social

Dominant people can be surprisingly social | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In contrast to the lay stereotype, dominant people prove to be avid social learners, just like dominant individuals in the animal kingdom.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Bee brains offer insights into how human memories form

Bee brains offer insights into how human memories form | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—University of Queensland scientists have discovered that genes switch off as memories are being formed, allowing for new connections between nerve cells.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Stress reaction may be in your dad's DNA, study finds

Stress reaction may be in your dad's DNA, study finds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Stress in this generation could mean resilience in the next, a new study suggests.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Johns Hopkins scientists present findings at the Society for Neuroscience meeting | Science Codex

Nanosymposium 18.10 Sat., 3:15 p.m., Walter E. Washington Convention Center, 150A Lindsay Hayes and Akira Sawa A Blood Pressure Hormone Implicated in Psychosis
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting Showcases Strides in Exploring the Brain

More than 30,000 brain advocates from academia, industry and media converged on Washington, D.C. this week for the 44th annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Harming kin to save strangers: further evidence for abnormally utilitarian moral judgments after ventromedial prefrontal damage. - PubMed - NCBI

The ventromedial PFC (vmPFC) has been implicated as a critical neural substrate mediating the influence of emotion on moral reasoning. It has been shown that the vmPFC is especially important for making moral judgments about "high-conflict" moral dilemmas involving direct personal actions, that is, scenarios that pit compelling utilitarian considerations of aggregate welfare against the highly emotionally aversive act of directly causing harm to others [Koenigs, M., Young, L., Adolphs, R., Tranel, D., Cushman, F., Hauser, M., et al. Damage to the prefrontal cortex increases utilitarian moral judgments. Nature, 446, 908-911, 2007]. The current study was designed to elucidate further the role of the vmPFC in high-conflict moral judgments, including those that involve indirect personal actions, such as indirectly causing harm to one's kin to save a group of strangers. We found that patients with vmPFC lesions were more likely than brain-damaged and healthy comparison participants to endorse utilitarian outcomes on high-conflict dilemmas regardless of whether the dilemmas (1) entailed direct versus indirect personal harms and (2) were presented from the Self versus Other perspective. In addition, all groups were more likely to endorse utilitarian outcomes in the Other perspective as compared with the Self perspective. These results provide important extensions of previous work, and the findings align with the proposal that the vmPFC is critical for reasoning about moral dilemmas in which anticipating the social-emotional consequences of an action (e.g., guilt or remorse) is crucial for normal moral judgments [Greene, J. D. Why are VMPFC patients more utilitarian?: A dual-process theory of moral judgment explains. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 11, 322-323, 2007; Koenigs, M., Young, L., Adolphs, R., Tranel, D., Cushman, F., Hauser, M., et al. Damage to the prefrontal cortex increases utilitarian moral judgments. Nature, 446, 908-911, 2007].


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Brain Imaging and Neuroscience: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
Scoop.it!

First known molecular signalling control for neurogenesis identified.

First known molecular signalling control for neurogenesis identified. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have succeeded in explaining how stem cells in the brain change to allow one type of stem cell to produce different cell types at different stages. In an openso...

Via Donald J Bolger
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Early Brain Development
Scoop.it!

Meet the Two Scientists Who Implanted a False Memory Into a Mouse

Meet the Two Scientists Who Implanted a False Memory Into a Mouse | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The prospect of tinkering precisely with memory has tantalized scientists for years. “A lot of people had been thinking along these lines,” says Sheena Josselyn, a senior neuroscientist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, who studies the cellular underpinnings of memory, “but they never dreamed that these experiments would actually work. No one ever thought that you could actually, really do this.”

Via Deborah McNelis
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Growth Factor Regenerates Damaged Nerves Without Sprouting New Blood Vessels

Growth Factor Regenerates Damaged Nerves Without Sprouting New Blood Vessels | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
VEGF-B can regenerate damaged peripheral nerves without causing new blood vessels to grow, a new study reports.
more...
Tosh's curator insight, November 18, 4:58 AM

Joint replacement surgery is removing a damaged joint and replace with new one.Replacing a joint can relieve pain and help to you move and feel better.Some of symptoms are:
knee stiffens 
knees becomes stiff or swollen
difficulty walking or climbing stairs
Visit:http://goo.gl/TNoK64

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

New Brain Disease ID'd With Similarities to Alzheimer's - PsychCentral.com

New Brain Disease ID'd With Similarities to Alzheimer's - PsychCentral.com | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have identified a disease that has similar symptoms as Alzheimer’s yet is biologically different.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

TSRI Researchers Discover New Type of Neuron that Plays Key Role in Nicotine Addiction

TSRI Researchers Discover New Type of Neuron that Plays Key Role in Nicotine Addiction | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that the brain's reward and stress systems are actually linked.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy Curriculum
Scoop.it!

Research: The Stanford Center for Compassion & Altruism

Research: The Stanford Center for Compassion & Altruism | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Since 2009, I’ve worked with the Stanford Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education to develop and scientifically study programs that train compassion, empathy, and self-compassion, as well as to train professionals in leading such programs worldwide.
Below are some key resources related to this work.
Scientific Articles (Links to Full Text)


A randomized controlled trial of compassion cultivation training: Effects on mindfulness, affect, and emotion regulation. Jazaieri, Hooria, Kelly McGonigal, Thupten Jinpa, James R. Doty, James J. Gross, and Philippe R. Goldin. (2014). Motivation and Emotion, 38(1), 23-35.


Enhancing compassion: A randomized controlled trial of a compassion cultivation training program. Jazaieri, Hooria, Geshe Thupten Jinpa, Kelly McGonigal, Erika L. Rosenberg, Joel Finkelstein, Emiliana Simon-Thomas, Margaret Cullen, James R. Doty, James J. Gross, and Philippe R. Goldin. Journal of Happiness Studies 14, no. 4 (2013): 1113-1126.


Pilot study of a compassion meditation intervention in chronic pain. Chapin, Heather L., Beth D. Darnall, Emma M. Seppala, James R. Doty, Jennifer M. Hah, and Sean C. Mackey. Journal of Compassionate Health Care 1 (2014): 1-12.


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from leapmind
Scoop.it!

33rd Square | Where Will Big Neuroscience Take Us?

33rd Square | Where Will Big Neuroscience Take Us? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

We’re entering the era of big neuroscience. In a little over a year, the United States, Europe, Japan and Israel have launched brain research projects with big budgets and bold ambitions. Several other countries are expected to follow suit.


Via LeapMind
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Dopamine leaves its mark in brain scans

Dopamine leaves its mark in brain scans | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify which areas of the brain are active during specific tasks.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Damage to brain networks affects stroke recovery

Damage to brain networks affects stroke recovery | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—Initial results of an innovative study may significantly change how some patients are evaluated after a stroke, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Body's bacteria may keep our brains healthy and the blood-brain barrier intact

Body's bacteria may keep our brains healthy and the blood-brain barrier intact | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The microbes that live in your body outnumber your cells 10 to one. Recent studies suggest these tiny organisms help us digest food and maintain our immune system. Now, researchers have discovered yet another way microbes keep us healthy: They are needed for closing the blood-brain barrier, a molecular fence that shuts out pathogens and molecules that could harm the brain.


The findings suggest that a woman's diet or exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy may influence the development of this barrier. The work could also lead to a better understanding of multiple sclerosis, in which a leaky blood-brain barrier may set the stage for a decline in brain function.


The first evidence that bacteria may help fortify the body’s biological barriers came in 2001. Researchers discovered that microbes in the gut activate genes that code for gap junction proteins, which are critical to building the gut wall. Without these proteins, gut pathogens can enter the bloodstream and cause disease.


In the new study, intestinal biologist Sven Pettersson and his postdoc Viorica Braniste of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm decided to look at the blood-brain barrier, which also has gap junction proteins. They tested how leaky the blood-brain barrier was in developing and adult mice. Some of the rodents were brought up in a sterile environment and thus were germ-free, with no detectable microbes in their bodies. Braniste then injected antibodies—which are too big to get through the blood-brain barrier—into embryos developing within either germ-free moms or moms with the typical microbes, or microbiota.


The studies showed that the blood-brain barrier typically forms a tight seal a little more than 17 days into development. Antibodies infiltrated the brains of all the embryos younger than 17 days, but they continued to enter the brains of embryos of germ-free mothers well beyond day 17, the team reports online today in Science Translational Medicine. Embryos from germ-free mothers also had fewer intact gap junction proteins, and gap junction protein genes in their brains were less active, which may explain the persistent leakiness.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Vloasis's curator insight, November 22, 11:04 AM

So basically, embryos from germ-free mothers did not develop as efficiently, or as well?

Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

3-D deep-imaging advance likely to drive new biological insights

3-D deep-imaging advance likely to drive new biological insights | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

In a significant technical advance, a team of neuroscientists at The Rockefeller University has devised a fast, inexpensive imaging method for probing the molecular intricacies of large biological samples in three dimensions, an achievement that could have far reaching implications in a wide array of basic biological investigations.

The new method, called iDISCO, optimizes techniques for deep tissue immunolabeling and combines them with recent technological innovations in tissue clearing and light sheet microscopy to achieve unprecedented deep labeling and imaging of molecular structures in the brain, the kidney, and other organs and tissues in experimental settings. A detailed report on iDISCO is published in the November 6 issue of the journal Cell.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Compassion Definition - GreaterGood.Berkeley.edu

Compassion Definition  - GreaterGood.Berkeley.edu | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Compassion literally means “to suffer together.” Among emotion researchers, it is defined as the feeling that arises when you are confronted with another’s suffering and feel motivated to relieve that suffering.


Compassion is not the same as empathy or altruism, though the concepts are related. While empathy refers more generally to our ability to take the perspective of and feel the emotions of another person, compassion is when those feelings and thoughts include the desire to help. Altruism, in turn, is the kind, selfless behavior often prompted by feelings of compassion, though one can feel compassion without acting on it, and altruism isn’t always motivated by compassion.


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Neural correlates of moral judgments in first- and third-person perspectives: implications for neuroethics and beyond.- PubMed - NCBI

BMC Neurosci. 2014 Apr 1;15:39. doi: 10.1186/1471-2202-15-39. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't


BACKGROUND:

There appears to be an inconsistency in experimental paradigms used in fMRI research on moral judgments. As stimuli, moral dilemmas or moral statements/ pictures that induce emotional reactions are usually employed; a main difference between these stimuli is the perspective of the participants reflecting first-person (moral dilemmas) or third-person perspective (moral reactions). The present study employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in order to investigate the neural correlates of moral judgments in either first- or third-person perspective.

RESULTS:

Our results indicate that different neural mechanisms appear to be involved in these perspectives. Although conjunction analysis revealed common activation in the anterior medial prefrontal cortex, third person-perspective elicited unique activations in hippocampus and visual cortex. The common activation can be explained by the role the anterior medial prefrontal cortex may play in integrating different information types and also by its involvement in theory of mind. Our results also indicate that the so-called "actor-observer bias" affects moral evaluation in the third-person perspective, possibly due to the involvement of the hippocampus. We suggest two possible ways in which the hippocampus may support the process of moral judgment: by the engagement of episodic memory and its role in understanding the behaviors and emotions of others.

CONCLUSION:

We posit that these findings demonstrate that first or third person perspectives in moral cognition involve distinct neural processes, that are important to different aspects of moral judgments. These results are important to a deepened understanding of neural correlates of moral cognition-the so-called "first tradition" of neuroethics, with the caveat that any results must be interpreted and employed with prudence, so as to heed neuroethics "second tradition" that sustains the pragmatic evaluation of outcomes, capabilities and limitations of neuroscientific techniques and technologies.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Brain Imaging and Neuroscience: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
Scoop.it!

Neuroimaging study begins to map damage caused by anxiety in the brain.

Neuroimaging study begins to map damage caused by anxiety in the brain. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are at increased risk of converting to Alzheimer's disease within a few years, but a new study warns the risk increases significantly if they suffer from...

Via Donald J Bolger
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Do You Want To Know About Your Brain? - New York Times (blog)

Do You Want To Know About Your Brain? - New York Times (blog) | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research suggests many people don’t think that much about brain science. Should they?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Major Brain Pathway Rediscovered after Century Old Confusion and Controversy

Major Brain Pathway Rediscovered after Century Old Confusion and Controversy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers 'rediscover' a neural pathway and provide new analytical tools which allow for easy identification of the brain structure.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Readying the neural network - Medical Xpress

Readying the neural network - Medical Xpress | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Synapse, the name for the signal-receiving site on a neuron, comes from the Greek word for contact. Neuroscientists used to maintain that neurons form one-to-one relationship to contact one another.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Morality And Empathy Make People Selfless: People Would Rather Lose Money Than See Others Get Hurt

Morality And Empathy Make People Selfless: People Would Rather Lose Money Than See Others Get Hurt | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People are willing to sacrifice more money to prevent another person from getting hurt than they are to prevent themselves from harm.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Removing the brake: How to increase brain activity and memory

Removing the brake: How to increase brain activity and memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Is it possible to rapidly increase (or decrease) the amount of information the brain can store? A new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) suggests is may be. Their research has identified a molecule that improves brain function and memory recall is improved. Published in the latest issue of Cell Reports, the study has implications for neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, such as autism spectral disorders and Alzheimer’s disease.


“Our findings show that the brain has a key protein called FXR1P (Fragile X Related Protein 1) that limits the production of molecules necessary for memory formation,” says RI-MUHC neuroscientist Keith Murai, the study’s senior author and Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University. “When this brake-protein is suppressed, the brain is able to store more information.”


Murai and his colleagues used a mouse model to study how changes in brain cell connections produce new memories. When FXR1P was selectively removed from certain parts of the brain, new molecules were produced. They strengthened connections between brain cells, which correlated with improved memory and recall in the mice.


“The role of FXR1P was a surprising result,” says Dr. Murai. “Previous to our work, no-one had identified a role for this regulator in the brain. Our findings have provided fundamental knowledge about how the brain processes information. We’ve identified a new pathway that directly regulates how information is handled and this could have relevance for understanding and treating brain diseases.” 


“Future research in this area could be very interesting,” he adds. “If we can identify compounds that control the braking potential of FXR1P, we may be able to alter the amount of brain activity or plasticity. For example, in autism, one may want to decrease certain brain activity and in Alzheimer’s disease, we may want to enhance the activity. By manipulating FXR1P, we may eventually be able to adjust memory formation and retrieval, thus improving the quality of life of people suffering from brain diseases.” 



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, November 17, 4:28 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Diane Johnson's curator insight, November 18, 9:21 AM

NGSS includes opportunities for students to understand and apply learning about information processing in biological systems

Lucile Debethune's curator insight, November 21, 5:45 AM

Parmi les nombreuses proteines du cerveau, cette recherche se concentre sur la proteines FXR1P, qui agit comme un frein à la production de molécule nécessaire à la formation de molécules. Travailler sur cette protéine pourait être un élément clef dans le traitement du fonctionnement anormal du cerveau.