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Key target responsible for triggering detrimental effects in brain trauma identified

Key target responsible for triggering detrimental effects in brain trauma identified | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers studying a type of cell found in the trillions in our brain have made an important discovery as to how it responds to brain injury and disease such as stroke.
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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The Neuroscience of Fairness and Injustice

The Neuroscience of Fairness and Injustice | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
How Our Brains Are Wired to Resist Unfair Treatment

Humans are inherently social beings. We care not only about material and financial rewards, but also about social status, belonging, and respect. Research studies show that our brains automatically evaluate the fairness of how financial rewards are distributed. We seem to have a happiness response to fair treatment and a disgust or protest response to unfairness. Thisbrain wiring has implications for life happiness, relationship satisfaction, raising kids, and organizational leadership.  This article will examine how we define fairness, how your brain processes experiences of fairness and unfairness, and how to cope with life’s unfair moments..

 


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Eli Levine's curator insight, Today, 9:37 AM

An addendum to this should be that we resist what we each and all define as injustice, unfairness, and tyranny.  The definition of these things are objectively subjective, which is how we get differences of opinion and belief.  However, there are some things that are common to us all, and one has to wonder at the definitions of some other people, as to whether or not their definitions match up with what the collective actually is feeling.

 

For example, conservatives and Libertarians can be living in absolute poverty, and think it unfair that richer people be taxed more to help raise them out of poverty.  Economically, it's impossible to lift oneself up by your own bootstraps alone, without someone providing you boots to do so.  You can't get something from nothing, and that's what some conservatives and Libertarians have.  So, not only are they incorrect about how the economy works, but they're also advocating policy that many more of us would find unjust and unfair when phrased explicitly and honestly to the public.  You can change people's stated opinions through manipulation of the question phrases.  However, you usually can't and don't change the deep, complicated sentiments that most people have without having some kind of "aha" moment that is endogenous to themselves.  Enlightenment is not a gift that can be given.  It has to be produced from within you based on your actions, attitudes, behaviors, and experiences.

 

Therefore, it is primarily through this confusion of fact and manipulation of phrasing, ignorance, and plain callousness that we get differing opinions as to what fair is in many cases.  Some variety is ok.  However, the extremes of difference that we're experiencing do not reflect the common reality in which we are living.  The actual consequences that are realized from the conservative and Libertarian approach would not be supported by the majority opinion (when asked honestly and explicitly) because most of us have a different and more accurate understanding of fairness.  Quite frankly, I don't know how it is that we spend so much time caught up with individuals who don't know, don't care to know, and refuse to accept the common reality around them for the sake of a presupposed, manufactured and highly inaccurate perception of the world, with the unworkable and unjust opinions and conclusions that follow from their distorted view of the world.  It's time that we ideologically ditch all ideologies, ideologues, and people whose opinions don't match the common reality; people who refuse to accept the common reality, even when it is clearly presented to them.  They will get us killed, in the long term, because they are like bats who do not have properly functioning echo location senses.  They will fly us all into trees, into water, into the ground, or into some hungry predator's mouth, because they've presupposed the reality and are dug into those presuppositions, rather than attentive to the reality itself that is around them.

 

I don't want to die because of these people.  Do you?

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Maturing Brain Flips Function of Amygdala in Regulating Stress Hormones

Maturing Brain Flips Function of Amygdala in Regulating Stress Hormones | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
According to a new study, the amygdala has an inhibitory effect on cortisol during early development of nonhuman primates.
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How Self-Compassion Beats Rumination

How Self-Compassion Beats Rumination | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
“I can’t do this right,” says my patient Carla. “I know I’m going to fail. I can never do anything right.”  The most innocent wish—to walk in the park, to meet a friend for lunch, to meditate— would trigger this relentlessly harsh inner voice, 24/7.
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Stuck in neutral: Brain defect traps schizophrenics in twilight zone

Stuck in neutral: Brain defect traps schizophrenics in twilight zone | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People with schizophrenia struggle to turn goals into actions because brain structures governing desire and emotion are less active and fail to pass goal-directed messages to cortical regions affecting human decision-making, new research reveals.
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Researchers Obtain Key Insights into How the Internal Body Clock is Tuned

Researchers Obtain Key Insights into How the Internal Body Clock is Tuned | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers discover a new way that circadian rhythm is regulated by long non-coding RNA.
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An MRI-guided brain surgery technology goes global

An MRI-guided brain surgery technology goes global | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

An MRI-guided laser system that allows surgeons to perform brain surgery on tumors and epileptic lesions in the brain is expected to become widely available to patients in need now that the technology has been acquired from Visualase Inc. by the global medical device company Medtronic, Inc., says a biomedical engineering professor from Texas A&M University who co-founded the company responsible for the technology.


The technology, says Gerard Coté, professor in the university’s Department of Biomedical Engineering and director of the Center for Remote Healthcare Technology, enables surgeons to pinpoint and destroy brain tumors and lesions with extreme precision and is a much less-invasive alternative to conventional surgery.


The advantage of this approach over other approaches for brain surgery, Coté explains, is that it can be performed while the patient is awake, requires no radiation and no skull flap (the large opening in traditional craniotomies), and is often performed in otherwise inoperable areas of the brain.


Traditional brain surgery, he explains, is usually a daylong operation that involves removing part of the skull, cutting through healthy brain matter and physically removing the problematic tissue. That procedure, he adds, can be followed by a weeklong hospital stay and prolonged recovery period. 


The technology developed by former Texas A&M students Ashok Gowda and the late Roger McNichols, conversely, can be completed in about four hours, and most patients can return home the following day, Coté says. 


Known as “Visualase,” the technology is already used in more than 45 hospitals, nationwide, including 15 pediatric hospitals. Before the surgical procedure, computer software first helps identify the targeted tissue so that it may be treated and the surrounding healthy tissue can be avoided, Coté explains. During the procedure, a small entry is made in the skull that allows a laser applicator (about the size of a pencil lead) to be inserted into the tissue. The patient is placed in the MRI, and a physician receives and reviews images to verify proper positioning of the laser applicator in the skull. The clinician then uses a laser to heat and destroy the problematic tissue while imaging the tissue being damaged in real time to ensure destruction of the problematic tissue and to avoid damaging healthy tissue. The laser applicator is then removed, and the scalp is closed with one stitch, Coté notes.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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How Practicing Makes Your Brain Better

How Practicing Makes Your Brain Better | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A lot of contemporary neuroscience has focused on the importance of practice when it comes to honing your talents. In general, we all understand that practice improves our ability to play the viola, hit a golf ball, prepare tasty meals, etc.
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David Hain's curator insight, August 18, 4:48 AM

"The more I practise, the luckier I get!" ~ Gary Player

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DNA methylation involved in Alzheimer's disease

DNA methylation involved in Alzheimer's disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and Rush University Medical Center, reveals how early changes in brain DNA methylation are involved in Alzheimer's disease.
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Scientists Use Lasers to Control Mouse Brain Switchboard

Scientists Use Lasers to Control Mouse Brain Switchboard | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new optogenetics study could be a breakthrough in understanding how the TRN influences consciousness.
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Researchers identify a brain 'switchboard' important in attention and sleep

Researchers identify a brain 'switchboard' important in attention and sleep | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere, using a mouse model, have recorded the activity of individual nerve cells in a small part of the brain that works as a "switchboard," directing signals coming from the outside world or...
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Stroke researchers link ability to self-administer medication with memory loss

Stroke researchers link ability to self-administer medication with memory loss | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Kessler stroke researchers and colleagues have identified an association between over-optimistic estimation of one's own ability to take medications accurately, and memory loss among stroke survivors.
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Depression Linked to Parkinson’s Disease

Depression Linked to Parkinson’s Disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study reports that depression is under-treated in Parkinson's patients.
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Naughty or nice? The Moral Molecule

Naughty or nice? The Moral Molecule | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
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Responsive Neurological Stimulation and the Neuropace RNS System

Responsive Neurological Stimulation and the Neuropace RNS System | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Jose Cavazos, MD, Professor of Medicine – Neurology & Physiology, Associate Professor of Pharmacology at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, discusses responsive neurological stimulation (RNS) and how it works.
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The Golden Age of Neuroscience Has Arrived - Wall Street Journal

The Golden Age of Neuroscience Has Arrived - Wall Street Journal | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it


So the promise of this new revolution in neuroscience is profound, holding out the ability to someday alleviate suffering and enhance our true mental potential.

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Walking in Your Shoes

Walking in Your Shoes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

To walk in the other person's shoes is perhaps the most important first step we can do to develop our emotional intelligence. This is called "empathy," and it is defined as the capacity to experience another person's point of view.


British philosopher Roman Krznaric who studied the topic in depth, observes that empathy includes also understanding the other's feelings, and using that understanding to guide our actions.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Good neighbors and friendly local community may curb heart attack risk

Good neighbors and friendly local community may curb heart attack risk | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Having good neighbors and feeling connected to others in the local community may help to curb an individual's heart attack risk, concludes research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
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Targeted Brain Stimulation Aids Stroke Recovery in Mice

Targeted Brain Stimulation Aids Stroke Recovery in Mice | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Using optogenetics to stimulate mice brains five days after a stroke helped improve motor control and brain chemistry, researchers report.
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The role of lactate in boosting memory

The role of lactate in boosting memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—EPFL researchers have decoded the mechanism by which a glucose derivative activates receptors involved in memorization.
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Epigenetic Breakthrough Bolsters Understanding of Alzheimer’s Disease

Epigenetic Breakthrough Bolsters Understanding of Alzheimer’s Disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study reports people with more Alzheimer's related neuropathology in their brains had higher levels of DNA modifications within the ANK1 gene.
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High-fidelity optical reporting of neuronal electrical activity with an ultrafast fluorescent voltage sensor

High-fidelity optical reporting of neuronal electrical activity with an ultrafast fluorescent voltage sensor | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

In this technical report, St-Pierre and colleagues introduce a new genetically encoded voltage sensor called Accelerated Sensor of Action Potentials 1 (ASAP1), which consists of a circularly permuted GFP inserted in the extracellular voltage-sensing domain of a phosphatase. ASAP1 surpasses existing sensors in reliably detecting single action potentials and tracking subthreshold potentials and high-frequency spike trains. (...) -  by St-Pierre F. et al., Nature Neuroscience 17, 884–889 (2014)


Via Julien Hering, PhD
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Bypass Commands From the Brain to Legs Through a Computer

Bypass Commands From the Brain to Legs Through a Computer | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have successfully made an artificial connection from the brain to the locomotion center in the spinal cord by bypassing with a computer interface.
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Biology of love at first sight: Study explains the mechanism of "Cupid's arrow"

Biology of love at first sight: Study explains the mechanism of "Cupid's arrow" | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Waseda university researchers have identified certain chemicals in the brain which regulate downstream reproductive hormones of males.
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Promising New Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis

Promising New Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers report common anti-psychotic drugs could be effective in the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis.
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Dopamine Replacement Therapy Associated with Increase in Impulse Control Disorders Among Early Parkinson’s Disease Patients

Dopamine Replacement Therapy Associated with Increase in Impulse Control Disorders Among Early Parkinson’s Disease Patients | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Anxiety and depression are more common in newly diagnosed Parkinson's patients than in the general population, a new study reports.
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