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» Cannabis Not the Only Drug Linked to Schizophrenia - Psych Central News

» Cannabis Not the Only Drug Linked to Schizophrenia - Psych Central News | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Psychosis that results from the use of several types of illegal drugs is strongly associated with a future clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia, new research
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Study finds antidepressants affect morality and decision-making

Study finds antidepressants affect morality and decision-making | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Healthy people who are given commonly prescribed mood-altering drugs see significant changes in the degree to which they are willing to tolerate harm against themselves and others, according to a study published Thursday.
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Brain folding related to surface area and thickness, not number of neurons

Brain folding related to surface area and thickness, not number of neurons | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—A pair of researchers with Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro has found that the degree of folding of mammalian brains follows a simple mathematical relationship.
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Imaging the earliest Old World monkey brain {Duke University Research}

The brain hidden inside the oldest known Old World monkey skull has been visualized for the first time. The ancient monkey, known as Victoriapithecus, first ...
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Making waves with groundbreaking brain research

Making waves with groundbreaking brain research | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New research by Jason Gallivan and Randy Flanagan suggests that when deciding which of several possible actions to perform, the human brain plans multiple actions simultaneously prior to selecting one of them to execute.
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Research reveals how the human brain might reconstruct past events

Research reveals how the human brain might reconstruct past events | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
When remembering something from our past, we often vividly re-experience the whole episode in which it occurred. New UCL research funded by the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust has now revealed how this might happen in the brain.
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Hearing words, writing sounds: examining the author's brain

Hearing words, writing sounds: examining the author's brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Kamila Shamsie always revises her work by reading aloud, but AS Byatt looks for the rhythms of the page. Richard Lea goes in search of what happens in the brain when we write and read fiction

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Cortisol Reinforces Traumatic Memories

Cortisol Reinforces Traumatic Memories | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
According to a new study, cortisol strengthens traumatic memories, both when the memory is formed and when it is reconsolidated.

 

"It had been shown that the stress hormone cortisol has a strengthening impact on the consolidation of memories, i.e. the several-hour process in the course of which a memory is formed immediately after the experience. Image is for illustrative purposes only. Image credit: Ben Mills."


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Smile and the World Smiles With You

According to a new study, smiling changes the way our brains process other people's emotions.
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Scientists identify a calcium channel essential for deep sleep

Scientists identify a calcium channel essential for deep sleep | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Sleep seems simple enough, a state of rest and restoration that almost every vertebrate creature must enter regularly in order to survive.
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Methadone linked to initial QTc prolongation in chronic pain

Methadone linked to initial QTc prolongation in chronic pain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(HealthDay)—For patients with chronic pain, methadone is associated with a small, but nonsignificant, initial increase in QTc, which does not persist, according to a study published in the June issue of Pain Medicine.
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Long-acting antipsychotic medication may improve treatment for schizophrenia

Long-acting antipsychotic medication may improve treatment for schizophrenia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Schizophrenia, which affects 2 million to 3 million people in the U.S., causes hallucinations, delusions and disorganization.
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Are your emotional responses normal or abnormal?

Are your emotional responses normal or abnormal? | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
We all feel emotion, we all get upset, can feel low, angry and overjoyed, but when do these emotional responses become something of a medical concern? When are these feelings inappropriate, too intense, or lasting too long?
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Therapy Affects the Brain of People with Tourette Syndrome

Therapy Affects the Brain of People with Tourette Syndrome | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In addition to its effect on chronic tics, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can change the brain function of people with Tourette syndrome. This is what is revealed in a study by researchers at the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal (CIUSSS de l'Est-de-l'Île-de-Montréal) and the University of Montreal, the results of which will be presented at the First World Congress on Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders, to be held in London from June 24 to 26.
Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder mainly characterized by motor and vocal tics in affected people. A tic is generally defined as a semi-voluntary movement or vocalization with no specific purpose. "There is still no definitive explanation of the causes of this syndrome, but we know that tics are related to an impaired communication between the supplementary motor area – a region of the cerebral cortex – and deeper areas called the basal ganglia,” said Simon Morand-Beaulieu, a student at the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal and the University of Montreal’s Department of Neuroscience.

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Old World monkey had tiny, complex brain

Old World monkey had tiny, complex brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The brain hidden inside the oldest known Old World monkey skull has been visualized for the first time. The creature's tiny but remarkably wrinkled brain supports the idea that brain complexity can evolve before brain size in the primate family tree.
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Survival of the fittest: How brain tumors adapt through complex ecosystems

Survival of the fittest: How brain tumors adapt through complex ecosystems | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Despite advances in medical technology and a constantly evolving understanding of the mechanisms of cancer progression, researchers and clinicians are faced with a litany of challenges along the road to finding a cure for the most aggressive forms...
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Hope for Alzheimer's treatment as researchers find licensed drugs halt brain degeneration

Hope for Alzheimer's treatment as researchers find licensed drugs halt brain degeneration | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Studies on mice show two existing medicines could help restore protein production in brain and prevent memory loss, speeding up search for cure
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Researchers show how our sense of smell evolved, including in cave men

Researchers show how our sense of smell evolved, including in cave men | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A group of scientists led by Dr Kara Hoover of the University of Alaska Fairbanks and including Professor Matthew Cobb of The University of Manchester, has studied how our sense of smell has evolved, and has even reconstructed how a long-extinct...
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Commonly prescribed drugs affect decisions to harm oneself and others

Commonly prescribed drugs affect decisions to harm oneself and others | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Healthy people given the serotonin-enhancing antidepressant citalopram were willing to pay almost twice as much to prevent harm to themselves or others than those given placebo drugs in a moral decision-making experiment at UCL.
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Long-Term Memories Are Maintained by Prion-Like Proteins

Long-Term Memories Are Maintained by Prion-Like Proteins | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Research from Eric Kandel’s lab has uncovered further evidence of a system in the brain that persistently maintains memories for long periods of time.

 

"Memories are stored for the long-term with the help of prion-like proteins called CPEB. CPEB prions aggregate and maintain synapses that recorded the memory [“spines” in the bottom image]. When CPEB prions are not present or are inactivated, the synapses collapse and the memory fades [see upper image]."


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Energy for Visual Processing Provided by Microtubules in Retinal Neurons

Researchers have identified a thick band of microtubules within retinal neurons which help provide the energy required for visual processing.
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As a music therapist I can give people back the power to communicate

As a music therapist I can give people back the power to communicate | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Regular sessions can help reduce anxiety among people with mental health conditions such as depression and dementia On a weekday, it’s normally an early start; responding to urgent emails before heading to my office at the music therapy research...

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Brain Cells Protected From Age Damage With Help of Common Protein

MACKS, a common protein, could help to protect the brain from age related damage.
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Alzheimer’s disease works differently in patients with and without Down syndrome

Alzheimer’s disease works differently in patients with and without Down syndrome | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of Kentucky’s Sanders-Brown Center on Aging have completed a study that revealed differences in the way brain inflammation — considered a key component of AD– is expressed in different subsets of patients, in...
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Brain scan can predict who responds best to certain treatment for OCD

Brain scan can predict who responds best to certain treatment for OCD | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Tens of millions of Americans — an estimated 1 to 2 percent of the population — will suffer at some point in their lifetimes from obsessive-compulsive disorder, a disorder characterized by recurrent, intrusive, and disturbing thoughts (obsessions),...
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New Brain Stimulation Device Shows Promise for Depression

New Brain Stimulation Device Shows Promise for Depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People who suffer from major depressive disorder (MDD) may experience relief through synchronized transcranial magnetic stimulation (sTMS) therapy, according to a new study that tested the safety and efficacy of low-field magnetic stimulation using the new NEST® device on adult patients with MDD.

The findings are published in the Elsevier journal Brain Stimulation.

For the study, more than 200 participants were evaluated from 17 leading academic and private psychiatric institutions in the United States; enrollment included both treatment naïve and treatment-resistant patients as previous exposure to antidepressant medication was not a requirement for inclusion into the trial.

“The study found sTMS therapy to be significantly more effective than sham when administered as intended, supporting the hypothesis that low-field magnetic stimulation improves depressive symptoms,” said principal investigator Andrew Leuchter, M.D., professor of Psychiatry in the Semel Institute at University of California, Los Angeles.

“Additional analyses found subjects who failed to benefit from or tolerate prior antidepressant treatment in the current episode were most likely to demonstrate significant benefit from sTMS therapy compared to sham.”

When delivered accurately and consistently, sTMS therapy was successful in relieving depression symptoms in 34.2 percent of participants who had not responded to drug treatment, compared to 8.3 percent of those treated with an inactive device.

In addition, NEST® appeared safe and tolerable, with no significant differences seen between active and sham treatment in the rate or severity of negative events. There were no device-related serious adverse events in this study.

“These promising results indicate that sTMS is a promising novel technology for the treatment of depression,” said co-author Mark S. George, M.D., Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry, Radiology and Neurology at the Medical University of South Carolina, and the Editor-in-Chief of Brain Stimulation.

“This technology is revolutionary in two ways over the current FDA-approved forms of TMS. First, this device tunes the stimulation to the patient’s own brain rhythms. By stimulating at each patient’s individual resonant frequency, sTMS may be able to achieve therapeutic success using lower energy. Second, this device is safe, easy to use, and portable, which would allow use in a wide variety of treatment settings.
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