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Trying to be happier works when listening to upbeat music

Trying to be happier works when listening to upbeat music | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Recent research discovered that an individual can indeed successfully try to be happier, especially when cheery music aids the process. This research points to ways that people can actively improve their moods and corroborates earlier research.

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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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New estrogen-based compound suppresses binge-like eating behavior in female mice

New estrogen-based compound suppresses binge-like eating behavior in female mice | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Binge eating, an eating disorder in which a person frequently consumes unusually large amounts of food in a short period of time, affects about 5 to 10 percent of U.S. adults and is more common in women than men.
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Antidepressants show potential for postoperative pain

Antidepressants show potential for postoperative pain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Anesthesiologists examine studies where antidepressants were prescribed for pain after surgery. Clinical trials are often used to answer questions about the efficacy of the off-label uses of drugs.
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What happens when you remove the hippocampus? - Sam Kean

What happens when you remove the hippocampus? - Sam Kean | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
When Henry Molaison (now widely known as H.M.) cracked his skull in an
accident, he began blacking out and having seizures. In an attempt to
cure him, daredevil surgeon Dr. William Skoville removed H.M.'s
hippocampus. Luckily, the seizures did go away — but so did his
long-term memory! Sam Kean walks us through this astonishing medical case,
detailing everything H.M. taught us about the brain and memory.

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The Neuroscience of Resiliency: An Interview with Linda Graham - Mindfulness and Psychotherapy

The Neuroscience of Resiliency: An Interview with Linda Graham - Mindfulness and Psychotherapy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Linda Graham, author of Bouncing Back shares with us what we can do to wire a more resilient brain.

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Your Brain Judges Trustworthiness Before You Know It - PsychCentral.com

Your Brain Judges Trustworthiness Before You Know It - PsychCentral.com | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Your Brain Judges Trustworthiness Before You Know It PsychCentral.com Your brain makes a spontaneous judgment of whether or not another person's face is trustworthy before you are even conscious of it, according to new research published in the...
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A New Understanding of Compassionate Empathy

A New Understanding of Compassionate Empathy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A User's Guide To Compassionate Empathy


Sharing our deep feelings is the way out of the isolation of loneliness. It creates a doorway into the practice of what we call compassionat eempathy.


Compassionate empathy is the key to getting out of an irrelationship.

While empathy can be all-absorbing[consuming] and leave one totally empty and burned-out, to the point that one loses a sense of one’s own boundaries, compassionate empathy allows behaviors that allow profound feelings of connection to another person, without danger to one’s own emotional balance because the compassion applies to oneself and others. 


Empathy alone, on the other hand, can become very lopsided when compulsive caregiving is involved. Compassionate empathy is built on the skill of sharing honestly with another person. It makes isolation difficult to maintain because it undermines self-obsession.  Compassion is the antidote to compulsion.


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Neuroscientists watch imagination happening in the brain | neuroscientistnews.com

Neuroscientists watch imagination happening in the brain | neuroscientistnews.com | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
"You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one," sang John Lennon in his 1971 song Imagine. And thanks to the dreams of a Brigham Young University (BYU) student, we now know more about where and how imagination happens in our brains. Stefania Ashby and her faculty mentor devised experiments using MRI technology that would help them distinguish pure imagination from related processes like remembering. "I was thinking a lot about planning for my own future and imagining myself in the future, and I started wondering how memory and imagination work together," Ashby said. "I wondered if they were separate or if imagination is just taking past memories and combining them in different ways to form something I've never experienced before." There's a bit of scientific debate over whether memory and imagination truly are distinct processes. So Ashby and her faculty mentor devised MRI experiments to put it to the test. - See more at: http://www.neuroscientistnews.com/research-news/neuroscientists-watch-imagination-happening-brain#sthash.Bv6SlA1Y.dpuf

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Why your favourite song takes you down memory lane

Why your favourite song takes you down memory lane | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Music triggers different functions of the brain, which helps explain why listening to a song you like might be enjoyable but a favourite song may plunge you into nostalgia, scientists said on Thursday.
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Magnetic brain stimulation treatment shown to boost memory

Magnetic brain stimulation treatment shown to boost memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Non-invasive transcranial technique leads to 24-hour-long improvement in memory function and could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer's and other conditions

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Changing the Emotional Association of Memories

Changing the Emotional Association of Memories | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new study reports researchers have been able to alter the emotional association of specific memories by manipulating neural circuits in mouse brains.

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Structural States of a Brain Receptor Revealed

Structural States of a Brain Receptor Revealed | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers have determined the detailed structure and movement of the glutamate receptor.
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Off-line consolidation of motor sequence learning results in greater integration within a cortico-striatal functional network

Off-line consolidation of motor sequence learning results in greater integration within a cortico-striatal functional network | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

According to researchers at the University of Montreal, the regions of the brain below the cortex play an important role as we train our bodies' movements and, critically, they interact more effectively after a night of sleep. While researchers knew that sleep helped us the learn sequences of movements (motor learning), it was not known why. "The subcortical regions are important in information consolidation, especially information linked to a motor memory trace. When consolidation level is measured after a period of sleep, the brain network of these areas functions with greater synchrony, that is, we observe that communication between the various regions of this network is better optimized. The opposite is true when there has been no period of sleep," said Karen Debas, neuropsychologist at the University of Montreal and leader author of the study. A network refers to multiple brain areas that are activated simultaneously. To achieve these results, the researchers, led by Dr. Julien Doyon, Scientific Director of the Functional Neuroimaging Unit of the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal Research Centre, taught a group of subjects a new sequence of piano-type finger movements on a box. The brains of the subjects were observed using functional magnetic resonance imaging during their performance of the task before and after a period of sleep. Meanwhile, the same test was performed by a control group at the beginning and end of the day, without a period of sleep. - See more at: http://www.neuroscientistnews.com/research-news/learning-play-piano-sleep-it#sthash.GPViQAZq.dpuf


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Responsive Neurological Stimulation and the Neuropace RNS System

Responsive Neurological Stimulation and the Neuropace RNS System | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Jose Cavazos, MD, Professor of Medicine – Neurology & Physiology, Associate Professor of Pharmacology at University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, discusses responsive neurological stimulation (RNS) and how it works.
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Cooperation shapes abilities of the human brain

Cooperation shapes abilities of the human brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Chimpanzees are regarded as more intelligent than marmosets. Yet, like humans, it is marmosets that will often come to the aid of their fellow group members, even unprompted.
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How nerve cells communicate with each other over long distances: Travelling by resonance

How nerve cells communicate with each other over long distances: Travelling by resonance | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
How nerve cells within the brain communicate with each other over long distances has puzzled scientists for decades.
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The nose knows: How to pick your friends

The nose knows: How to pick your friends | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
We all have that friend. Let's call her Jane. Jane is bubbly and
gregarious. Jane doesn't attend a party, she manifests it. She seeks out
social gatherings and is enlivened by human presence. Jane is a good
listener and has many trusted friends. What can explain Jane's
extroversion? The answer, astonishingly, is her attraction to human body
odor. 

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We feel, therefore we learn: The neuroscience of social emotion. Daniel Siegel - YouTube

Presenting at the Mind and its Potential conference, Dr Daniel Siegel MD speaks about Interpersonal Neurobiology, an interdisciplinary view of life experienc...

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Talking to Strangers Makes You Happy

Talking to Strangers Makes You Happy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People who had to strike up conversations on a subway later reported feeling happier than those who didn’t. Christie Nicholson reports.
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DARPA’s tiny implants will hook directly into your nervous system, treat diseases and depression without medication | ExtremeTech

DARPA’s tiny implants will hook directly into your nervous system, treat diseases and depression without medication | ExtremeTech | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

DARPA, on the back of the US government's BRAIN program, has begun the development of tiny electronic implants that interface directly with your nervous system and can directly control and regulate many different diseases and chronic conditions,...


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Love is all you need! Happy relationships help people thrive

Love is all you need! Happy relationships help people thrive | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists from Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh and University of California, said ‘thriving’ involves five components of wellbeing, including learning new skills (stock image pictured).

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Memories may be rewired in the brain

Memories may be rewired in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Memories might feel like they're forever, but two new studies on rodents suggest that it's possible to physically rewire or erase memories in the brain.

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Changing Memories to Treat PTSD

Changing Memories to Treat PTSD | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A controversial area of brain research suggests it may be possible—but is it ethical?

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Increased risk of stroke in people with cognitive impairment

Increased risk of stroke in people with cognitive impairment | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People with cognitive impairment are significantly more likely to have a stroke, with a 39% increased risk, than people with normal cognitive function, according to a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
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How Things Work: Neuroscience studies explain why humans experience empathy

How Things Work: Neuroscience studies explain why humans experience empathy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

By understanding the neurological basis for empathy, better interventions can be constructed to treat patients who suffer from psychopathy.


Studies have shown that almost a quarter of prison populations are psychopathic, compared to only one percent of the general population. Improved treatments and understanding could help bring down crime and violence.


Our understanding of the brain and its functions are very primitive, but much has been learned about the unique complexity that allows our brain to experience our own lives as well as the lives of those around us.


Raghunandan Avula


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The Neuroscience of Fairness and Injustice

The Neuroscience of Fairness and Injustice | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
How Our Brains Are Wired to Resist Unfair Treatment

Humans are inherently social beings. We care not only about material and financial rewards, but also about social status, belonging, and respect. Research studies show that our brains automatically evaluate the fairness of how financial rewards are distributed. We seem to have a happiness response to fair treatment and a disgust or protest response to unfairness. Thisbrain wiring has implications for life happiness, relationship satisfaction, raising kids, and organizational leadership.  This article will examine how we define fairness, how your brain processes experiences of fairness and unfairness, and how to cope with life’s unfair moments..

 


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Eli Levine's curator insight, August 23, 9:37 AM

An addendum to this should be that we resist what we each and all define as injustice, unfairness, and tyranny.  The definition of these things are objectively subjective, which is how we get differences of opinion and belief.  However, there are some things that are common to us all, and one has to wonder at the definitions of some other people, as to whether or not their definitions match up with what the collective actually is feeling.

 

For example, conservatives and Libertarians can be living in absolute poverty, and think it unfair that richer people be taxed more to help raise them out of poverty.  Economically, it's impossible to lift oneself up by your own bootstraps alone, without someone providing you boots to do so.  You can't get something from nothing, and that's what some conservatives and Libertarians have.  So, not only are they incorrect about how the economy works, but they're also advocating policy that many more of us would find unjust and unfair when phrased explicitly and honestly to the public.  You can change people's stated opinions through manipulation of the question phrases.  However, you usually can't and don't change the deep, complicated sentiments that most people have without having some kind of "aha" moment that is endogenous to themselves.  Enlightenment is not a gift that can be given.  It has to be produced from within you based on your actions, attitudes, behaviors, and experiences.

 

Therefore, it is primarily through this confusion of fact and manipulation of phrasing, ignorance, and plain callousness that we get differing opinions as to what fair is in many cases.  Some variety is ok.  However, the extremes of difference that we're experiencing do not reflect the common reality in which we are living.  The actual consequences that are realized from the conservative and Libertarian approach would not be supported by the majority opinion (when asked honestly and explicitly) because most of us have a different and more accurate understanding of fairness.  Quite frankly, I don't know how it is that we spend so much time caught up with individuals who don't know, don't care to know, and refuse to accept the common reality around them for the sake of a presupposed, manufactured and highly inaccurate perception of the world, with the unworkable and unjust opinions and conclusions that follow from their distorted view of the world.  It's time that we ideologically ditch all ideologies, ideologues, and people whose opinions don't match the common reality; people who refuse to accept the common reality, even when it is clearly presented to them.  They will get us killed, in the long term, because they are like bats who do not have properly functioning echo location senses.  They will fly us all into trees, into water, into the ground, or into some hungry predator's mouth, because they've presupposed the reality and are dug into those presuppositions, rather than attentive to the reality itself that is around them.

 

I don't want to die because of these people.  Do you?

M. Philip Oliver's curator insight, August 25, 7:30 PM

Thanks to Alessandro