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Experts in emotion: Yale University

The EIE Series provides a unique opportunity to explore the mysteries of human emotion guided by some of the world's foremost experts on the subject, ranging from distinguished academics to leading figures behind social media services like Facebook. In addition to tackling central questions such as what emotions are, why we have them, and how our understanding of them can lead to happier and healthier lives. You'll also hear first-hand about what first led these key players to study emotion and what they see as the most exciting frontiers ahead.

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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Memories May Not Live in Neurons’ Synapses

Memories May Not Live in Neurons’ Synapses | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The finding could mean recollections are more enduring than expected and disrupt plans for PTSD treatments
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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HIV can reach patients’ brains early in infection and evolve separate stronghold there: NIH study

HIV can reach patients’ brains early in infection and evolve separate stronghold there: NIH study | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists are finding that the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) can evolve and replicate itself inside patients’ brains — establishing a treatment-resistant viral outpost — even early in the infection process.
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How the Brain Switches Strategies to Find Better Solutions

How the Brain Switches Strategies to Find Better Solutions | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers explore how the brain is able to switch from an ongoing strategy to a new, more efficient one.
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A wirelessly controlled implantable LED system for deep brain optogenetic stimulation | Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience

n recent years optogenetics has rapidly become an essential technique in neuroscience. Its temporal and spatial specificity, combined with efficacy in manipulating neuronal activity, are especially useful in studying the behavior of awake behaving animals. Conventional optogenetics, however, requires the use of lasers and optic fibers, which can place considerable restrictions on behavior. Here we combined a wirelessly controlled interface and small implantable light-emitting diode (LED) that allows flexible and precise placement of light source to illuminate any brain area. We tested this wireless LED system in vivo, in transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin-2 in striatonigral neurons expressing D1-like dopamine receptors. In all mice tested, we were able to elicit movements reliably. The frequency of twitches induced by high power stimulation is proportional to the frequency of stimulation. At lower power, contraversive turning was observed. Moreover, the implanted LED remains effective over 50 days after surgery, demonstrating the long-term stability of the light source. Our results show that the wireless LED system can be used to manipulate neural activity chronically in behaving mice without impeding natural movements.
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Genomewide Screen of Learning in Zebrafish Identifies Enzyme Important in Neural Circuit

Genomewide Screen of Learning in Zebrafish Identifies Enzyme Important in Neural Circuit | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers identify a set of genes which, in a zebrafish model, appear to be important for learning.
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The 'compassion pill' that lets you feel other people's pain

The 'compassion pill' that lets you feel other people's pain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Scientists are developing a pill that can artificially produce feelings of kindness. The drug works by changing the neurochemical balance in the prefrontal cortex of the brain, which is responsible for personality, social behaviour and decision-making

The pill that lets you sense other people's pain: 'Compassion drug' produces feelings of empathy - and may help treat addiction

  • US study gave people either a placebo or a dose of drug tolcapone
  • Tolcapone changes the chemical balance in brain's prefrontal cortex
  • This area impacts personality, social behaviour and decision-making 
  • Tolcapone test subjects divided money with strangers in a fairer way


By ELLIE ZOLFAGHARIFARD


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Behavioral Social Neuroscience Seminar Series | www.hss.caltech.edu

Patience and the Wealth of Nations
Armin Falk, Director, Center for Economics and Neuroscience, University of Bonn
Contact Jenny Niese jenny@caltech.edu at 626-395-6010
Event Sponsors: 
Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences
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Neuropsychology study shows power naps boost memory performance

Neuropsychology study shows power naps boost memory performance | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Generations of school students have gone to bed the night before a maths exam or a vocabulary test with their algebra book or vocabulary notes tucked under their pillow in the hope that the knowledge would somehow be magically transferred into...
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New MIND diet may significantly protect against Alzheimer's disease

New MIND diet may significantly protect against Alzheimer's disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new diet, appropriately known by the acronym MIND, could significantly lower a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, even if the diet is not meticulously followed, according to a paper published online for subscribers in March in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's ...
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New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function

New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of neurotoxic amyloid plaques - structures that are responsible for memory loss and a decline in cognitive function in Alzheimer’s patients. If a...

Via Velvet Martin
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Alzheimer’s breakthrough uses ultrasound technology to break up neurotoxic amyloid plaques

Alzheimer’s breakthrough uses ultrasound technology to break up neurotoxic amyloid plaques | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Queensland scientists have found that non-invasive ultrasound technology can be used to treat Alzheimer’s disease and restore memory.
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Magnets and Nanoparticles for Deep Brain Stimulation

Magnets and Nanoparticles for Deep Brain Stimulation | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers develop a new technique to stimulate brain tissue by injecting magnetic nanoparticles and using external magnetic fields.
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When attention is a deficit: How the brain switches strategies to find better solutions

When attention is a deficit: How the brain switches strategies to find better solutions | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Sometimes being too focused on a task is not a good thing. During tasks that require our attention, we might become so engrossed in what we are doing that we fail to notice there is a better way to get the job done.
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High-Fat Diet May Alter Behavior And Brain: Gut Bacteria May Increase Anxiety, Impaired Memory

High-Fat Diet May Alter Behavior And Brain: Gut Bacteria May Increase Anxiety, Impaired Memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
High-fat foods alter mice's behavior more than a normal or control diet.
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Watching a paradigm shift in neuroscience

Watching a paradigm shift in neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
When I finished my PhD 15 years ago, the neurosciences defined the main function of brains in terms of processing input to compute output: “brain function is ultimately best understood in terms of ...
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Magnetic nanoparticles open blood-brain barrier for delivery of therapeutic molecules

Magnetic nanoparticles open blood-brain barrier for delivery of therapeutic molecules | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The blood-brain barrier is a highly selective semipermeable barrier running inside almost all vessels in the brain that lets through water, some gases and a few other select molecules, while preventing potentially toxic elements in the blood from...
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Novel Mechanism That Drives Progression of Frontotemporal Dementia Identified

Novel Mechanism That Drives Progression of Frontotemporal Dementia Identified | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers uncover mechanism which controls synaptic growth and causes them to overgrow.
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British Psychological Society report challenges received wisdom about psychosis and schizophrenia - PsyPost

British Psychological Society report challenges received wisdom about psychosis and schizophrenia - PsyPost | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
March 21st, 2015 will see the US launch of the British Psychological Society's Division of Clinical Psychology's ground-breaking report 'Understanding Psyc ...
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There’s a Mysterious ‘Sleeping Disease’ Perplexing Scientists and Doctors

There’s a Mysterious ‘Sleeping Disease’ Perplexing Scientists and Doctors | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Shutterstock)
Residents of a small village in Kazakhstan are being relocated due to a mysterious illness that has been causing people’s brains to “switch off” and go into comas for the past 2 years.

Via CineversityTV
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The anterior insula shows heightened interictal intrinsic connectivity in migraine without aura

The anterior insula shows heightened interictal intrinsic connectivity in migraine without aura | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Objective: We sought to explore whether patients with migraine show heightened interictal intrinsic connectivity within primary sensory networks, the salience network, and a network anchored by the dorsal pons, a region known to be active during migraine attacks.

Methods: Using task-free fMRI and a region-of-interest analysis, we compared intrinsic connectivity patterns in 15 migraineurs without aura to 15 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, focusing on networks anchored by the calcarine cortex, Heschl gyrus, right anterior insula, and dorsal pons, a region active during migraine attacks. We also examined the relationship between network connectivity, migraine frequency, and sensory sensitivity symptoms.

Results: Migraineurs showed increased connectivity between primary visual and auditory cortices and the right dorsal anterior insula, between the dorsal pons and the bilateral anterior insulae, and between the right and left ventral anterior insulae. Increased connectivity showed no clinical correlation with migraine frequency or sensory sensitivity.

Conclusions: Patients with migraine display interictal changes in the topology of intrinsic connections, with greater connectivity between primary sensory cortices, the pons, and the anterior insula, a region involved in representing and coordinating responses to emotional salience.
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Hugs produce oxytocin. Oxytocin makes us more empathetic towards others.

Hugs produce oxytocin. Oxytocin makes us more empathetic towards others. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Oxytocin is a hormone that doubles as a neurotransmitter and is responsible for many behaviors, most of which are associated with love.


According to PsychCentral, oxytocin aids in these actions:

  • Sexual arousal
  • Bonding
  • Maternal behavior
  • Relaxation
  • An increase in trust
  • A decrease in fear
  • An increase in generosity and empathy
  • Facilitates childbirth and breastfeeding


One of the most common feelings that results from oxytocin is empathy.  A study conducted by Jorge A. Barraza and Paul J. Zak “found that empathy was associated with a 47% increase in oxytocin from baseline.”


When a person is put in a situation where they must work together or any other type of bonding exercise, oxytocin is released.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Scientists make surprising finding in stroke research

Scientists make surprising finding in stroke research | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists at The University of Manchester have made an important new discovery about the brain's immune system that could lead to potential new treatments for stroke and other related conditions.
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Mind cloning: Imagining the brain at the 10 micron scale with subcellular resolution MRI | ExtremeTech

Mind cloning: Imagining the brain at the 10 micron scale with subcellular resolution MRI | ExtremeTech | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Florida have recently found a way to extend the resolution of noninvasive MRI down to the 10um range, flying in the face of the unwritten Moore's law of MRI.


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Analysis of Worm Neurons Suggests How a Single Stimulus Can Trigger Different Responses

Analysis of Worm Neurons Suggests How a Single Stimulus Can Trigger Different Responses | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers offer an explanation of how a single stimulus can sometimes trigger a different response, even in the same individual.
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