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Tanya Luhrmann, hearing voices in Accra and Chenai | Neuroanthropology

Tanya Luhrmann, hearing voices in Accra and Chenai | Neuroanthropology | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

My post on Tanya Luhrmann's research on cultural variation across cultures. Based on her presentation to the Culture, Mind & Brain Conference in LA 2012, which was delivered by video.


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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Slimy fish and the origins of brain development

Slimy fish and the origins of brain development | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Lamprey—slimy, eel-like parasitic fish with tooth-riddled, jawless sucking mouths—are rather disgusting to look at, but thanks to their important position on the vertebrate family tree, they can offer important insights about the evolutionary...
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Smoking and schizophrenia linked by alterations in brain nicotine signals

Smoking and schizophrenia linked by alterations in brain nicotine signals | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Schizophrenia is associated with increased rates and intensity of tobacco smoking.
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Neuroimaging technique identifies concussion-related brain disease in living brain

Neuroimaging technique identifies concussion-related brain disease in living brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
An experimental positron emission tomography (PET) tracer is effective in diagnosing concussion-related brain disease while a person is still alive, according to a case study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and at...
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Vitamin B1 deficiency can cause brain damage, says study - Economic Times

Vitamin B1 deficiency can cause brain damage, says study - Economic Times | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Economic Times
Vitamin B1 deficiency can cause brain damage, says study
Economic Times
Other KS symptoms can include apathy, anxiety and confabulation (fabricating imaginary experiences to compensate for memory loss), researchers said.
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EEG Study Findings Reveal How Fear is Processed in the Brain

EEG Study Findings Reveal How Fear is Processed in the Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new EEG study illustrates how fear arises in the brain when people are exposed to threatening images.
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Neuroscience Provides Clues To Organization

Neuroscience Provides Clues To Organization | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
We’ve all heard the conventional wisdom for better managing our time and organizing our professional and personal lives. 

We’ve all heard the conventional wisdom for better managing our time and organizing our professional and personal lives. Don’t try to multitask. Turn off the email and Facebook alerts. But what’s grounded in real evidence and what’s not? In his new book The Organized Mind, Daniel Levitin — a McGill University professor of psychology and behavioral neuroscience — explores how having a basic understanding of the way the brain works can help us think about organizing our homes, our businesses, our time and even our schools in an age of information overload. We spoke with Levitin about his work. This interview has been edited for length and clarity. Question: What was your goal in writing this book? Answer: Neuroscientists have learned a lot in the last 10 or 15 years about how the brain organizes information, and why we pay attention to some things and forget others. But most of this information hasn’t trickled down to the average reader. There are a lot of books about how to get organized and a lot of books about how to be better and more productive at business, but I don’t know of one that grounds any of these in the science. From the book, you seem to be a fan of David Allen, the time management guru. Does his Getting Things Donesystem have a real basis in neuroscience? 


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Neuroscientists reverse memories’ emotional associations

Neuroscientists reverse memories’ emotional associations | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
MIT study also identifies the brain circuit that links feelings to memories. 

Most memories have some kind of emotion associated with them: Recalling the week you just spent at the beach probably makes you feel happy, while reflecting on being bullied provokes more negative feelings.

A new study from MIT neuroscientists reveals the brain circuit that controls how memories become linked with positive or negative emotions. Furthermore, the researchers found that they could reverse the emotional association of specific memories by manipulating brain cells with optogenetics — a technique that uses light to control neuron activity.

The findings, described in the Aug. 27 issue of Nature, demonstrated that a neuronal circuit connecting the hippocampus and the amygdala plays a critical role in associating emotion with memory. This circuit could offer a target for new drugs to help treat conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, the researchers say.

“In the future, one may be able to develop methods that help people to remember positive memories more strongly than negative ones,” says Susumu Tonegawa, the Picower Professor of Biology and Neuroscience, director of the RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics at MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, and senior author of the paper. 


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Zebrafish Model of a Learning and Memory Disorder Shows Better Way to Target Treatment

Zebrafish Model of a Learning and Memory Disorder Shows Better Way to Target Treatment | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers report the learning and memory deficits associated with neurofibromatosis are distinct features which require different treatment approaches.
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Brain inflammation dramatically disrupts memory retrieval networks, study finds

Brain inflammation dramatically disrupts memory retrieval networks, study finds | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Brain inflammation can rapidly disrupt our ability to retrieve complex memories of similar but distinct experiences, according to scientists.
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Brain Inflammation Dramatically Disrupts Memory Retrieval Networks

Brain Inflammation Dramatically Disrupts Memory Retrieval Networks | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

A new study provides additional insight into the cognitive losses often seen as a result of chemotherapy and in some autoimmune diseases.


Brain inflammation can rapidly disrupt our ability to retrieve complex memories of similar but distinct experiences, according to UC Irvine neuroscientists Jennifer Czerniawski and John Guzowski.

Their study – which appears today in The Journal of Neuroscience – specifically identifies how immune system signaling molecules, called cytokines, impair communication among neurons in the hippocampus, an area of the brain critical for discrimination memory. The findings offer insight into why cognitive deficits occurs in people undergoing chemotherapy and those with autoimmune or neurodegenerative diseases.

 

Increased cytokine levels in the hippocampus only affected complex discrimination memory, the type that lets us differentiate among generally similar experiences – what we did at work or ate at dinner, for example. The image is for illustrative purposes only and shows a hippocampal brain slice from a rat. Credit Semiconscious.


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Promising Canadian stroke drug receives large research grant

Promising Canadian stroke drug receives large research grant | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
NA-1 drug, which aims to prevent harmful toxins in recent stroke victims, gets $6.6-million from Brain Canada

 

A Phase III trial involving a promising stroke drug will receive a $6.6-million injection from Brain Canada – yet another endorsement for a Canadian medication that takes aim at the country’s third leading cause of death.

The intravenous medication, called NA-1, is the $30-million, private venture of a company called NoNO Inc. Its development, nearly 20 years in the making, is unusual: It is neither in bed with a large pharmaceutical company nor has it relied on the largesse of the public purse. The brainchild of neurosurgeon Mike Tymianski of Toronto Western Hospital, the drug will be administered by paramedics to 518 stroke patients in a field program called FRONTIER, which rolls out in ambulances in the GTA, Peel Region and Vancouver next January.


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Compound protects brain cells after traumatic brain injury

Compound protects brain cells after traumatic brain injury | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A new class of compounds has now been shown to protect brain cells from the type of damage caused by blast-mediated traumatic brain injury (TBI).
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Scientists map white matter connections within the human brain

Scientists map white matter connections within the human brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—To see, think or feel, the 100 billion neurons in our brain must exchange messages.
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The Brain Stimulation Program at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland

The Brain Stimulation Program at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive method of brain stimulation used to treat major depression in the Johns Hopkins Brain Stimulation Program.
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Researchers debunk myth about Parkinson’s: There’s no lack of dopamine

Researchers debunk myth about Parkinson’s: There’s no lack of dopamine | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Using advanced computer models, neuroscience researchers at the University of Copenhagen have gained new knowledge about the complex processes that cause Parkinson’s disease.
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Scientists Discover New Sleep Node in the Brain

Scientists Discover New Sleep Node in the Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers identify 'sleep node' in the mammalian brain. Its activity appears to be necessary and sufficient to produce deep sleep.

 

Using designer genes, researchers at UB and Harvard were able to ‘turn on’ specific neurons in the brainstem that result in deep sleep. Credit University at Buffalo.


Findings may lead to new therapies for sleep disorders, including insomnia.


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Julien Cuyeu's curator insight, September 17, 11:33 AM

If I could turn on my GABA inhibitors to go sleep instantly, I would be a happy person every time.

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Researchers find neural compensation in people with Alzheimer’s-related protein

Researchers find neural compensation in people with Alzheimer’s-related protein | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The human brain is capable of a neural workaround that compensates for the buildup of beta-amyloid, a destructive protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley.
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The rise of emotional awareness

The rise of emotional awareness | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Our emotions are subject to the ebbs and flow of daily life. Even the subtlest differences in our environments can have a visceral effect on our emotional state and interactions, with new tools and sensor quantifying by exactly how much.

New systems are being developed which use sensors and advanced algorithms to understand, react to and even anticipate our moods and emotional states.

These technologies have a built-in emotional responsiveness that will change the way we think of interactivity, allowing us to connect with our surroundings, with each other and even with ourselves, in an exciting and dynamic new way.

Margaret Morris, research scientist at Intel Labs, has explored the intersection of technology and emotions, examining how computing devices might enhance our personal and professional relationships. In the interview below, Morris talks about what it means to allow technology to get to know us and how will it can help us learn more about ourselves.

 


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Sleeping brains can process and respond to words - health - 11 September 2014 - New Scientist

Sleeping brains can process and respond to words - health - 11 September 2014 - New Scientist | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Our brains can categorise words and prepare physical responses to them while we sleep, highlighting just how awake some of our brain regions are as we
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How is thought translated into molecular changes in brain cells? - Another Form of Neuroplasticity by Switching Glutamate NMDA Subunits

How is thought translated into molecular changes in brain cells? -  Another Form of Neuroplasticity by Switching Glutamate NMDA Subunits | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Perhaps the most significant new discovery of how mental events trigger brain change is another form of neuroplasticity by switching Glutamate NMDA Subunits
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Tipping the Balance of Behavior

Tipping the Balance of Behavior | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers discover antagonistic neuron populations in the amygdala of mice which controls whether the animals engage in social behavior or asocial repetitive self grooming.
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Gray matter matters when measuring risk tolerance: May explain why risk tolerance decreases with age

The gray matter volume of a region in the right posterior parietal cortex is significantly predictive of individual risk attitudes, new research has found.
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Sleep Disorders Widely Undiagnosed in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

Sleep Disorders Widely Undiagnosed in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Fatigue associated with MS could be the result of widely undiagnosed sleep disorders, a new study reports.

 

In what may be the largest study of sleep problems among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), researchers at UC Davis have found that widely undiagnosed sleep disorders may be at the root of the most common and disabling symptom of the disease: fatigue.


Conducted in over 2,300 individuals in Northern California with multiple sclerosis, the large, population-based study found that, overall, more than 70 percent of participants screened positive for one or more sleep disorders.

The research highlights the importance of diagnosing the root causes of fatigue among individuals with MS, as sleep disorders may affect the course of the disease as well as the overall health and well-being of sufferers, the authors said.


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Not enough vitamin B1 can cause brain damage

Not enough vitamin B1 can cause brain damage | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A deficiency of a single vitamin, B1 (thiamine), can cause a potentially fatal brain disorder called Wernicke encephalopathy.
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Team discovers neurochemical imbalance in schizophrenia

Team discovers neurochemical imbalance in schizophrenia | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California, San Diego have discovered that neurons from patients with schizophrenia secrete higher amounts of...
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