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The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow...

The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow... | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow of energy and information between people, essential in our development
“The study of neuroplasticity is changing the way scientists think about the...

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VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG's curator insight, February 26, 2013 2:28 AM
"...we can learn to be open in an authentic way to others, and to ourselves. The outcome of such an integrative presence is not only a sense of deep well-being and compassion for ourselves and others, but also an opening of the doors of awareness to a sense of the interdependence of everything. ‘We’ are indeed a part of an interconnected whole.” ~Dr. Daniel Siegel
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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How to Be a Better Listener

How to Be a Better Listener | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Couples often come in and say, “We need help with our communication,” and the presumption is that they need to become better communicators–by which they mean better talkers. But the best thing you can do for your relationship is become a better listener.


Here are some tips for improving your listening with everyone in your life–your partner, friends, colleagues, kids. They’ll all benefit, and so will you.1)  Notice when you’re just waiting to talk.


Learn more:


- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Listen+to+Me+with+Your+Eyes



Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Roger Francis, Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 2, 1:28 AM

Couples often come in and say, “We need help with our communication,” and the presumption is that they need to become better communicators–by which they mean better talkers. But the best thing you can do for your relationship is become a better listener.


Here are some tips for improving your listening with everyone in your life–your partner, friends, colleagues, kids. They’ll all benefit, and so will you.1)  Notice when you’re just waiting to talk.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Listen+to+Me+with+Your+Eyes


Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Compassion & Mindfulness Research
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Affective and physiological responses to the suffering of others: Compassion and vagal activity.

Affective and physiological responses to the suffering of others: Compassion and vagal activity. | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Compassion is an affective response to another's suffering and a catalyst of prosocial behavior. In the present studies, we explore the peripheral physiological changes associated with the experience of compassion. Guided by long-standing theoretical claims, we propose that compassion is associated with activation in the parasympathetic autonomic nervous system through the vagus nerve. Across 4 studies, participants witnessed others suffer while we recorded physiological measures, including heart rate, respiration, skin conductance, and a measure of vagal activity called respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Participants exhibited greater RSA during the compassion induction compared with a neutral control (Study 1), another positive emotion (Study 2), and a prosocial emotion lacking appraisals of another person's suffering (Study 3). Greater RSA during the experience of compassion compared with the neutral or control emotion was often accompanied by lower heart rate and respiration but no difference in skin conductance. In Study 4, increases in RSA during compassion positively predicted an established composite of compassion-related words, continuous self-reports of compassion, and nonverbal displays of compassion. Compassion, a core affective component of empathy and prosociality, is associated with heightened parasympathetic activity.


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Dr James Hawkins's curator insight, May 30, 1:21 AM

More work showing links between compassion, the vagus nerve & parasympathetic nervous system activity.

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Rest Prepares the Brain for Social Interaction

A new study reports that even during periods of rest, our brain is preparing us to socially connect with others.
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Brain Circuitry That Controls Anxiety Provoking Decisions Identified

Brain Circuitry That Controls Anxiety Provoking Decisions Identified | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

"This image illustrates nerve fibers that originate in a part of the prefrontal cortex associated with emotion. The green shows the termination of fibers from a part of the prefrontal cortex in the striatum; the red depicts striosomes; and the yellow shows their overlap. The researchers found that the striatum — particularly the striosomes — may act as a gatekeeper that processes sensory and emotional information from the cortex to produce a decision on how to react. Image credit: The researchers."

 

"Findings could have implications for treating psychiatric disorders that feature impaired decision making."


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Imaging Test Might Identify Biomarker of Alzheimer's Disease - Healthline

Imaging Test Might Identify Biomarker of Alzheimer's Disease - Healthline | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Scientists say deteriorating white matter in the brain could be an early indicator of Alzheimer’s.

 

A study published in Radiology concludes that white matter plays an important role in how the disease strikes and progresses.

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) creates abnormal deposits of proteins that form amyloid plaques and tau tangles throughout the brain. It is also characterized by a loss of neurons, a process that causes brain tissue to shrink.


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Cognitive impairment predicts worse outcome in heart failure

Cognitive impairment predicts worse outcome in elderly heart failure patients, reveals research. Patients with cognitive impairment had a 7.5 times greater risk of call cause death and heart failure readmission.
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Peeking into healthy brains to see if Alzheimer's is brewing

Peeking into healthy brains to see if Alzheimer's is brewing | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Sticky plaque gets the most attention, but now healthy seniors at risk of Alzheimer's are letting scientists peek into their brains to see if another culprit is lurking.
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Aphios alpha (α)-secretase modulator APH-1104 for Alzheimer's disease

Aphios alpha (α)-secretase modulator APH-1104 for Alzheimer's disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Alpha (α)-secretase is another enzyme in the neuronal pathway that positively influences amyloid precursor protein, ('APP') processing. Both β-secretase and γ-secretase cleave APP to form insoluble amyloid plaques (Aβ) that set in motion tau fiber assembly. In contrast, α-secretase cleaves APP into the harmless and more soluble product, 'sAPP-α', that actually supports new synapse formation and is more readily cleared from the brain. Thus, unlike current strategies which aim to suppress Aβ plaque formation by minimizing β- and γ-secretase activities, our strategy to activate α-secretase effectively eliminates the substrate for β- amyloid generation, and at the same time leads to positive amyloid precursor processing to both prevent and reduce Aβ plaques in AD.

APH-1104, a Novel α-Secretase Modulator and Potential AD TherapeuticAphios is developing APH-1104, a more potent analog of Bryostatin-1, which is neuroprotective by α-secretase activation via novel PKC isoforms, down-regulation of pro-inflammatory and angiogenic processes and the substitution of β-amyloid for its soluble and harmless relative, s-APPα. Aphios has successfully developed and patented efficient methods for manufacturing and formulating APH-1104. In 2008, Aphios investigated APH-0703, a less potent analog of APH-1104, as an intravenous formulation for Alzheimer's disease in an open label n=1 clinical trial in the Bahamas. Although limited, the preliminary results of this exploratory study were striking and encouraging.


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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, May 23, 12:22 PM

Current research in AD prophylaxis and therapy is centered on identification of methods to decrease Beta amyloid (Aβ) and the assembly of tau tangles, biochemical 'signatures' of AD which are the basis cognitive decline. Beta (β)-secretase inhibitors have been extensively investigated, but have been difficult to translate into effective clinical treatments for AD. A recent Phase II AD clinical trial with the β-secretase inhibitor, LY2886721, was even halted because of liver toxicity. Gamma (γ)-secretase inhibitors may conceivably also reduce Aβ accumulation. However, a recent Phase III clinical trial with the γ-secretase inhibitor, 'Semagacestat' (LY-450139), was also halted because of evidence for accelerated AD dementia. Most of the recent clinical AD trial failures have been with β- and γ-secretase inhibitors.

 

We will develop APH-1104 as a therapeutic for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cognitive disorders (CD). We plan to utilize other analogs of APH-0703 as backups for APH-1104. Our milestones are as follows: (1) establish cGMP for the API and FDP at the pilot-scale level; (2) establish a drug master file, design IND enabling preclinical studies and Phase I/IIa clinical trials, and draft IND package; (3) conduct FDA-necessary IND-enabling preclinical in vivo studies, including toxicology, efficacy and pharmacology, under GLP; (4) perform stability testing of API and FDP under GLP; (5) file IND for conducting Phase I/IIa clinical trial of APH-1104; and (6) conduct Phase I and IIa clinical trials of oral APH-1104.

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People with depression may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease

People with depression may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People with depression may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, according to a large study published in the May 20, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Elite athletes' brains 82 percent faster

Elite athletes' brains 82 percent faster | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Elite athletes are blessed with an area of the brain that performs 82 percent faster than average under intense pressure, a study published on Wednesday claims.
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Blood Pressure Control and Cognitive Performance

JAMA NeurologyMidlife Hypertension and 20-Year Cognitive Change: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Neurocognitive StudyRebecca F. Gottesman, MD, PhD; Andrea L. C.

 

Results During 20 years, baseline hypertension was associated with an additional decline of 0.056 global z score points (95% CI, −0.100 to −0.012) and prehypertension was associated nonsignificantly with 0.040 more global z score points of decline (95% CI, −0.085 to 0.005) compared with normal BP. Individuals with hypertension who used antihypertensives had less decline during the 20 years than untreated individuals with hypertension (−0.050 [95% CI, −0.003 to −0.097] vs −0.079 [95% CI, −0.156 to −0.002] global z score points). Having a JNC-8–specified indication for initiating antihypertensive treatment at baseline was associated with a greater 20-year decline (−0.044 [95% CI, −0.085 to −0.003] global z score points) than not having an indication. We observed effect modification by race for the continuous systolic BP analyses (P = .01), with each 20–mm Hg increment at baseline associated with an additional decline of 0.048 (95% CI, −0.074 to −0.022) points in global cognitive zscore in whites but not in African Americans (decline, −0.020 [95% CI, −0.026 to 0.066] points). Systolic BP at the end of follow-up was not associated with the preceding 20 years of cognitive change in either group. Methods to account for bias owing to attrition strengthened the magnitude of some associations.

Conclusions and Relevance Midlife hypertension and elevated midlife but not late-life systolic BP was associated with more cognitive decline during the 20 years of the study. Greater decline is found with higher midlife BP in whites than in African Americans.

JAMA Neurol. 2014;71(10):1218-1227. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2014.1646


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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, May 20, 12:05 AM
From the JAMA Network | May 19, 2015Blood Pressure Control and Cognitive PerformanceSomething to Think About With AgingCharles DeCarli, MD1[+] Author AffiliationsJAMA. 2015;313(19):1963-1964. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.3113.
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FDA Approves INVEGA TRINZA™, First and Only Four-Times-A-Year Treatment for Schizophrenia | Johnson & Johnson

FDA Approves INVEGA TRINZA™, First and Only Four-Times-A-Year Treatment for Schizophrenia | Johnson & Johnson | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

TITUSVILLE, N.J., May 19, 2015 – There’s a new treatment option for schizophrenia – INVEGA TRINZATM (three-month paliperidone palmitate), the first and only schizophrenia medication to be administered just four times a year, providing the longest dosing interval available.

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved under priority review the New Drug Application (NDA) for the three-month long-acting atypical antipsychotic INVEGA TRINZA™.  INVEGA TRINZA™, a three-month injection, is an atypical antipsychotic indicated to treat schizophrenia.  Before starting INVEGA TRINZA™, patients must be adequately treated with INVEGA SUSTENNA® (one-month paliperidone palmitate) for at least four months. Priority review is a designation for drugs that, if approved, would offer significant improvement in the treatment of serious conditions.

 

In a long-term maintenance trial, 93 percent of patients treated with INVEGA TRINZA™ did not experience a significant return of schizophrenia symptoms. The results of the phase 3 study were published in March by JAMA Psychiatry, a peer-reviewed medical journal published by the American Medical Association. Based on positive efficacy, Janssen concluded this study early following the recommendation of an Independent Data Monitoring Committee (IDMC).


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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, May 20, 2:17 AM

NVEGA TRINZA™ (3- month paliperidone palmitate) is a prescription medicine given by injection every 3 months by a healthcare professional and used to treat schizophrenia. INVEGA TRINZA™ is used in people who have been treated with INVEGA SUSTENNA® (1-month paliperidone palmitate) for at least 4 months.

 

 

Schizophrenia is a complex and chronic brain disorder in which symptoms can be severe and disabling and can affect all aspects of a person’s daily life. With this new treatment option, healthcare providers can give patients greater independence by enabling them to focus less on taking their medication and more on other aspects of their treatment plan.

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A new milestone in non-pharmaceutical treatments for depression | Nick Davis

A new milestone in non-pharmaceutical treatments for depression | Nick Davis | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Nick Davis: Last week’s announcement that a UK company won US approval for device-based treatment of depression is excellent news for taking academic findings into a clinical setting

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Beautiful friendship: Social sharing of emotions improves subjective feelings and activates the neural reward circuitry

Beautiful friendship: Social sharing of emotions improves subjective feelings and activates the neural reward circuitry | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

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Margarita Tarragona's curator insight, May 31, 7:02 PM

Compartir nuestras emociones activa las zonas del cerebro que tienen que ver con las recompensas y nos sentimos mejor. Una razón más por la que es importante tener amigos. #PsicologiaPositiva, #PosPsy

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Researchers clarify role of genetic risk factor in Alzheimer’s

Researchers clarify role of genetic risk factor in Alzheimer’s | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The study sheds light on potential therapeutic targets for treatment of the disease.


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Cerebellum Plays Unexpected Role in the Creative Process

Cerebellum Plays Unexpected Role in the Creative Process | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

"Participants in a study of creativity had their brain activity recorded while drawing words, examples of which can be seen above, or a zigzag line. Image credit: Reiss lab/Scientific Reports."

 

"Researchers find heightened activity in the cerebellum when people embark in creative problem solving tasks."


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malek's comment, May 29, 9:07 AM
an amazing finding, more work is needed.
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Researchers Reactivate Lost Memories With Optogenetics

Researchers Reactivate Lost Memories With Optogenetics | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

"The research dissociates the mechanisms used in memory storage from those of memory retrieval. Image credit: Christine Daniloff/MIT."


"A new study claims researchers have been able to reactivate memories which could not otherwise be retrieved by using optogenetics."


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‘Pain sensing’ gene discovery could help in development of new methods of pain relief

‘Pain sensing’ gene discovery could help in development of new methods of pain relief | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

A gene essential to the production of pain-sensing neurons in humans has been identified by an international team of researchers co-led by the University of Cambridge. The discovery, reported today in the journal Nature Genetics, could have implications for the development of new methods of pain relief.


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Reflections on using Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) to treat neuropsychiatric disorders

Reflections on using Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) to treat neuropsychiatric disorders | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
One of my most fascinating experiences as a doctoral student of neuroscience began with an early morning trip to the university hospital.
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Empathy @goodtherapy.org

Empathy @goodtherapy.org | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Empathy is the ability to recognize and relate to other people’s emotions and thoughts. Empathic thinking is often characterized as the willingness and ability to place oneself in another person’s situation, to feel another person’s feelings, or to recognize that another person might experience feelings in the same way as oneself. Empathy on the part of the therapist for those in therapy is also an important characteristic of therapeutic relationships.


  • Understanding Empathy

  • Empathy and Psychology

  • Role of Empathy in Therapy

  • Five-Point Scale to Measure Empathy

  • Origins of Empathy

  • Empathy in Animals

  • The “Cost of Caring”



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The Neurochemistry of Positive Conversations

The Neurochemistry of Positive Conversations | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
And what managers need to know about negative ones.

Via Annette Schmeling, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Annette Schmeling's curator insight, June 23, 2014 10:18 AM

Being mindful of communication style and the neurochemistry of positive conversations will bring more kindness, compassion and resilience into our world. Judith & Richard Glasser provide thought-provoking research and confirms the power of oxytocin.

 

 

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Juvenile plasticity returned to adult mice brains

Juvenile plasticity returned to adult mice brains | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
By enabling the rigid brains of adult mice to return to the high levels of plasticity found in juvenile brains, scientists are opening new pathways to the treatment of brain injuries such as stroke.
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2015 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures - Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association

2015 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures - Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Abstract

This report discusses the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, costs of care and the overall effect on caregivers and society. It also examines the challenges encountered by health care providers when disclosing an AD diagnosis to patients and caregivers. An estimated 5.3 million Americans have AD; 5.1 million are age ≥65 years, and approximately 200,000 are age <65 years and have younger onset AD. By mid-century, the number of people living with AD in the United States is projected to grow by nearly 10 million, fueled in large part by the aging baby boom generation. Today, someone in the country develops AD every 67 seconds. By 2050, one new case of AD is expected to develop every 33 seconds, resulting in nearly 1 million new cases per year, and the estimated prevalence is expected to range from 11 million to 16 million. In 2013, official death certificates recorded 84,767 deaths from AD, making AD the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans age ≥65 years. Between 2000 and 2013, deaths resulting from heart disease, stroke and prostate cancer decreased 14%, 23% and 11%, respectively, whereas deaths from AD increased 71%. The actual number of deaths to which AD contributes (or deaths with AD) is likely much larger than the number of deaths from AD recorded on death certificates. In 2015, an estimated 700,000 Americans age ≥65 years will die with AD, and many of them will die from complications caused by AD. In 2014, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17.9 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $217 billion. Average per-person Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age ≥65 years with AD and other dementias are more than two and a half times as great as payments for all beneficiaries without these conditions, and Medicaid payments are 19 times as great. Total payments in 2015 for health care, long-term care and hospice services for people age ≥65 years with dementia are expected to be $226 billion. Among people with a diagnosis of AD or another dementia, fewer than half report having been told of the diagnosis by their health care provider. Though the benefits of a prompt, clear and accurate disclosure of an AD diagnosis are recognized by the medical profession, improvements to the disclosure process are needed. These improvements may require stronger support systems for health care providers and their patients.


Via Krishan Maggon
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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, May 20, 1:42 AM
March 2015Volume 11, Issue 3, Pages 332–3842015 Alzheimer's disease facts and figuresAlzheimer's Association*DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2015.02.003 Article Info
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Without This Protein, Part Of The Brain's Sex System Would Die

Without This Protein, Part Of The Brain's Sex System Would Die | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Sometimes, bad luck leads to insights. A study published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation has added a new twist to our understanding of the way the system that controls puberty in mammals develops inside the brain – thanks to two...
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