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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
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This Is Your Brain On The Internet

This Is Your Brain On The Internet | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Is the internet and social media influencing your brain? Documentary filmmaker Tiffany Shlain investigates our changing behaviors in the connected world.

How do media and technology impact our brain? According to a "a recent study, Dr. Small observed brain activity in two groups of subjects interacting with a search engine –one that was 'net-savvy' and one that was 'net naïve'. The results showed increased brain activity in the experienced netizens, reflecting Shlain’s hypothesis that our online behaviors stimulate more brain systems."

For more information and to view a video on "our connected world" click through to the article.


Via Beth Dichter, Tom Perran
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Memory loss associated with Alzheimer's reversed: Small trial succeeds using systems approach to memory disorders

Memory loss associated with Alzheimer's reversed: Small trial succeeds using systems approach to memory disorders | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
In the first, small study of a novel, personalized and comprehensive program to reverse memory loss, nine of 10 participants displayed subjective or objective improvement in their memories beginning within three to six months after the program’s...
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Workshop on Neural Information Dynamics, Causality and Computation near Criticality

LOEWE-NeFF and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS) jointly invite you to a “Workshop on Neural Information Dynamics, Causality and Computation near Criticality” December 12-13th, 2014

The workshop is preceded by a “Software course on Neural Information Dynamics with TRENTOOL, the Java Information Dynamics Toolkit and MuTE” December 10-11th, 2014.

 

Venue: Workshop and student course will be held at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS, www.fias.uni-frankfurt.de), Ruth-Moufang-Straße 1, 60438 Frankfurt, Germany.


The workshop addresses the analysis of neural computation in large neural systems and covers three tightly related topics in the field of modern analysis of neural data:

- Causality

- Neural information dynamics

- Large scale organisation and criticality

 

The supporting software course addresses young scientists who intend to apply information theoretic measures for neuroscience hands on, and that would like to contribute code to one of the open source toolboxes on the topic.

Apply/register before October 24th


Via Complexity Digest
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Scientists Identify the Signature of Aging in the Brain

Scientists Identify the Signature of Aging in the Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers believe their findings could eventually help produce treatments to slow or reverse cognitive decline in older people.
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Stress coping strategies may protect against bipolar disorder recurrence

Researchers have found a link between low levels of resilience to stress in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder and impulsive behaviour, which may make them vulnerable to depressive episodes.
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New research shows schizophrenia comprises 8 genetically distinct disorders

New research shows that schizophrenia isn't a single disease but a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each with its own set of symptoms. The finding could be a first step toward improved diagnosis and treatment for the debilitating psychiatric illness.
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Why Being Vulnerable is the Key to Intimacy - Fulfillment Daily

Why Being Vulnerable is the Key to Intimacy - Fulfillment Daily | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
We want relationships, to find love, but we are so afraid of opening up and being hurt. Research shows that vulnerability - the ability to be open - is the secret to connection.

Via VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG
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Social Anxiety Disorder: Impressive Study Reveals The Very Best Treatment

Social Anxiety Disorder: Impressive Study Reveals The Very Best Treatment | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Large study reveals the most effective treatment for social anxiety disorder.
Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog.
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Unexpected clue to peripheral neuropathies found

Unexpected clue to peripheral neuropathies found | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Disrupting the molecular function of a tumor suppressor causes improper formation of a protective insulating sheath on peripheral nerves -- leading to neuropathy and muscle wasting in mice similar to that in human diabetes and neurodegeneration.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Neurosciences
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Doing a task while asleep

Doing a task while asleep | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

A recent paper (citation below) describes subjects working away at a task, categorizing words, while asleep. Here is the abstract: Falling asleep leads to a loss of sensory awareness and to the ina...


Via LOr
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from the plastic brain
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Long term use of benzodiazepine for anxiety & sleep disorders can increase risk of Alzheimer’s disease

Long term use of benzodiazepine for anxiety & sleep disorders can increase risk of Alzheimer’s disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

This case-control study based on 8980 individuals representative of elderly people living in the community in Quebec showed that the risk of Alzheimer’s disease was increased by 43-51% among those who had used benzodiazepines in the past. Risk increased with density of exposure and when long acting benzodiazepines were used. Further adjustment on symptoms thought to be potential prodromes for dementia—such as depression, anxiety, or sleep disorders—did not meaningfully alter the results.


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Protein interaction is crucial for building networks in the brain

Protein interaction is crucial for building networks in the brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Neural networks are formed by the interconnection of specific neurons in the brain. The molecular mechanisms involved in creating these connections, however, have so far eluded scientists.
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Scientists have decoded the functioning of the short-term memory

Scientists have decoded the functioning of the short-term memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
School children and university students are often big fans of the short-term memory – not least when they have to cram large volumes of information on the eve of an exam.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Bounded Rationality and Beyond
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Recent advances in understanding neural systems that support inhibitory control

Recent advances in understanding neural systems that support inhibitory control | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Highlights: 


  • Right lateral prefrontal cortex plays an important role in inhibitory control.•
  • Recent advances suggest that rIFG may not just be involved in motoric inhibition.


  • Rather rIFG may integrate contextual information with potential goals.
  • Whether inhibitory control uses a central neural system remains unclear.
  • Alternatively, such systems may vary by domain — motoric, cognitive, emotional.


Although it is agreed that the right lateral prefrontal cortex plays a prominent role in inhibitory control, the exact psychological processes it implements remain unclear, as do the precise neural substrates of such control.


Recently debated is the issue of whether the right inferior cortex is specifically involved in inhibition of action, or whether this region monitors the environmental context to provide information as to which goals are attainable under current conditions.


Another issue of debate is whether there is a common neural substrate for inhibitory control or whether different neural systems are involved in inhibitory control in different domains — motoric, cognitive, and emotional. The present review examines the current state of thought on these two important issues.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from The Psychogenyx News Feed
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The Neuroscience of Happiness - YouTube

Is happiness a skill? Modern neuroscientific research and the wisdom of ancient contemplative traditions converge in suggesting that happiness is the product...

Via Luis Valdes
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Research mimics brain cells to boost memory power

Research mimics brain cells to boost memory power | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
RMIT University researchers have brought ultra-fast, nano-scale data storage within striking reach, using technology that mimics the human brain.  
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Brain & Behavior Research Foundation Honors Eight Scientists for
Outstanding Achievements in Psychiatric Research at 27th Annual Dinner

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation Honors Eight Scientists for <br/>Outstanding Achievements in Psychiatric Research at 27th Annual Dinner | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation will honor eight scientists with its 2014 Outstanding Achievement Prizes for work delving into psychiatric disorders that affect one in four people.
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New research illustrates how fear arises in the brain

An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain.
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Lumosity’s #Big Data pushes frontiers of neuroscience

Lumosity’s #Big Data pushes frontiers of neuroscience | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Brain-training startup, Lumosity has revealed findings from its Human Cognition Project, an initiative that gives researchers access to its data to conduct

Via Sandeep Gautam
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, September 29, 12:30 AM

Although the effects of brain training itself are suspect; Lumosity's Big Data can really help advance neuroscience in many ways! Kudos for making that data open and available.

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Violence, mental illness, and the brain - A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 3 - From deep brain stimulation to amygdalotomy for violent behavior, seizures, and pathological aggression in human...

Violence, mental illness, and the brain - A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 3 - From deep brain stimulation to amygdalotomy for violent behavior, seizures, and pathological aggression in human... | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Surg Neurol Int, Official publication of Surgical Neurology International
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The Memory Fades, The Emotion Remains

The Memory Fades, The Emotion Remains | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
People with Alzheimer’s disease can experience severe memory impairments.However, according to a new study, the emotions associated with events can persist long after the events themselves have been forgotten: Feelings Without Memory in Alzheimer...
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Preliminary evidence for reduced cortical activity in experienced guitarists during performance preparation for simple scale playing

 ABSTRACT: Research using neuroscientific techniques has shown that less cortical activity occurs in the brains of experienced musicians and athletes than in the brains of novices when they plan and prepare to perform a motor skill. We used electroencephalography to observe cortical activity in the brains of experienced and novice guitarists preparing to play a scale on the guitar. The results, presented in this research note, confirm the findings of previous research and suggest that the motor preparation of experts is more efficient than that of novices. Cortical activity in music students could therefore, if tracked longitudinally, provide an objective marker of musical skill learning and be used to inform music learning, teaching and assessment practices. 

KEY WORDS: Electroencephalography, movement-related cortical potential, motor skills, skill learning, guitar 


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from the plastic brain
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The Seat of Consciousness: At Least Two Brain Regions Decide What We Perceive - Temporal & Frontal Lobes

The Seat of Consciousness: At Least Two Brain Regions Decide What We Perceive - Temporal & Frontal Lobes | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex represent the content of consciousness. The red trace depicts neural activity (neuronal discharges) in the lateral prefrontal cortex when a stimulus is consciously perceived for 1 second while the green trace depicts neural activity when the same stimulus is suppressed from awareness. Credit Max Planck Institute.

 

People have never been exposed to as many sensory stimuli as they are today. We do not, however, consciously perceive the majority of the sensory impressions that bombard us. Our brain processes these impressions without us noticing. But where does the brain decide which sensory information should reach our consciousness and which should not? Tests on the brains of macaques have shown that neurons in at least two regions of the brain, the temporal and frontal lobes, are responsible for this. Coma patients are among the potential beneficiaries of this research breakthrough.

The cerebral cortex, i.e. the external part of the brain with its grooves and folds, plays a major role in our consciousness. When macaques see something and consciously perceive it, neurons in the temporal lobes of the cerebral cortex are active. This much was already known. However, is this part of the brain really the sole seat of consciousness, or do other areas of the brain also play a role in this process?


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Neurons see what we tell them to see

Neurons see what we tell them to see | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Neurons programmed to fire at specific faces—such as the famously reported "Jennifer Aniston neuron"—may be more in line with the conscious recognition of faces than the actual images seen.
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Device lets docs stay 'tuned in' to brain bloodflow

Device lets docs stay 'tuned in' to brain bloodflow | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
For Dr. John Murkin, the medical device business is all about "making a better mouse trap."
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Three Bay Area institutions join forces to seed transformative brain research - UC Berkeley

Three Bay Area institutions join forces to seed transformative brain research - UC Berkeley | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it


Two state-of-the-art research areas – nanotech and optogenetics – were the dominant theme last Thursday, Sept.

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