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Cortisol Reinforces Traumatic Memories

Cortisol Reinforces Traumatic Memories | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
According to a new study, cortisol strengthens traumatic memories, both when the memory is formed and when it is reconsolidated.

 

"It had been shown that the stress hormone cortisol has a strengthening impact on the consolidation of memories, i.e. the several-hour process in the course of which a memory is formed immediately after the experience. Image is for illustrative purposes only. Image credit: Ben Mills."


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Changing Memories to Treat PTSD

Changing Memories to Treat PTSD | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A controversial area of brain research suggests it may be possible—but is it ethical?

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Shedding new light on the formation of emotional fear memories | RIKEN

Shedding new light on the formation of emotional fear memories | RIKEN | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Everyday events are easy to forget, but unpleasant ones can remain engraved in the brain. A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences identifies a neural mechanism through which unpleasant experiences are translated into signals that trigger fear memories by changing neural connections in a part of the brain called the amygdala. The findings show that a long-standing theory on how the brain forms memories, called Hebbian plasticity, is partially correct, but not as simple as was originally proposed.

 

Summary from Learning & the Brain Society Newsletter - January 2015:

Shedding new light on the formation of emotional fear memories 

RIKEN Brain Science Institute

 

Everyday events are easy to forget, but unpleasant ones can remain engraved in the brain. A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences identifies a neural mechanism through which unpleasant experiences are translated into signals that trigger fear memories by changing neural connections in a part of the brain called the amygdala. The findings show that a long-standing theory on how the brain forms memories, called Hebbian plasticity, is partially correct, but not as simple as was originally proposed.


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For Combat Veterans with PTSD, Fear Circuitry in the Brain Never Rests

For Combat Veterans with PTSD, Fear Circuitry in the Brain Never Rests | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
New imaging study of combat veterans shows that brain regions linked to PTSD function abnormally even in the absence of external stress.

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Gina Stepp's curator insight, May 19, 2013 11:31 PM

Why do some soldiers develop PTSD while others don't? Our fear circuitry is regulated in the early stages of life . . . partly genetic, partly epigenetic factors--here's one piece of the puzzle . . .