Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Sorting Out Emotions | Caltech

Sorting Out Emotions | Caltech | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Building on previous studies targeting the amygdala, a team of researchers has found that some brain cells recognize emotions based on the viewer's preconceptions rather than the true emotion being expressed.

Via Sharrock, Sandeep Gautam
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Sharrock's curator insight, March 1, 2015 4:49 PM

"These are very exciting findings suggesting that the amygdala doesn't just respond to what we see out there in the world, but rather to what we imagine or believe about the world," says Ralph Adolphs, the Bren Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Caltech and coauthor of a paper that discusses the team's study.  "It's particularly interesting because the amygdala has been linked to so many psychiatric diseases, ranging from anxiety to depression to autism.  All of those diseases are about experiences happening in the minds of the patients, rather than objective facts about the world that everyone shares."


Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, March 2, 2015 12:49 AM

emotions are the products of our mind, as much as they are of objective reality out there!

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, March 4, 2015 3:29 AM

Another, deeper roots to our biases... on the brain-cell level... well, that might be a challenge...

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What 60 Years of Research Has Thought Us About Willpower

What 60 Years of Research Has Thought Us About Willpower | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
What are the secrets to willpower? Find out in "The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-Control" by pioneer psychologist Walter Mischel.

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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, October 10, 2014 1:24 PM

What you might not know about the Marshmallow Test is that its creator, legendary psychologist Walter Mischel, struggled with self-control his whole life...

Prof. Hankell's curator insight, October 10, 2014 1:27 PM

What you might not know about the Marshmallow Test is that its creator, legendary psychologist Walter Mischel, struggled with self-control his whole life...

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Eric Kandel: Unconscious Decision Making

http://bigthink.com/ Nobel Prize winning neuropsychiatrist Eric Kandel describes new research which hints at the possibility of a biological basis to the unc...

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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, M.Ed, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke, Gust MEES, Tom Perran
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WEAC's curator insight, August 7, 2015 9:55 AM

"Because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops."

Larry Heuser's curator insight, August 8, 2015 3:27 PM

Using the Internet is like jet skiing.  Skimming along the surface of the water at high speed, exposed to a broad vista, surrounded by many distractions, and only able to focus fleetingly on any one thing.

Audrey's curator insight, August 13, 2015 5:56 PM

This is true.  They seem to be absorbing ideas faster.

 

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Dementia breakthrough: Experts reveal two key ways to fight disease

Dementia breakthrough: Experts reveal two key ways to fight disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
KEEPING the brain active and eating a healthy diet are the best ways to protect against dementia in old age, say experts.

 

Two breakthrough new studies have revealed that being good with words and eating just a handful of walnuts every day can help stave off the ravages of the brain disease. The simple tips mean that millions of people could protect themselves from Alzheimer's in old age by introducing the easy changes to their daily lives.

 

Proving the old adage "use it or lose it", a new study has shown that being good with words could help stave off ageing conditions including dementia. Experts have discovered that having a rich and varied vocabulary, just like TV personalities Stephen Fry and Will Self, protects against brain decline. As people get older, their brain's intelligence is put under strain. But researchers from the University of Santiago de Compostela in Spain have studied what factors can help to improve this ability and they conclude that having a higher level of vocabulary is one such factor.

 

"Cognitive reserve" is the name given to the brain's capacity to compensate for the loss of its functions. Cristina Lojo Seoane, co-author of the study published in the journal Annals of Psychology, said: "We focused on level of vocabulary as it is considered an indicator of crystallised intelligence - the use of previously acquired intellectual skills. he said:

 

"This led us to the conclusion that a higher level of vocabulary, as a measure of cognitive reserve, can protect against cognitive impairment."

 

A second study, from experts at New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities (IBR), revealed that eating a diet packed with a handful of walnuts every day can have a major impact on keeping dementia at bay.  The new research, published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, found that potent ingredients in the popular nuts can have a beneficial effects in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, slowing the progression of, or preventing Alzheimer's.

 

Led by Dr Abha Chauhan, the study found significant improvement in learning skills, memory, reducing anxiety, and motor development in mice fed a walnut-enriched diet. The researchers believe that it is the high antioxidant content of walnuts which may protect the brain from the degeneration typically seen in Alzheimer's.

 

Read more here: http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/526195/New-dementia-breakthrough-experts-two-ways-fight-disease

 

The associated research articles can be read here: 

http://iospress.metapress.com/content/n644184610325684/

[Spanish] http://revistas.um.es/analesps/article/view/analesps.30.3.158481


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Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, October 29, 2014 11:07 AM

Exercise http://sco.lt/789qRV and Green Tea http://sco.lt/8niYE5 have also been shown to be effective in preventing dementia

 

Elderly suffering from dementia may not remember events but they do remember feelings http://sco.lt/7jzwWX

 

More scoops about Alzheimer's can be read here: 

http://www.scoop.it/t/biotech-and-beyond/?tag=Alzheimer%E2%80%99s

 

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The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow...

The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow... | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The Neurobiology of “We”. Relationship is the flow of energy and information between people, essential in our development
“The study of neuroplasticity is changing the way scientists think about the...

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Tiago's curator insight, February 26, 2013 2:28 AM
"...we can learn to be open in an authentic way to others, and to ourselves. The outcome of such an integrative presence is not only a sense of deep well-being and compassion for ourselves and others, but also an opening of the doors of awareness to a sense of the interdependence of everything. ‘We’ are indeed a part of an interconnected whole.” ~Dr. Daniel Siegel
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Professor John Cacioppo - Connected Minds: Loneliness, Social Brains and the Need for Community

Connected Minds: Loneliness, Social Brains and the Need for Community Professor John Cacioppo, author of the bestselling book Loneliness and co-founder of th...

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Jonathan Haidt Decodes the Tribal Psychology of Politics

Jonathan Haidt Decodes the Tribal Psychology of Politics | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

In March, Haidt will publish The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion (Pantheon). By laying out the science of morality—how it binds people into "groupish righteousness" and blinds them to their own biases—he hopes to drain some vitriol from public debate and enable conversations across ideological divides.


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Hugo Gonzalez's comment, May 5, 2014 9:30 PM
The legalizing of gay marriage is a big issue that is still giving many issues to many of the states of the US. Some of the states have easily agreed to allow gay marriage while others are refusing to let that happen because it goes against everything they believe or have been taught. Mixing religion with politics is not a good thing because it leads to lawsuits that no one has the time or the money to spend on.