Social Neuroscience Advances
5.8K views | +0 today
Follow
Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

How to Be a Better Listener

How to Be a Better Listener | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Couples often come in and say, “We need help with our communication,” and the presumption is that they need to become better communicators–by which they mean better talkers. But the best thing you can do for your relationship is become a better listener.


Here are some tips for improving your listening with everyone in your life–your partner, friends, colleagues, kids. They’ll all benefit, and so will you.1)  Notice when you’re just waiting to talk.


Learn more:


- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Listen+to+Me+with+Your+Eyes



Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Roger Francis, Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, June 2, 2015 1:28 AM

Couples often come in and say, “We need help with our communication,” and the presumption is that they need to become better communicators–by which they mean better talkers. But the best thing you can do for your relationship is become a better listener.


Here are some tips for improving your listening with everyone in your life–your partner, friends, colleagues, kids. They’ll all benefit, and so will you.1)  Notice when you’re just waiting to talk.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Listen+to+Me+with+Your+Eyes


Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Psychology, Sociology & Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

David DeSteno: Compassion science

David DeSteno directs the Social Emotions Lab at Northeastern University where his research is pulling back the curtain to reveal some of the mechanics that ...

Via Tiago
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Compassion & Mindfulness Research
Scoop.it!

Brief Mindfulness Meditation Improves Mental State Attribution and Empathizing

Brief Mindfulness Meditation Improves Mental State Attribution and Empathizing | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

(Free full text available)The ability to infer and understand the mental states of others (i.e., Theory of Mind) is a cornerstone of human interaction. While considerable efforts have focused on explicating when, why and for whom this fundamental psychological ability can go awry, considerably less is known about factors that may enhance theory of mind. Accordingly, the current study explored the possibility that mindfulness-based meditation may improve people’s mindreading skills. Following a 5-minute mindfulness induction, participants with no prior meditation experience completed tests that assessed mindreading and empathic understanding. The results revealed that brief mindfulness meditation enhanced both mental state attribution and empathic concern, compared to participants in the control group. These findings suggest that mindfulness may be a powerful technique for facilitating core aspects of social-cognitive functioning.


Via Dr James Hawkins
more...
Dr James Hawkins's curator insight, February 24, 2015 1:29 AM

Great stuff ... short "breathing space" mindfulness exercises can be useful in so many ways ... including between clients as a psychotherapist, at the start of groups, and so on.

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

This Is Your Brain On The Internet

This Is Your Brain On The Internet | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Is the internet and social media influencing your brain? Documentary filmmaker Tiffany Shlain investigates our changing behaviors in the connected world.

How do media and technology impact our brain? According to a "a recent study, Dr. Small observed brain activity in two groups of subjects interacting with a search engine –one that was 'net-savvy' and one that was 'net naïve'. The results showed increased brain activity in the experienced netizens, reflecting Shlain’s hypothesis that our online behaviors stimulate more brain systems."

For more information and to view a video on "our connected world" click through to the article.


Via Beth Dichter, Tom Perran
more...
Eric Moss's curator insight, June 29, 2015 10:11 AM

When you hear the word "addicted", normally the first thing that comes to mind is drugs, alcohol, and cigarettes, what about the internet? I found it extremely interesting that there is actually a classified disorder in today’s age, Internet Addiction Disorder. What if you go out to dinner, and you are sitting at the table for just to long, have you ever gotten a craving to just go check social media? It appears to me that social media is chemically changing our brains around. An interesting route to go might be quitting the Internet “cold turkey”, if it works for other addictions, why not try it for this. Seeing how the dopamine, and other chemicals are really reacting inside our brain could be beneficial to determining a solution to this up and coming problem. It seems as if our changing society has lead to such problems, maybe these are some of the repercussions we must face with our advancing technological state.