Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
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Transparent optogenetic brain implants: Yet another amazing use for graphene

Transparent optogenetic brain implants: Yet another amazing use for graphene | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
The most powerful brain implants being built today can record fast electric signals using conductive arrays while permitting light to pass out through them for high-resolution imaging . To take it up a notch, they also can let light in for optogenetic control directly under the implant. Two new studies just published in Nature Communications have the details.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Graphene



Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 26, 2014 7:05 PM
The most powerful brain implants being built today can record fast electric signals using conductive arrays while permitting light to pass out through them for high-resolution imaging . To take it up a notch, they also can let light in for optogenetic control directly under the implant. Two new studies just published in Nature Communications have the details.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Graphene


Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
Scoop.it!

Scientists May Have Found A Way To Bring Back Memories Of Dementia Patients

Scientists May Have Found A Way To Bring Back Memories Of Dementia Patients | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
"Since our work shows we can reverse the processes that weaken synapses, we could potentially counteract some of the beta amyloid's effects of Alzheimer's."




The scientists found they could then re-activate the lost memory by re-stimulating the same nerves with a memory-forming, high-frequency train of optical pulses.


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 1, 2014 5:24 PM

The scientists found they could then re-activate the lost memory by re-stimulating the same nerves with a memory-forming, high-frequency train of optical pulses.