Social Neuroscience Advances
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Neuroscience_topics
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GABA actions and ionic plasticity in epilepsy

GABA actions and ionic plasticity in epilepsy | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

[Review] Highlights:- Ionic plasticity of GABA signaling relies on short-term and long term changes in EGABA-  Cl− transport and carboanhydrases play a key role in ionic plasticity and epilepsy.

- GABAergic transmission has both seizure-suppressing and seizure-promoting effects.

- TrkB and calpain act on GABA signaling to coordinate the process of epileptogenesis.

- GABA signaling has context-specific and age-specific effects in health and disease.

- by Kaila Kai et al., Current Opinion in Neurobiology, Volume 26, June 2014, Pages 34–41


Via Julien Hering, PhD
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Neuroscience_topics
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Inhibitory Plasticity Dictates the Sign of Plasticity at Excitatory Synapses

The broad connectivity of inhibitory interneurons and the capacity of inhibitory synapses to be plastic make them ideal regulators of the level of excitability of many neurons simultaneously. Whether inhibitory synaptic plasticity may also contribute to the selective regulation of single neurons and local microcircuits activity has not been investigated. Here we demonstrate that in rat primary visual cortex inhibitory synaptic plasticity is connection specific and depends on the activation of postsynaptic GABAB–Gi/o protein signaling. Through the activation of this intracellular signaling pathway, inhibitory plasticity can alter the state of a single postsynaptic neuron and directly affect the induction of plasticity at its glutamatergic inputs. This interaction is modulated by sensory experience. Our data demonstrate that in recurrent circuits, excitatory and inhibitory forms of synaptic plasticity are not integrated as independent events, but interact to cooperatively drive the activity-dependent rewiring of local microcircuits. (...) - by Wang L and Maffei A, The Journal of Neuroscience, 22 January 2014, 34(4): 1083-1093


Via Julien Hering, PhD
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