Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Debunking Brain Myths
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A Neuroscientist Argues That Everybody Is Misunderstanding Fear and Anxiety

A Neuroscientist Argues That Everybody Is Misunderstanding Fear and Anxiety | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
And he thinks it may be his fault.

Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, July 23, 2015 8:05 PM

An interesting summary of Joseph LeDoux's latest book wondering if we have misunderstood the roots of fear and anxiety.

As the author says, "... fear and anxiety are not wired into the brain as basic responses to the world around us — rather, the responses that lead to them are, and they only coalesce into fear when the brain interprets them as such."

Jennifer Lynn's curator insight, January 11, 6:38 AM

Though fear and anxiety are two different feelings, there is hardly any difference between the response of two. The feelings of fear and anxiety both depend upon the fundamental experiences of life. If you want to know how to deal with fear or anxiety, you need to know the difference between the two. Click on the following links to know, what is fear and anxiety: http://bit.ly/1OK96Lr http://bit.ly/1SJfRPy ;

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Neuroscience_topics
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Functional anatomy of neural circuits regulating fear and extinction

Functional anatomy of neural circuits regulating fear and extinction | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

The memory of fear extinction is context dependent: fear that is suppressed in one context readily renews in another. Understanding of the underlying neuronal circuits is, therefore, of considerable clinical relevance for anxiety disorders. Prefrontal cortical and hippocampal inputs to the amygdala have recently been shown to regulate the retrieval of fear memories, but the cellular organization of these projections remains unclear. By using anterograde tracing in a transgenic rat in which neurons express a dendritically-targeted PSD-95:Venus fusion protein under the control of a c-fos promoter, we found that, during the retrieval of extinction memory, the dominant input to active neurons in the lateral amygdala was from the infralimbic cortex, whereas the retrieval of fear memory was associated with greater hippocampal and prelimbic inputs. This pattern of retrieval-related afferent input was absent in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Our data show functional anatomy of neural circuits regulating fear and extinction, providing a framework for therapeutic manipulations of these circuits. (...) - by Knapska E et al.PNAS October 16, 2012 vol. 109 no. 42 17093-17098


Via Julien Hering, PhD
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Jim Siders's curator insight, February 11, 2013 1:45 PM

wonder what this does with learning opportunities

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Neuroscience_topics
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Learning and reconsolidation implicate different synaptic mechanisms

Learning and reconsolidation implicate different synaptic mechanisms | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Synaptic mechanisms underlying memory reconsolidation after retrieval are largely unknown. Here we report that synapses in projections to the lateral nucleus of the amygdala implicated in auditory fear conditioning, which are potentiated by learning, enter a labile state after memory reactivation, and must be restabilized through a postsynaptic mechanism implicating the mammalian target of rapamycin kinase-dependent signaling. Fear-conditioning–induced synaptic enhancements were primarily presynaptic in origin. Reconsolidation blockade with rapamycin, inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin kinase activity, suppressed synaptic potentiation in slices from fear-conditioned rats. Surprisingly, this reduction of synaptic efficacy was mediated by post- but not presynaptic mechanisms. These findings suggest that different plasticity rules may apply to the processes underlying the acquisition of original fear memory and postreactivational stabilization of fear-conditioning–induced synaptic enhancements mediating fear memory reconsolidation. - by Li Y. et al., PNASvol. 110 no. 12, 47984803



Via Julien Hering, PhD
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