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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Scientists May Have Found A Way To Bring Back Memories Of Dementia Patients

Scientists May Have Found A Way To Bring Back Memories Of Dementia Patients | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
"Since our work shows we can reverse the processes that weaken synapses, we could potentially counteract some of the beta amyloid's effects of Alzheimer's."




The scientists found they could then re-activate the lost memory by re-stimulating the same nerves with a memory-forming, high-frequency train of optical pulses.


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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 1, 2:24 PM

The scientists found they could then re-activate the lost memory by re-stimulating the same nerves with a memory-forming, high-frequency train of optical pulses.


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The aging brain is more malleable than previously believed

The aging brain is more malleable than previously believed | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists are finding that, as we get older, our aging brains are proving surprisingly malleable, and in ways not previously anticipated. But there are limitations.

 

 

 

Read more:

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-08-aging-brain-malleable-previously-believed.html

 


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Creative right brain myth debunked | KurzweilAI

Creative right brain myth debunked | KurzweilAI | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Yet another brain myth bites the dust, joining we only use 10 percent of our brain, and other pseudoscience nonsense that tries to cram people in nice neat boxes. 

 

The left hemisphere of your brain, thought to be the logic and math portion, actually plays a critical role in creative thinking, University of Southern California (USC) researchers have found, at least for visual creative tasks (and musical, as previously found)...


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Brain-Controlled Computer Tracks Attention : Discovery News

Brain-Controlled Computer Tracks Attention : Discovery News | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A brainwave monitor helps train people to pay attention and boosts performance.

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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke, Gust MEES, Tom Perran
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Linda Buckmaster's comment, December 17, 2012 2:44 PM
Thanks for the rescoop.
Jim Siders's curator insight, March 20, 2013 9:06 AM

to tech or not to tech........that is the question. Not just a casual question if this report is accurate.

sarah's curator insight, May 30, 2013 11:04 PM

Très intéressant.

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Bullying doesn't just hurt your feelings - it can make you ill, say researchers

Bullying doesn't just hurt your feelings - it can make you ill, say researchers | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Jenny Tung from Duke University in North Carolina studied rhesus macaques and found that social stress resulted in their immune systems suffering.

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Web addicts 'have brain changes'

Web addicts 'have brain changes' | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Brain scans show changes in the brain of internet addicts similar to those found in drug and alcohol addicts, preliminary research suggests.

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