Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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How to Be a Better Listener

How to Be a Better Listener | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Couples often come in and say, “We need help with our communication,” and the presumption is that they need to become better communicators–by which they mean better talkers. But the best thing you can do for your relationship is become a better listener.


Here are some tips for improving your listening with everyone in your life–your partner, friends, colleagues, kids. They’ll all benefit, and so will you.1)  Notice when you’re just waiting to talk.


Learn more:


- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Listen+to+Me+with+Your+Eyes



Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Roger Francis, Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 2, 2015 1:28 AM

Couples often come in and say, “We need help with our communication,” and the presumption is that they need to become better communicators–by which they mean better talkers. But the best thing you can do for your relationship is become a better listener.


Here are some tips for improving your listening with everyone in your life–your partner, friends, colleagues, kids. They’ll all benefit, and so will you.1)  Notice when you’re just waiting to talk.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Listen+to+Me+with+Your+Eyes


Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
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Creative right brain myth debunked | KurzweilAI

Creative right brain myth debunked | KurzweilAI | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Yet another brain myth bites the dust, joining we only use 10 percent of our brain, and other pseudoscience nonsense that tries to cram people in nice neat boxes. 

 

The left hemisphere of your brain, thought to be the logic and math portion, actually plays a critical role in creative thinking, University of Southern California (USC) researchers have found, at least for visual creative tasks (and musical, as previously found)...


Via Gust MEES
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, M.Ed, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke, Gust MEES, Tom Perran
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WEAC's curator insight, August 7, 2015 9:55 AM

"Because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops."

Larry Heuser's curator insight, August 8, 2015 3:27 PM

Using the Internet is like jet skiing.  Skimming along the surface of the water at high speed, exposed to a broad vista, surrounded by many distractions, and only able to focus fleetingly on any one thing.

Audrey's curator insight, August 13, 2015 5:56 PM

This is true.  They seem to be absorbing ideas faster.