Social Neuroscience Advances
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Social Neuroscience Advances
Understanding ourselves and how we interact
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Compassion & Mindfulness Research
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Memory Specificity and Mindfulness Jointly Moderate the Effect of Reflective Pondering on Depressive Symptoms in Individuals With a History of Recurrent Depression

Memory Specificity and Mindfulness Jointly Moderate the Effect of Reflective Pondering on Depressive Symptoms in Individuals With a History of Recurrent Depression | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

(Available in free full text) In previously depressed individuals, reflective thinking may easily get derailed and lead to detrimental effects. This study investigated the conditions in which such thinking is, or is not, adaptive. Levels of mindfulness and autobiographical memory specificity were assessed as potential moderators of the relationship between reflective thinking and depressive symptoms. Two hundred seventy-four individuals with a history of three or more previous episodes of depression completed self-report measures of depressive symptoms, rumination—including subscales for reflection and brooding—and mindfulness, as well as an autobiographical memory task to assess memory specificity. In those low in both mindfulness and memory specificity, higher levels of reflection were related to more depressive symptoms, whereas in all other groups higher levels of reflection were related to fewer depressive symptoms. The results demonstrate that the relation between reflective pondering and depressive symptoms varies depending on individual state or trait factors. In previously depressed individuals, the cognitive problem-solving aspect of reflection may be easily hampered when tendencies toward unspecific processing are increased, and awareness of mental processes such as self-judgment and reactivity is decreased.


Via Dr James Hawkins
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Dr James Hawkins's curator insight, July 4, 2015 7:06 PM

Very interesting ...

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Neuroscience_topics
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[Review] Epigenetic Mechanisms of Depression and Antidepressant Action

[Review] Epigenetic Mechanisms of Depression and Antidepressant Action | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

[Abstract] Epigenetic mechanisms, which control chromatin structure and function, mediate changes in gene expression that occur in response to diverse stimuli. Recent research has established that environmental events and behavioral experience induce epigenetic changes at particular gene loci and that these changes help shape neuronal plasticity and function and hence behavior. Some of these changes can be stable and can even persist for a lifetime. Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that aberrations in chromatin remodeling and subsequent effects on gene expression within limbic brain regions contribute to the pathogenesis of depression and other stress-related disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and other anxiety syndromes. Likewise, the gradually developing but persistent therapeutic effects of antidepressant medications may be achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the epigenetic regulation of stress-related disorders and focuses on three distinct aspects of stress-induced epigenetic pathology: the effects of stress and antidepressant treatment during adulthood, the lifelong effects of early-life stress on subsequent stress vulnerability, and the possible transgenerational transmission of stress-induced abnormalities. - by Vialou V et al., Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 53(1):59


Via Julien Hering, PhD
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from The Psychogenyx News Feed
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A new milestone in non-pharmaceutical treatments for depression | Nick Davis

A new milestone in non-pharmaceutical treatments for depression | Nick Davis | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Nick Davis: Last week’s announcement that a UK company won US approval for device-based treatment of depression is excellent news for taking academic findings into a clinical setting

Via Luis Valdes
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