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Alzheimer’s Diagnostic Tests Inch Forward, but Treatments Are Still Lacking

Alzheimer’s Diagnostic Tests Inch Forward, but Treatments Are Still Lacking | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Researchers are trying to develop ways to more quickly and accurately diagnose Alzheimer’s, which might lead to better treatments and understanding in the future

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Bilingualism delays Alzheimer's manifestation by more than four years

Bilingualism delays Alzheimer's manifestation by more than four years | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

"A new study at Ghent University has established that the symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD) manifest themselves about four to five years later in bilinguals as opposed to monolinguals. In bilinguals, the disease onset was estimated at the age of 77, while in monolinguals, this was at the age of 73.

"Between March 2013 and May 2014, 69 monolingual and 65 bilingual Belgian patients suffering from probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) participated in the study. Psychologists Evy Woumans, Michaël Stevens, and Wouter Duyck, together with neurologists Patrick Santens, Anne Sieben, and Jan Versijpt determined the age of AD manifestation and AD diagnosis for both language groups."

 

Summary from Learning & the Brain Society Newsletter - January 2015

Bilingualism delays Alzheimer's manifestation by more than four years 

Science Daily

 

A new study at Ghent University has established that the symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD) manifest themselves about four to five years later in bilinguals as opposed to monolinguals. In bilinguals, the disease onset was estimated at the age of 77, while in monolinguals, this was at the age of 73. Results showed that the age of AD manifestation was 71.5 in monolinguals and 76.1 in bilinguals. A similar difference was found for the age of AD diagnosis; for monolinguals this was 72.5 and for bilinguals it was 77.3. Analyses controlled for other confounding factors, such as education, profession & socioeconomic status, which actually had a negative effect.


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Long term use of benzodiazepine for anxiety & sleep disorders can increase risk of Alzheimer’s disease

Long term use of benzodiazepine for anxiety & sleep disorders can increase risk of Alzheimer’s disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

This case-control study based on 8980 individuals representative of elderly people living in the community in Quebec showed that the risk of Alzheimer’s disease was increased by 43-51% among those who had used benzodiazepines in the past. Risk increased with density of exposure and when long acting benzodiazepines were used. Further adjustment on symptoms thought to be potential prodromes for dementia—such as depression, anxiety, or sleep disorders—did not meaningfully alter the results.


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Analysis of African Plant Reveals Possible Treatment for Aging Brain

Analysis of African Plant Reveals Possible Treatment for Aging Brain | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Salk scientists find that a plant used for centuries by healers of São Tomé e Príncipe holds lessons for modern medicine.

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Antidepressant Holds Promise in Treating Alzheimer's Agitation - 02/18/2014

The antidepressant drug citalopram, sold under the brand names Celexa and Cipramil and also available as a generic medication, significantly relieved agitation in a group of patients with Alzheimer's disease. In lower doses than those tested, the drug might be safer than antipsychotic drugs currently used to treat the condition, according to results of a clinical trial led by Johns Hopkins researchers that included seven other academic medical centers in the United States and Canada.

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Study: Harnessing a virtual reality brain training game to diagnose mild cognitive impairment (MCI) | SharpBrains

Study: Harnessing a virtual reality brain training game to diagnose mild cognitive impairment (MCI) | SharpBrains | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Vir­tual real­ity brain train­ing game can detect mild cog­ni­tive impair­ment, a con­di­tion that often pre­dates Alzheimer’s dis­ease (press release):

“Geek researchers demon­strated the poten­tial of a vir­tual super­mar­ket cog­ni­tive train­ing game as a screen­ing tool for patients with mild cog­ni­tive impair­ment (MCI) among a sam­ple of older adults…

In an arti­cle pub­lished in the Jour­nal of Alzheimer’s Dis­ease, the researchers have indi­cated that the vir­tual super­mar­ket (VSM) appli­ca­tion displayed…a level of diag­nos­tic accu­racy sim­i­lar to stan­dard­ized neu­ropsy­cho­log­i­cal tests, which are the gold stan­dard for MCI screen­ing. Patients with MCI can live inde­pen­dently and not all such patients progress to AD. There­fore the global effort against cog­ni­tive dis­or­ders is focused on early detec­tion at the MCI stage…

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Why People with Down Syndrome Invariably Develop Alzheimer's Disease

Why People with Down Syndrome Invariably Develop Alzheimer's Disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it

Amyloid plaques are found in the brains of people with Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease. Credit Juan Gartner.

 

Study reveals how the SNX27 protein regulates the generation of beta amyloid.

 

A new study by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute reveals the process that leads to changes in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome—the same changes that cause dementia in Alzheimer’s patients. The findings, published in Cell Reports, have important implications for the development of treatments that can prevent damage in neuronal connectivity and brain function in Down syndrome and other neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Down syndrome is characterized by an extra copy of chromosome 21 and is the most common chromosome abnormality in humans. It occurs in about one per 700 babies in the United States, and is associated with a mild to moderate intellectual disability. Down syndrome is also associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. By the age of 40, nearly 100 percent of all individuals with Down syndrome develop the changes in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and approximately 25 percent of people with Down syndrome show signs of Alzheimer’s-type dementia by the age of 35, and 75 percent by age 65. As the life expectancy for people with Down syndrome has increased dramatically in recent years—from 25 in 1983 to 60 today—research aimed to understand the cause of conditions that affect their quality of life are essential.


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Magnetic brain stimulation treatment shown to boost memory

Magnetic brain stimulation treatment shown to boost memory | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
Non-invasive transcranial technique leads to 24-hour-long improvement in memory function and could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer's and other conditions

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Antidepressant May Slow Alzheimer’s Disease

Antidepressant May Slow Alzheimer’s Disease | Social Neuroscience Advances | Scoop.it
A commonly prescribed antidepressant can reduce production of the main ingredient in Alzheimer’s brain plaques, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Pennsylvania.

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