Social Network Analysis - Critique
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Starting Analysis and Visualisation of Spatial Data with R

Starting Analysis and Visualisation of Spatial Data with R | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it

Via M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
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Steven McDermott's comment, April 16, 2013 10:57 AM
I have spent an entire day learning to use R - surprisingly easy and enjoyable.
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Social Network Analysis of Science #Crowdfunding | #SNA

Social Network Analysis of Science #Crowdfunding | #SNA | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
CrowdFundingPlanning is a Complete Solution for a Fast and Successful CrowdFunding campaign empowering SMBs, Start-ups, Entrepreneurs, CF Expert Professionals and Investors Community.

Power of the Crowd, Expert and Cloud Sourcing.

Via luiy, Edouard Siekierski
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luiy's curator insight, January 21, 2014 9:40 AM

Readers will remember when I announced Ethan Perlstein‘s plan to crowdfund his scientific research. Well, since then, Ethan has been combining two of my interests: alternative ways of funding science and network science. In his attempt to achieve his goal of raising $25,000, Ethan has been attempting to understand what conditions and connections yield the most money. And network analysis is one component of this.


Some of his analyses have looked at the statistical properties of the donations so far, confirming that donations do not come in at a constant rate (there is often a burst in the beginning and end, with some stagnation in the middle). In addition, Ethan recently emailed me an analysis based on his Facebook friends, and who donated and who did not:

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#Challenge : Visualizing the Impact of the World Wide Web I #dataviz

#Challenge : Visualizing the Impact of the World Wide Web I #dataviz | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
Visualizing the Impact of the World Wide Web

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luiy's curator insight, November 23, 2013 2:00 PM
The World Wide Web is used every day by billions of people across the globe. The more we understand about this powerful, the more countries can leverage it to provide citizens with opportunities to make decisions about their needs and developmental possibilities. The World Wide Web Foundation, founded by Tim Berners-Lee, produces the Web Index, the world’s first multi-dimensional measure of the Web’s growth, utility and impact on people and nations. 


Dataset

Challenge Web Index 2013 

We've provided the data in XLS files and have compiled a data set for you to use in the challenge. For the full data set and additional Web Index resources, click here.

 

We encourage you to use other open data sets. 



Prizes

First Prize: $3,200 and one (1) invitation to attend a Web Foundation event in 2014 to celebrate the Web's 25th anniversary. 

Honorable Mention: $500

Student Prize: $300  

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The Dark Corners of the Internet | #SNA #dataviz

The Dark Corners of the Internet | #SNA #dataviz | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
The way information spreads through society has been the focus of intense study in recent years. This work has thrown up…

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luiy's curator insight, October 28, 2013 5:15 AM

The way information spreads through society has been the focus of intense study in recent years. This work has thrown up some dramatic results; it explains why some ideas become viral while others do not, why certain individuals are more influential than others and how best to exploit the properties of a network to spread information most effectively.

 

But today, Chuang Liu at Hangzhou Normal University in China and a few pals have a surprise. They say that when information spreads, there are always blind spots in a network that never receive it. And these unreachable dark corners of the network can be numerous and sizeable.

 

Until now theorists have predicted that information can always spread until it saturates a network to the point where everybody has received it. These predictions are come from models based on our understanding of diseases and the way they percolate through a population. The basic assumption is that information spreads in the same way.

Marco Valli's curator insight, January 11, 2014 6:36 AM

A different view on information spread and diffusion on a network. A simple model, accounting for the key difference between "viruses" and "information", both from the sender and the receiver point of view.

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Pew Research Center Survey glances at Gender, Age & Race of Social Media users

Pew Research Center Survey glances at Gender, Age & Race of Social Media users | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
Pew Research Center is known as a famous survey centre worldwide. Currently Pew Research Center has conducted a survey on the age, race and gender (Latest Technlogy News:...
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Anthropology Matters, Public Relations, Promotion, Value | Anthropology Report

Anthropology Matters, Public Relations, Promotion, Value | Anthropology Report | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
Featured book is Anthropology Matters as the anthropology blogs churn around issues of public relations (PR), branding, promotion and value of anthropology.
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The future of propaganda: A Q&A with Sean Gourley about big data and the "war of ideas"

The future of propaganda: A Q&A with Sean Gourley about big data and the "war of ideas" | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
During the Iraq war, the U.S. military used open-source data, from news reports to Facebook photos, to help detect patterns in the violence. But that’s just the beginning.

Via M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
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GeoFlow: An Eye-Popping Excel Feature to Showcase Big Data

GeoFlow: An Eye-Popping Excel Feature to Showcase Big Data | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
GeoFlow helps you automatically map clicks, conversions, revenue and more within minutes; create amazing visualizations like heatmaps and 3D column charts; and has play button functionality to show trends over time.
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Noam Chomsky vs Michel Foucault (FULL DEBATE)

Noam Chomsky and Michel Foucault debate "Justice vs. Power" in 1971
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Time to rise to the challenge of social impact measurement

Time to rise to the challenge of social impact measurement | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
Just because measuring social impact is hard to do, this doesn't mean we should give up, says Jeremy Nicholls (Time to rise to the challenge of social impact measurement http://t.co/td7Ut4yX5a via...
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How Vine is Changing the Face of Online Journalism | Social Media Today

How Vine is Changing the Face of Online Journalism | Social Media Today | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
Although Vine was only released in January, it’s already made an impact in the world of citizen journalism, and it’s easy to see why – its ease of use, length constraints and accessibility make it the perfect platform for people to capture their own news, ready to share it with their friends and family on social media. In fact, Vine users have already made a start – in February, a Turkish journalist used the app to document the aftermath of a suicide bombing outside the U.S. embassy, barely a week after the app was launched. More recently, Vine user Doug Lorman shared a clip of the explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Timeliness played a part – the video was shared thirty minutes after the explosion, and was quickly disseminated online with over 100 RTs on Twitter alone....
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Quantum Network Secretly Running for 2 Years - LiveScience.com

Quantum Network Secretly Running for 2 Years - LiveScience.com | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
Quantum Network Secretly Running for 2 Years LiveScience.com A national laboratory has been running a quantum network that could make perfectly secure Internet communications a reality.
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Exclusive: How Google's Algorithm Rules the Web | Wired Magazine | Wired.com

Exclusive: How Google's Algorithm Rules the Web | Wired Magazine | Wired.com | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
Want to know how Google is about to change your life? Stop by the Ouagadougou conference room on a Thursday morning. It is here, at the Mountain View, Cali

Via Pierre Levy
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Catherine Pascal's curator insight, January 30, 2014 6:33 AM

 Clair !!

luiy's curator insight, January 30, 2014 8:50 AM

Google is famously creative at encouraging these breakthroughs; every year, it holds an internal demo fair called CSI — Crazy Search Ideas — in an attempt to spark offbeat but productive approaches. But for the most part, the improvement process is a relentless slog, grinding through bad results to determine what isn’t working. One unsuccessful search became a legend: Sometime in 2001, Singhal learned of poor results when people typed the name “audrey fino” into the search box. Google kept returning Italian sites praising Audrey Hepburn. (Fino means fine in Italian.) “We realized that this is actually a person’s name,” Singhal says. “But we didn’t have the smarts in the system.”

 

The Audrey Fino failure led Singhal on a multiyear quest to improve the way the system deals with names — which account for 8 percent of all searches. To crack it, he had to master the black art of “bi-gram breakage” — that is, separating multiple words into discrete units. For instance, “new york” represents two words that go together (a bi-gram). But so would the three words in “new york times,” which clearly indicate a different kind of search. And everything changes when the query is “new york times square.” Humans can make these distinctions instantly, but Google does not have a Brazil-like back room with hundreds of thousands of cubicle jockeys. It relies on algorithms.

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, January 31, 2014 12:08 AM

"The comparison demonstrates the power, even intelligence, of Google’s algorithm, honed over countless iterations. It possesses the seemingly magical ability to interpret searchers’ requests — no matter how awkward or misspelled. Google refers to that ability as search quality, and for years the company has closely guarded the process by which it delivers such accurate results. But now I am sitting with Singhal in the search giant’s Building 43, where the core search team works, because Google has offered to give me an unprecedented look at just how it attains search quality. The subtext is clear: You may think the algorithm is little more than an engine, but wait until you get under the hood and see what this baby can really do."

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High-Resolution Maps of Science | #dataviz #scientometrics

High-Resolution Maps of Science | #dataviz #scientometrics | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it

'Maps of science derived from citation data visualize the relationships among scholarly publications or disciplines. They are valuable instruments for exploring the structure and evolution of scholarly activity. Much like early world charts, these maps of science provide an overall visual perspective of science as well as a reference system that stimulates further exploration. However, these maps are also significantly biased due to the nature of the citation data from which they are derived: existing citation databases overrepresent the natural sciences; substantial delays typical of journal publication yield insights in science past, not present; and connections between scientific disciplines are tracked in a manner that ignores informal cross-fertilization..'


Via Nicholas Goubert, Lauren Moss, Rui Guimarães Lima, luiy, Edouard Siekierski
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The Potential of Social Network Analysis in Intelligence

The Potential of Social Network Analysis in Intelligence | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
Within its limits, SNA can be applied to identify individuals or organizations within a network, generate new leads and simulate flows of information or money throughout a network.

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ukituki's curator insight, January 10, 2014 4:33 AM

Like every analytic technique, SNA has great utility for the right question. Within its limits, SNA is unmatched and can be usefully applied to identify key individuals or organizations within a network, generate new leads and simulate the flows of information or money throughout a network.  SNA, however, remains just an answer, not the answer.  Used inappropriately or without a full understanding of the limits of the method and analysts will only be finding new and more technically sophisticated ways to fail.  That, then, is the primary job of the modern day analyst: making the judgment call of which techniques to use and when.  Equally as important as knowing when to use SNA is knowing when not to use it.

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Thoughts on “Collective Intelligence”

Thoughts on “Collective Intelligence” | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it

"This is a summary and analysis of Pierre Lévy‘s book “Collective Intelligence: mankind’s emerging world in cyberspace”, which provides all direct and indirect quotes in this essay..."


Via Pierre Levy, Andrea Naranjo, Didier Chauvin, Terheck
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Digital Methods Initiative

Digital Methods Initiative | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
The Digital Methods Initiative (DMI) is a collaboration between Mediastudies at the University of Amsterdam, Mediastudies and GovCom , an organization to develop political tools for the web.
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How Twitter is changing modern policing: the case of the Woolwich aftermath

How Twitter is changing modern policing: the case of the Woolwich aftermath | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
Twitter has transformed people’s response to crimes and how they engage with authorities like the police. Never was the changing nature of communication clearer than after the vicious attack on Drummer Lee Rigby in Woolwich.

Via Richard Evans
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Network Science

Network Science | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it

NEW JOURNAL IN 2013Network Science is a new journal for a new discipline - one using the network paradigm, focusing on actors and relational linkages, to inform research, methodology, and applications from many fields across the natural, social,...


Via A. J. Alvarez-Socorro, ukituki
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Big Data No Longer Lost in Translation - EMC Big Data

Big Data No Longer Lost in Translation - EMC Big Data | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
Tableau has partnered with Pivotal to add a social element to Self Service BI, whereby business users, data scientists, and IT collaborate around Big Data (RT @blisete: Great #bigdata interview with product manager of @tableau Ted Wasserman.
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In Media, Big Data Is Booming but Big Results Are Lacking

In Media, Big Data Is Booming but Big Results Are Lacking | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
Nobody wants to use the data. (In Media, Big Data Is Booming but Big Results Are Lacking http://t.co/r2xzuiAi2K)
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Big Data Knows What Your Future Holds

Forget Big Brother. Companies and countries are discovering that algorithms programmed to scour vast quantities of data can be much more powerful. They can predict your next purchase, forecast car thefts and maybe even help cure cancer.
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Back to the future: What if the 'mass media' era was just an accident of history? | Mathew Ingram

Back to the future: What if the 'mass media' era was just an accident of history? | Mathew Ingram | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
When it comes to the traditional media business, there is often a pervasive nostalgia for “the good old days,” when a handful of newspapers and TV networks ruled over the media landscape and profitability was so taken for granted that huge family dynasties with names like Sulzberger and Bancroft were built on that foundation. Many media executives no doubt dream about magically returning to such a time. But what if those days were just an illusion — a kind of accident of history? What would that mean for the future of media? This idea has come up before, but I was reminded of it when I read a Nieman Journalism Lab post about some research being done by Lee Humphreys, looking at the way that communication — and particularly personal communication, through letters and diaries and other pre-digital tools of expression. Although this doesn’t seem to have much to do with how we use ultra-modern services like Twitter or Facebook, there is a lot more to it than you might think....
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FBI Can Read Your Facebook Messages Without A Warrant

FBI Can Read Your Facebook Messages Without A Warrant | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
Documents obtained by the ACLU suggest that the FBI doesn't always obtain warrants when it searches emails and Facebook messages. (What Search Warrant?
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Big Data: Big Money, But Little Value

Big Data: Big Money, But Little Value | Social Network Analysis - Critique | Scoop.it
I don't think anyone is surprised that Big Data was a popular term at the RSA conference this year. As is often the case with information security, there was as much derision as promotion.
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