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Original Gameboy Gets Stuffed Full Of Cool Parts

Original Gameboy Gets Stuffed Full Of Cool Parts | Social Network Analysis | Scoop.it
One day at Good Will, [microbyter] came across an original Gameboy for $5. Who reading this post wouldn’t jump on a deal like that? [microbyter] was a little disappointed when he got home and found out that this retro portable did not work.

Via F. Thunus
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Metaphors Matter: Factor Structure vs. Correlation Network Maps

Metaphors Matter: Factor Structure vs. Correlation Network Maps | Social Network Analysis | Scoop.it
Metaphors Matter: Factor Structure vs. Correlation Network Maps. The psych R package includes a data set called "bfi" with self-report ratings on 25 personality items along a 6-point agreement scale.
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Rescooped by Lyle Wilson from Programme, Project and Change Management
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The Irony of Empowerment in Change: Kotter Theory vs. Practice

The Irony of Empowerment in Change:  Kotter Theory vs. Practice | Social Network Analysis | Scoop.it

As I thought about Push in the context of Kotter's model, I imagined the table you see above.  

In most "less than successful" change projects, the Tops drive steps 1, 2, and 3.  Step 4 is the Tops using HR or Communication to PUSH "their" change downhill.  


________________________

I found it ironic that what Kotter envisioned as empowerment is often the stage where resistance takes over.________________________

Because participation is normally restricted in steps 1, 2, and 3, the Middles & Bottoms lack ownership.  People support what they help create.  People do NOT support what they do NOT help create.  
I looked at Phillip's (McKinsey early 80s) change management model and thought about Kotter's 8 steps.  This is what it looks like to me:  

- See more at: http://www.howtochangemanagement.com/2013/05/kotter-theory-vs-practice.html#sthash.04w2HumJ.dpuf


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN, Harry Cannon
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Harry Cannon's comment, July 30, 2013 3:59 AM
Perhaps some see Kotter's steps as a formula? Follow the steps and it will work. But missing the poont about real and honest engagement and listening.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 30, 2013 10:12 AM
Yes, Harry, exactly! There are also communication problems in being too formulaic, Ron's companion post just added.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 7, 2013 11:17 AM

Ron has a helpful series on understanding how to fully use a change model for change leadership.  Both he and I are of the "Whole Scale Change" school of engagement for change, via the late Kathie Dannemiller, a respected consultant formerly from Ford and the University of Michigan. 

Ownership and productive tension of leadership at all levels can make a real different if change readiness and culture change are in the context of what is next and needed for your organization.


From Change Management Resources ~  Deb

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Top KDnuggets tweets, Jan 8-9: Great list of NLP APIs; Python ...

Top KDnuggets tweets, Jan 8-9: Great list of NLP APIs; Python ... | Social Network Analysis | Scoop.it
Top KDnuggets tweets, Jan 8-9: Great list of NLP APIs; Python erodes R hegemony, but do not go all-in Python now. Tweet ...
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Taking Street Photography to Another Level: Time-Squished Photos Turn Random Moments Into Patterns | Raw File | Wired.com

Taking Street Photography to Another Level: Time-Squished Photos Turn Random Moments Into Patterns | Raw File | Wired.com | Social Network Analysis | Scoop.it
Pelle Cass has put a new spin on people-watching and taken street photography to another level with his project Selected People. For each photo in the series, he essentially crushes time-lapse photography into a single frame.

Via Terry Woodward
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Terry Woodward's curator insight, June 29, 2013 11:37 AM

Our digital ability to work with data over time is opening novel ways to look at patterns