Social Mercor
Follow
Find tag "games"
4.1K views | +0 today
Social Mercor
Social Media Advertising & Social Network: www.socialmercor.net
Join Us! It's FREE!
Curated by Mercor
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mercor from The 21st Century
Scoop.it!

What Teachers Really Think About Game Based Learning

What Teachers Really Think About Game Based Learning | Social Mercor | Scoop.it

WeAreTeachers, an educational resource website, have released the results of a survey of 309 K–12 classroom teachers from public, private and religious schools across the country about their views on game based learning. We thought the results were very interesting, especially the statement ’81% of teachers feel students are more engaged when they are playing games’.  


Via Susan Bainbridge
more...
Ricard Garcia's comment, December 10, 2012 2:09 AM
I can't find the complete report in their website, just the infographic.
Rudy Azcuy's comment, December 10, 2012 8:55 AM
Ricard Garcia... I checked for the report on the WeAreTeachers site and they don't have it posted. They only have info on what is in the graphic...
EduClick_España's comment, April 22, 2013 6:18 AM
I'm affraid the full text report is not available. Will be checking for updating asap!
Rescooped by Mercor from The 21st Century
Scoop.it!

What’s Trending in Classroom Games?

What’s Trending in Classroom Games? | Social Mercor | Scoop.it
This infographic showcases how games help students learn and retain, engage and get motivated to learn and many more fascinating results.

Via Susan Bainbridge
more...
Ryan McDonough's curator insight, July 7, 5:09 PM

More evidence to support how games in the classroom improve student performance and learning retention. Being user-friendly, personalizing instruction, increasing engagement, and familiarity to technology based applications are reasons cited for their effectiveness. Games stimulate the brain, grabs and focuses attention, and motivate learning through stimulation, and allowing the user to take ownership by controlling their own actions. Infographics like this are a great tool to display on your classroom website or show at conferences. There's always going to be doubters when they hear the name "games" in school.