Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks
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Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks
How to read & write in social web: sharing, blogging, tweeting, collaborating, curating
Curated by Heiko Idensen
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Highlight and Share Text from Any Web Page Text Instantly: Awesome Highlighter

Highlight and Share Text from Any Web Page Text Instantly: Awesome Highlighter | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

This is a great little tool that makes it easy to select and highlight any text on any web page and then to share it easily with others.

 

The content you have selected, which can be highlighted in different colors and also annotated with post-it-like sticky notes, can be easily emailed, or shared directly on Facebook, Twitter, Delicious or onto any blog or web site via an "iframe" embed code.

 

Very easy to use, intuitive, and more effective than other methods.

 

The bookmarklet, makes it perfect: http://www.awesomehighlighter.com/user/welcome 

 

Recommended. 8/10

 

Try it out now: http://www.awesomehighlighter.com/ 


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Publish Short Texts To The Web Instantly: shortText.com

Publish Short Texts To The Web Instantly: shortText.com | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

shortText.com is a simple tool to post text online, with minimum fuss. You type your own text and you can publish it instantly, including links to images or videos, to a real web page. 

 

(Free urls will remain active as long as it is visited at least once in 6 months by anyone, after which we may purge the URL for others to use it.)

 

Warning: once you post something, is posted. No way to swtich back.

 

shortText also allows you to reduce the size of any text to 140 characters so that you can post it on Twitter. It does so by keeping the long text on shortText.com.

 

ShortText allows to keep a page private and to turn on or off the use of comments.

 

No sign ups, no sign in are required.

 

The service is completely free and it is ad supported.

 

Firefox Add-on: http://www.shorttext.com/twitzer.aspx 

*shortxt is a simple Addon which lets you post text longer than 140 characters on Twitter.com.

1) Just write as much text as you want in the Twitter box
2) Right click on the screen and select "Twitzer Text". It will shorten text to fit in 140

 

Chrome Extension: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/lgndmpfddmhonmjkgleaidcjjhdeplch 

 

FAQ: http://www.shorttext.com/faq.aspx 

 

Find out more: http://www.shorttext.com/ 

 

(Reviewed by Robin Good)


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iPad App Lets Kids Publish Physical Books

iPad App Lets Kids Publish Physical Books | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Sarah Kessler

http://mashable.com/author/sarah-kessler/

*** 

An iPad app from Scribble Press lets kids publish their own books.
***

Scribble Press has three brick-and-mortar stores where more than 30,000 children have created their own books. Now, with the help of the iPad, it’s gearing up to become a global business.
http://www.scribblepress.com/ipad2 

*** 

The company has launched a free iPad app that digitizes the coloring and writing process usually completed in its marker-lined studios. Within the next week, Scribble will begin publishing board books — the kind with cardboard covers thick enough to chew on — created with the app.
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/scribble-press/id487300076?mt=8 

***

“Most kids draw well before they write well,” says Scribble Press co-founder Anna Barber. “The iPad is a good medium for that, but the computer isn’t…The minute [the iPad] came out, I thought it was the perfect channel for what we were trying to do.”

***

There are plenty of websites that will publish a book you create, but dragging a mouse lacks the freedom of coloring, and scanning pages is a bother for mom and dad. Before the iPad, there wasn’t a good way to take Scribble Press’s “Build-A-Bear for books” experience outside of its stores. 
http://mashable.com/2009/03/01/publish-book/

*** 

In addition to ordering a professional-quality print of their book, young authors — whether writing from a store or their iPads — can increase their statuses as published authors by adding their creations to Scribble Press’s public ebook library. A 6 year old who wrote about his hearing implant, for instance, has had his book viewed 7,500 times ...

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Mercedes Bunz: Ebooks: Das Buch als Waffe; Digitalisierung bringt neue Dimensionen ins Reich des Schmökers

Mercedes Bunz: Ebooks: Das Buch als Waffe; Digitalisierung bringt neue Dimensionen ins Reich des Schmökers | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Mercedes Bunz in De:Bug 150
http://bit.ly/debug150

:::

... sehr schöne Reflexionen, ausgehend von Benjamins "Heuschreckenschwärme von Schrift" ... hin zu den revolutionären Möglichkeiten von ebooks im Social Web ...
Don't read it - feed it! 

:::

Wenn Bücher durchs Walzwerk der Digitalisierung eine neue Gestalt erhalten, ändert sich mehr als ein paar vertraute Gewohnheiten des Lesers. Denn Bücher sind nicht nur Schmökerstoff, sie können auch Menschen gruppieren, neue Welten erschaffen und alte in den Untergang schicken. Mercedes Bunz sondiert, wie es unter dem Druck der Digitalisierung ums Buch als Waffe steht.

((((( *** ))))

Und wenn genug Menschen sich mit einem Buch bewaffnen, wenn genug Menschen Sätze aus einem Buch nehmen und sie der Welt vorhalten, dann wird ein Buch zu einer neuen Galaxie: Marx, so hat Michel Foucault beispielsweise mal klug bemerkt, Marx ist nicht einfach der Autor des Manifestes oder des Kapitals. Autoren wie er werden erst zu Diskursbegründern, weil ihre Texte unbegrenzte Diskursmöglichkeit eröffnen: “charakteristische Zeichen, Figuren, Beziehungen, Strukturen, die von anderen wiederverwendet werden”, auf eine Weise wiederverwendet werden, die gegen das Bestehende gerichtet wird, mit andern Worten, das Buch wird politisch, es wird zu einer Waffe, und manchmal später, errichten sich ganze Nationen darauf, scheitern und schaffen neue Bücher. Dass sich um das Buch herum eine Community gruppiert, ist ein altes Feature. Das Kommunistische Manifest hat Fans, ganze Horden von ihnen, Parteien, dann Armeen und schließlich komplette Nationen gruppiert, also Menschen, die es als Plattform genutzt haben, um miteinander in Beziehung zu treten. Und in diesem Sinne sind soziale Medien als Ausweitung des Buches zu verstehen, und nicht als ihre Ablösung. 

 

((((( *Links* ))))

http://www.mercedes-bunz.de/ 

.. die tollen Bilder im Artikel stammen von
http://www.racheldejoode.com/

 

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The Browser | Writing Worth Reading

The Browser | Writing Worth Reading | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
A daily selection of the best features, comment and analysis articles from around the web: Each day, from 23rd to 26th December, we will be featuring twelve exceptional articles published in 2011, as selected by our editors. Happy Holidays!
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Korsakow — Dynamic Storytelling

Korsakow — Dynamic Storytelling | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
The Korsakow System (pronounced ‘KOR-SA-KOV’) is an easy-to-use computer program for the creation of database films. It was invented by Florian Thalhofer, a Berlin-based media artist. Korsakow Films are films with a twist: They are interactive – the viewer has influence on the K-Film. They are rule-based – the author decides on the rules by which the scenes relate to each other, but s/he does not create fixed paths. K-Films are generative – the order of the scenes is calculated while viewing. And, as Florian likes to say, Korsakow is not a religion. Here you will find a growing set of resources for all things Korsakow: Download the latest version for PCs and Intel Macs; view outstanding Korsakow Films in the Vernissage; find answers for your basic or advanced questions in our Quick Start, Tutorials and Tips & Tricks sections or our FAQs; discuss Korsakow with other users in the Forums; read about the people behind Korsakow, below; hear about updates and related events; and, discover what a SNU is. *** Dynamic Storytelling: In summer 2010, the Brazilian multimedia producer Giovanni Francischelli led a Korsakow workshop in Campinas, a city located in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. “I work with web-documentary films and I found Korsakow an excellent tool to develop such projects, so I decided to use the software in workshops on the subject”, he told us via email.
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Web-based Digital Storytelling Tools and Online Interactive Resources : Danny Maas, Emerging Technologies AISI Consultant

Web-based Digital Storytelling Tools and Online Interactive Resources : Danny Maas, Emerging Technologies AISI Consultant | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

There are many great websites that provide opportunities for students to develop language skills, tell stories, and share back their knowledge in fun, creative, and meaningful ways each using a computer. There are also terrific websites and portals which have links to excellent online interactives which can be used in the classroom with an interactive whiteboard. Below are links and short descriptions of these sites.

Underlying Beliefs:

  • Learning happens socially and through language
  • Expressing ideas through multiple forms of media can enhance and deepen the meaning-making process
  • Children benefit from opportunities to share what they know and how they feel in creative ways
  • Sharing ideas and understanding in the form of a story helps with memory retention and sense-making
  • Technology can offer learning opportunities consistent with a Universal Design for Learning environment:
  • Multiple means of representation (taking in information)
  • Multiple means of expression (sharing back knowledge)
  • Multiple means of engagement (motivation for learning)
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The What, Whys, and Hows - Digital Storytelling: A Toolkit for Educators - CampusGuides SLIS at Springshare

The What, Whys, and Hows - Digital Storytelling: A Toolkit for Educators - CampusGuides SLIS at Springshare | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
This guide provides links to current research about digital storytelling, why and how to teach it, apps and tools to use, successful examples, and copyright teaching tools. It is designed for use by teachers and librarians of students of all ages.
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Randy D. Nichols's curator insight, April 29, 2015 9:27 AM

A good overview of current approaches to digital story-telling...

Randy D. Nichols's curator insight, April 29, 2015 9:28 AM

A good overview of resources for and approaches to digital story-telling.

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Why do Social Media Communities Need to be Managed? « Radian6 - Social Media Monitoring and Engagement

Why do Social Media Communities Need to be Managed? « Radian6 - Social Media Monitoring and Engagement | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Over the past few years, we’ve seen the onset of Social Media Managers and Community Managers to help orchestrate everything “social” for both corporations and agencies. If you have been on the outside looking in at this social media revolution, you might have heard that the person responding to you is a Community Manager and that they see you as a part of their corporate global community. This might catch you a little off guard. It might even make you wonder about this person’s role and why you are engaging with them. So why do we have these jobs with “Community” in the title? Why are we trying to control how customer relationships grow? Why do we care so much about managing the experience of our community?
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Subtext Livens Up E-Books With Author Commentary and Social Reading

Subtext Livens Up E-Books With Author Commentary and Social Reading | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
A new social reading app called Subtext launches today on the iPad, with a selection of books laden with annotations from authors and researchers.
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Digital Literacies for Writing in Social Media | DMLcentral

Digital Literacies for Writing in Social Media | DMLcentral | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
The question we are faced with, then, is this: how do we prepare our students to write effectively in environments that don't yet exist? While I'm sure there is more to add to this list, I suggest that there are three domains of literacy that, if students become aware of them, will prepare them for new digital writing environments. Namely, students should be aware of the speed of digital communications and the types of interactions that speed encourages, the ways in which digital writing environments preserve and provide access to data, and how writing technologies manage the divide between public and private.

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Celebrate Writing: Why I Write | MindShift

Celebrate Writing: Why I Write | MindShift | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
This year, the National Writing Project has joined in the celebration, along with numerous other educational blogs and news outlets, asking people to share the reasons why they write. You can follow along the #whyiwrite hashtag on Twitter, and you’re encouraged to contribute your own essays, tweets, and blog posts.

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Interview: William Gibson

Interview: William Gibson | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

'The author and social critic on his first foray into non-fiction, his contributions to science fiction, and watching Jersey Shore in Mumbai.'

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Convert Your Blog Contents Into a Professionally Typeset Book: FeedFabrik

Convert Your Blog Contents Into a Professionally Typeset Book: FeedFabrik | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Generate a printed book from your blog by simply selecting a few options and letting FeedFabrik do the rest for you.

 

FeedFabrik can hook up with major blogging platforms such as Blogger, Wordpress (hosted and self-hosted), Typepad and Tmblr as well as photo sharing sites Picplsz and Instagram and can convert selected contents (you can specify a date range) to be formatted and printed as a physical book with cover, full table of contents and everything else you expect in a traditional book.

 

Once you have connected FeedFabrik with your blog, you are offered a number of options to configure the content to be published and the layout of the book.

The standard and only format available now is the A5, with both soft or hard-covers in black and white or color. Only one font is available right now and you can select which posts to incude only on the basis of a date range. The order of posts can be set to standard or reverse chronological order.

 

Three types of paper are available plain white paper, plain creme paper and photo quality paper.

 

FeedFabrik provides the user with three final output options: 

 

1) printed Book - starting at 7.45€ ($10)

 

2) PDF Book - 4.95€

 

3) PDF Proof - FREE

The print proof PDF file is a file that shows your book just like we send it to the printer. It is perfect to make sure that everything looks like you expect. The printed book will look the same. The print proof file has crop marks around the content which are used to cut the printed pages out of the larger print sheet.

 

You can order any number of print books: one or a hundred, and they will be shipped to you from Europe.

 

See an example: http://www.feedfabrik.com/bookfabrik/view/zszd8s 

 

Wordpress plugin: https://www.feedfabrik.com/blog/wordpress-printing-plugin 

 

Very interesting. 8/10

 

Find out more: https://www.feedfabrik.com/ 

 

(Reviewed by Robin Good)


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Science of the Invisible: It's academic publishing Jim, but not as we know it

Science of the Invisible: It's academic publishing Jim, but not as we know it | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
I invite reviews of the following original manuscript: An efficient and effective system for interactive student feedback using Google+ to enhance an institutional virtual learning environment (PDF download via Dropbox) Abstract: Whether or not you take a constructivist view of education, feedback on performance is inevitably seen as a crucial component of the process. However, experience shows that students (and academic staff) often struggle with feedback, which all too often fails to translate into feed-forward actions leading to educational gains. Problems get worse as student cohort sizes increase. By building on the well-established principle of separating marks from feedback and by using a social network approach to amplify peer discussion of assessed tasks, this paper describes an efficient system for interactive student feedback. Although the majority of students remain passive recipients in this system, they are still exposed to deeper reflection on assessed tasks than in traditional one-to-one feedback processes. *** the PDF: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/3416240/Googleplus_Feedback_ms_v1.pdf
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Who Word-Processed First? Professor's History Has Writers Staking Their Claim

Who Word-Processed First? Professor's History Has Writers Staking Their Claim | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Writers are approaching Matthew Kirschenbaum, a professor who is working on a history of word processing, to claim that they were the first to create novels using computers.

http://nyti.ms/iscoop49

***

In a recent blog post the science fiction writer Jerry Pournelle criticized Mr. Kirschenbaum for failing to award him bragging rights
as the first to complete a science fiction novel — and perhaps any kind of novel — on a computer.

http://jerrypournelle.com/chaosmanor/?p=4351

 

Not only did he begin writing fiction on a souped-up Z-80 PC named Zeke in the late 1970s, Mr. Pournelle noted, but his old computer is also currently in the collection of the Smithsonian, albeit in storage.

***

Mr. Pournelle was much friendlier in a phone conversation, said Mr. Kirschenbaum, as were the dozen or so other name-brand novelists who have gotten in touch since the article appeared to share reminiscences of computers past, like the best-selling crime writer Stuart Woods, who jokingly told Mr. Kirschenbaum that he had “invented” word processing in his head in the mid-1970s, but had to wait until 1979 to find a system he could actually afford. (His first novel, “Chiefs,” he said, was written on a PC.)

http://www.stuartwoods.com/

 ***

“Everyone has their own personal origin story,” Mr. Kirschenbaum said in an interview following up on the initial New York Times report. “There’s something about this subject that strikes a chord with people.” He declined to name the other well-known novelists he said had reached out to him, either directly or through an assistant. 

***

Newt Gingrich’s 1984 pro-computer futurist manifesto “Window of Opportunity”

http://nyti.ms/iscoop50

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Social Reading – Einsames Lesen war gestern. Zwischen den Zeilen, von der DRM-Fessel zur Zitat-Api

Social Reading – Einsames Lesen war gestern. Zwischen den Zeilen, von der DRM-Fessel zur Zitat-Api | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Sascha Kösch, De:Bug 150
http://bit.ly/debug150 

...

Sehr interessanter Artikel mit vielen Links und Resourcen!

((((((( """"""" ))))))

Das Resüme am Ende:

...

Am Ende dieses kurzen Überblicks fragt man sich, ob es wirklich schon Zeit ist für den Umstieg auf E-Books. PDFs erscheinen jetzt mal halbwegs zukunftssicher. Das EPub-Format auch, aber jeder Einstieg bedeutet entweder die Bindung an den Kopierschutz eines Herstellers, verbunden mit der Hoffnung, dass in einem zersplitterten Markt am Ende alles irgendwie zusammenwachsen könnte, oder schlichtes Ausharren, bis der Größte alles andere plattgemacht hat. Dabei könnte Social Reading so schön sein. Und wer sagt uns, dass das Buch in seiner klassischen Form überhaupt einen Wrapper wie EPub, PDFs oder ähnliches braucht? Schließlich ist es Text, und als Text wäre HTML heutzutage definitiv das flexibelste Format. Sicher werden wir in der Zukunft noch eine ähnliche Bewegung bei Büchern wie bei Musik sehen. Eine Auflösung von DRM, mehr CC-Releases, offene APIs auch jenseits von Google, und wer weiß, vielleicht sogar Bücher, die als Webseiten funktionieren und ihre Gelder über Anzeigen oder Spenden einspielen. Eine genaue Katalogisierung von Büchern jenseits ihres haptischen Deckels bis in die feinsten Teile ihrer Bestandteile ist längst möglich. Das merkt man nicht zuletzt an Zitaten, die man bei Google eingibt, die ja auf einem der größten Archive von Text sitzen. Und für genau diese Passagen braucht man eine digitale Adressierung, eine flexible und von jedem ansprechbare Zitat-API, denn erst dann wird das Reden über Text zu einem gemeinsamen und über verschiedenste Plattformen hinaus wirklich sozialen Lesen.

Post Scriptum
Mittlerweile hat Amazon eine neue Software eingeführt, und lässt einen jetzt Kommentare zu einzelnen Passagen für alle sichtbar machen. Gleichzeitig gibt es auch eine passende Webseite mit den meistkommentierten Büchern, die direkt wieder zur Kindle Software zurückleitet. Und im Versuch, einzelne Orte im Buch quer durch verschiedene Formate zu adressieren, gibt es jetzt auch – in manchen Büchern – die Seitenangaben aus dem gedruckten Buch obendrein. Ein erster wichtiger Schritt.

 

((((((( """Resourcen"""" ))))))


http://www.scribd.com

http://www.mendeley.com 

http://www.thecopia.com

http://www.goodreads.com

http://www.researchgate.net

http://www.bookglutton.com
...

Sascha Kösch auf twitter
https://twitter.com/#!/bleed

...
.. die tollen Bilder im Artikel stammen von
http://www.racheldejoode.com 

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Flipsnack – Create Awesome Flipping Books | Mark Brumley

Flipsnack – Create Awesome Flipping Books | Mark Brumley | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Flipsnack is one of my favorite web 2.0 tools! It converts PDF files into really cool flipping books. Using this site is a snap…simple upload your PDF and voila!Flipsnack works great for displaying student work or sending out information to parents. If you have an interactive whiteboard try this. Scan your best student work and load it to Flipsnack. Then have each student talk about their amazing work at the IWB. They can “flip” the pages by dragging…they’ll love it! Try it for parent night as well!
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The Future of Reading and Writing is Collaborative | Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning

The Future of Reading and Writing is Collaborative | Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

“The written word is coming to life by being a key part of multimedia,” Boardman said. “When people can not only pick up something by the written word, but also listen to it, see it move across the screen or see someone’s interpretation of that word through moving images, then I think it becomes much more alive.”
We find when writing moves online, the connections between ideas and people are much more apparent than they are in the context of a printed book.
– Bob Stein, Institute for the Future of the Book
Bob Stein is founder and co-director of the MacArthur-funded Institute for the Future of the Book, an organization premised on the idea that “the written page is giving way to the networked screen.”
Stein agrees with Boardman that our definition of writing must change to include audio, visual and graphical components. Take a moment to digest that, because it’s actually the easy part. What Stein is working on at the Institute is something deeper than just the idea of books and other kinds of writing becoming multimedia. He’s encouraging a complete transformation of the notion of ownership of writing altogether. ...

One of the Institute’s projects is CommentPress, an open-source plug-in for WordPress that aims to turn a document into a conversation (view examples here). Readers can comment on, say, an academic paper before it has gone to press and add insights and questions in the margins of the text.

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Twitter Parodies: 9 Top Literary Fakes

Twitter Parodies: 9 Top Literary Fakes | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
To tweet or not to tweet? That is the hilarious question posed by these great literary parody accounts.
It might be considered surprising that a platform that limits its users to 140 characters has so many literary-themed accounts. Our favorite of these are the parody accounts, spoofing famous authors from beyond the grave.

For the purposes of entertainment and inspiration, we’ve pulled together our best-of selection. Although there are many accounts that just push out the written word of authors, we’ve focussed on those that comment and engage using a particular author’s voice. ...
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10 Types Of Writing For eLearning: The eLearning Coach

10 Types Of Writing For eLearning: The eLearning Coach | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
When I started counting the types of writing that are potentially required to produce an online course, I was stunned. I realized that one instructional designer can potentially provide the skills of an entire writing department.
Not only do we need skills for expository, creative, persuasive and technical writing, but we often write about topics for which we know very little at first. Furthermore, our writing is expected to be motivating while clearly delivering concepts, procedures and facts.
Here you’ll find some brief guidelines that focus on each type of writing. Much of this writing is done in storyboards, so I didn’t include writing for storyboards as a separate type. What other types of writing for eLearning can you think of?
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Criticism: The value of blogging? | Oliver Quinlan

Criticism: The value of blogging? | Oliver Quinlan | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
This week I was interviewed by Ewan McIntosh as part of ‘Tweeting for Teachers‘, a report produced by NoTosh and Pearson CPL on social media use for the professional development of teachers. The focus of my interview was around ‘long form’ engagement with social media through the medium of blogging, and how I think it can be hugely valuable for professional development.

“What you want is for people to criticise you.”

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findings | THINK / Musings

findings | THINK / Musings | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

John Borthwick, OCT 25, ’11

Today at betaworks we are launching findings, a platform for sharing and discovering what people are reading. ...

... with the goal of creating a platform to help people collect, share and discover things they were reading. ...

“Unlike modern readers, who follow the flow of a narrative from beginning to end, early modern Englishmen read in fits and starts and jumped from book to book. They broke texts into fragments and assembled them into new patterns by transcribing them in different sections of their notebooks. Then they reread the copies and rearranged the patterns while adding more excerpts. Reading and writing were therefore inseparable activities. They belonged to a continuous effort to make sense of things, for the world was full of signs: you could read your way through it; and by keeping an account of your readings, you made a book of your own, one stamped with your personality.” (You can see the origin of this clip and others by Darnton on this page.)

This quote exemplifies how I read, and write, today. Despite this, the tools and the language of sharing quotes and marginalia are still only loosely formed.

***

You can see my bookshelf of what I’m reading here – this includes books as well as web pages from which I have clipped highlights that interest me

https://findings.com/john

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OccupyWriters.com

We, the undersigned writers and all who will join us, support Occupy Wall Street and the Occupy Movement around the Word !
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Jack Hart on “Storycraft” and narrative nonfiction as an American literary form – Nieman Storyboard - A project of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard

Jack Hart on “Storycraft” and narrative nonfiction as an American literary form – Nieman Storyboard - A project of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Breaking down story in every medium. A project of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at HThe popularity of online education is growing at a steady clip. Whether it’s due to the weak economy, quality of online tools, or the price difference… online schools can’t (and shouldn’t) be ignored. Heck, Bill Gates thinks online education tools like Khan Academy are the wave of the future.

But are they? Is an online degree worth the tremendous time and effort? Do online students have the same retention as students attending the standard brick-and-mortar schools? An insightful new infographic from Online PhD Programs shines a light onto some of the lesser-known statistics about online schooling while focusing on the current state of online schools.
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