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Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks
How to read & write in social web: sharing, blogging, tweeting, collaborating, curating
Curated by Heiko Idensen
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digital digs: research - teaching - assessment: constructing academic knowledge: how works the process by which knowledge is constructed?

digital digs: research - teaching - assessment: constructing academic knowledge: how works the process by which knowledge is constructed? | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Levi Bryant has a great post on the problem with the term "construction." I think his point echoes those that Latour has been making for some time.
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The alternative is a kind of anecdotal sharing. And I am fully in support of talking about teaching! As one of my grad school mentors, Steve North, discussed long ago, the "lore" of the hallway and office is one of the central sites of teaching knowledge. Lore has its own kind of networks, its own constructedness. However, lore has a different relationship than assessment to other (knowledge) objects. Conventionally we might say that when we shift from lore to scholarship about teaching that this is a purely discursive shift or that it is about social-power relations. These things are partly true I think, but they are only part of the story. The other part is that research is constructed differently and thus has different strengths in its mediation of network relations, and this construction is not "purely" discursive. It has to do with the world of objects as well.

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So, for example, we might anecdotally say that our undergrads are good at the close reading of texts but struggle with incorporating secondary sources, that they convey a real enthusiasm for the literature they read but are ambivalent about critical methods. (I don't know if any of these things are true. This is purely a hypothetical example.) Actually it's a little more than hypothetical. It reflects broad common assumptions about students and about what is difficult to do in English or more generally in college. These anecdotal things we say about students are largely stable over the years, but interestingly they have little impact on curriculum. We might exchange lore about how we try to address these concerns, but those exchanges do not add up to a substantive change. However we try, to whatever extent we try, anecdotal sharing doesn't create knowledge objects with the force necessary to make change happen.

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I think this is clearly evident.

However, we could start an assessment from the anecdotal hypothesis that students struggle with incorporating secondary sources into their writing. We could create a tool that measures these incorporations so that we might construct some knowledge across the program about student performance that might help us fine tune our anecdotal observations and link them together with greater strength. Then (the big step), we might move the issue out of the student and into the network. That is, rather than identifying poor research practices as a student deficiency, we could understand them as a network effect. We could ask, how could we alter the conditions of the classroom and the curriculum to alter this network effect? This goes far beyond the advice of lore because it demands a significant shift in the conditions in the department: a shift that lore is not strong enough to produce.

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This is why, when it comes to assessment, I always ask "What kind of knowledge would we require in order to make a substantive change?" That question asks not only about the specific knowledge statement but the process by which the knowledge is constructed. Anecdotes are not strong enough. And my concern for the humanities is that it doesn't believe that any knowledge is strong enough to make such decisions. This, of course, does not mean that curriculum doesn't happen or that changes don't occur. It simply means that we deny ourselves the opportunity to produce knowledge that is strong enough to inform decision-making. Instead we are left with individual feelings, opinions, and beliefs and whatever they amount to. A skeptic might say that this is all that humanistic knowledge has ever been. 


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Authors | Here Are 10 Reasons Why Google Plus is Better than Facebook

Authors | Here Are 10 Reasons Why Google Plus is Better than Facebook | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Fay, a mother and a musician, described how she was able to network with a whole worldwide community of musicians through Google + and even “jam” with musicians across the world through Google +’s video chat feature called Hangouts.


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Many students still prefer regular textbooks over e-books

Many students still prefer regular textbooks over e-books | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

As more textbook publishing companies produce a greater number of digital textbooks – or e-books – college students are expected to purchase these electronic versions in increasing numbers as time goes on.


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Teach the Books, Touch the Heart: FRANZ KAFKA wrote that “a book must be the ax for the frozen sea inside us.”

Teach the Books, Touch the Heart: FRANZ KAFKA wrote that “a book must be the ax for the frozen sea inside us.” | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Teaching English simply for test preparation rather than to develop a love of literature is a mistake.

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By CLAIRE NEEDELL HOLLANDER.  April 20, 2012

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FRANZ KAFKA wrote that “a book must be the ax for the frozen sea inside us.” I once shared this quotation with a class of seventh graders, and it didn’t seem to require any explanation.
Related in Opinion

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Times Topic: Education
We’d just finished John Steinbeck’s “Of Mice and Men.” When we read the end together out loud in class, my toughest boy, a star basketball player, wept a little, and so did I. “Are you crying?” one girl asked, as she crept out of her chair to get a closer look. “I am,” I told her, “and the funny thing is I’ve read it many times.”

...


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How Books Will Survive Amazon in the dying Gutenberg age

How Books Will Survive Amazon in the dying Gutenberg age | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Today’s publishers, still entangled in the dying Gutenberg age, will, one hopes, spin off their talented editors as semi-autonomous units and gradually disencumber themselves of their obsolete infrastructure.


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Capture, Annotate and Organize Content Into Collages, Books or Flows with Surfmark

Capture, Annotate and Organize Content Into Collages, Books or Flows with Surfmark | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Surfmark is a new content curation service introducing some innovative and forward-looking features.

 

Surfmark in fact provides not only standard capabilities to easily capture, collect and organize content from any web page, but it adds intelligently alternative display formats to allow the exploration of such collections in multiple ways.

 

Another key innovative feature of Surfmark is its ability to generate bibliographies and summaries of content collections.

 

Surfmark allows social collaborative curation, history of all edits made, and the ability to share publicly or keep a collection private.

 

Collections can be downloaded in PDF or text formats and all pages saved in a collection are fully preserved with all the formatting and links intact so that you can refer back to exactly what you saw. 

 

Free to use. 

 

FAQ: http://blog.surfmark.net/surfmark-help/ 

 

Try out and more info: http://www.surfmark.com/ 

 

(thanks to Ana Cristina Pratas for discovering this) 


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Beth Kanter's comment, April 26, 2012 8:49 AM
Could be so useful for research for curriculum development
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The Participatory Documentary CookBook: community documentary using social media | i-docs

The Participatory Documentary CookBook: community documentary using social media | i-docs | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
“A participatory documentary tells a story about a community using the community’s own words. That story is disseminated back to that community via social media.” (Weight, 4:2011)
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Now available free, it is a textbook for creating participatory documentaries using social media. Aimed at people who can take photos and engage with basic social media, it seeks to leverage the social web to create niche community-based documentaries. You will learn how to create a semi-professional project without spending any money on gear or software. The cookbook is available as a PDF download. An enhanced iPad version with video and audio content will shortly be available at the Apple iBookstore, also free.
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Book flash mob

Book flash mob | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Organized locally by the Friends of the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, Wednesday’s event lasted 15 minutes. Participants were asked to wear a yellow hat, to gather at the assigned location at the assigned time and to start reading. The idea was that when a passerby asked one of the yellow-hatted readers what was going on, the reader would hand their book to that person.
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Stefani McRae-Dickey walked up to a complete stranger downtown and handed her a book. She assured the woman, Phyllis Witham, that the book — “The Kite Runner” by Khaled Hosseini — is excellent.

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McRae-Dickey was one of a dozen people who convened Wednesday on both sides of Second Street between Jefferson and Madison avenues as part of a globally coordinated book-reading flash mob. The event was held around the world at the same time — 4 p.m. — in each area’s respective time zone.
“The idea is to pay it forward and give back to the community,” McRae-Dickey said. “It’s sharing something that was meaningful in our lives.”

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How the eBook Revived Our Love for Literature « Literacy Help « Articles « Literacy News

How the eBook Revived Our Love for Literature « Literacy Help « Articles « Literacy News | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
It seems as if a very silent revolution is transpiring before our very eyes.
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The renewed love for literature is most certainly a good thing and an unsung positive association with the upcoming generation. However, whether an eBook is a better source for written material is a completely different debate. Perhaps the whole idea of requiring an emotional bond with a book is rather illogical and ignorant of the fact that such bonds are made while reading the actual text, not by holding the work in one’s hand. However, whether reading off a screen is healthier for the eyes and brain is also a matter that needs conclusive research (much has been analysed though, at the moment; the results of different studies are contradictory). Thus for the moment, the conclusion is that due to things still being fresh and findings being inconclusive, further results are awaited in order to form a sound conclusion. You might need to re-read that last sentence several times, and maybe even print it off into paper form to understand it!
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Caitlin Fisher: Interface Epistemology: Hypermedia Work in the Academy | Early Hypertext-Studies for "active readers"

Caitlin Fisher: Interface Epistemology: Hypermedia Work in the Academy | Early Hypertext-Studies for "active readers" | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

I want to tell you a bit about the story of writing and reading that project a native hypermedia work completed at York University in 2000 just as that institution was circulating a discussion paper proposing that all electronic dissertations be submitted with 12 point Times Roman font and one-and-a-half inch margins regardless: the future of writing as pdf. Then, as now, I saw the future of writing somewhat differently: I was particularly interested in the epistemological status of interface, especially the capacity of interfaces to make connections and arguments intelligible to readers.

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When I began to conceptualize my doctoral project, I assumed initially that I would look at a handful of hypertexts that I could argue were radical or otherwise interesting in terms of narrative strategies and use of code, make claims for their feminism and then allow these works to guide my exploration of the newness of the medium.

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The process of actually working with these texts, however and my own experience of encountering hypertext as familiar, as a continuation of my own writing practices forced a reconsideration of my investment in theorizing hypertext as presenting anything like a radical rupture with experimental practices over the last century.

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I opted instead to situate feminist hypertext in terms of its continuity with other experimental writing and visual practices and as my definition became more fluid, the dissertation grew to accommodate many different texts, practices and images, many of them not contemporary or digital at all.

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And this wide-ranging interdisciplinary approach to how literary and argumentative hypertext might be brought together in conversation, how images and text work in a hypertext environment, how feminist theories of print and film, autobiography and critifiction, desire and social difference might engage hypermedia practice resonated strongly with an interest in boundary-crossing evident in both hypertext and feminist scholarship.

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Im working to port it back from the html into a form more suggestive of the constellation Id like to share maybe add a dash more pleasure and give up a bit of jouissance. Im working with Thinkmap software a commercial solution that allows for the construction of a dynamic 3-dimensional interface to the archive Ive built, to arrive at an interface that will at least suggest to readers a sense of breadth, the argument I make for the necessity of a shifting conceptual center to the work, and a way of navigating the piece that invites an understanding of the arguments about interrelationships I try to make. Im also thinking of porting the whole experience to augmented reality, in the end a full body thinkmap interface where 1400 nodes can hang like stars, sewn together with virtual string, ready for walk-through.

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What is at stake more generally with respect to knowledge and theory-production here? Which of our interfaces are successes? Failures? For early hypertext practitioner Michael Joyce the litmus test of any hypertext was whether it allowed its users to look at knowledge in new ways. To that I would simply add that working mindfully at the interface gives us new tools to build knowledge, too, to craft knowledge in new ways. Even as my own early work risked intelligibility, this labour was well worth the risk.

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Rise in E-Book Readership Is Good News for Reading Over All, Report Says - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Rise in E-Book Readership Is Good News for Reading Over All, Report Says - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
“They’re heavier readers. They’re more frequent readers,” said Lee Rainie, director of the Pew Internet & American Life Project, the group behind the report. “These devices have allowed them to scratch that itch.”

The report, “The Rise of eReading,” analyzes findings from a survey of almost 3,000 people nationwide in November and December 2011, along with data from follow-up surveys of about 2,000 people in January and February 2012. Twenty-one percent of respondents reported, as of February 2012, that they had read an e-book in the past year. That figure was up from 17 percent in December 2011, before the holiday surge in purchases of e-readers and tablets. The average e-book reader said he or she had read 24 books (electronic and print) in the past 12 months. Those who didn’t read e-books averaged 15 books over the same time period.
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What book publishers should learn from Harry Potter: Memo to publishers: DRM is not your friend

What book publishers should learn from Harry Potter: Memo to publishers: DRM is not your friend | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Author J.K. Rowling has chosen to do a number of interesting things with the launch of the e-book versions of her Harry Potter series.
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After months of anticipation, the e-book versions of author J.K. Rowling’s phenomenally successful Harry Potter series are now available through Rowling’s Pottermore online unit, and as my PaidContent colleague Laura Owen has noted in her post on the launch, Rowling has chosen to do a number of interesting things with her e-books, including releasing them without digital-rights management restrictions. Obviously, the success of the Potter series has given Rowling the ability to effectively dictate terms to just about anyone, even a powerhouse like Amazon, but there are still lessons that other book publishers should take from what she is doing. 

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One of the encouraging things about the Pottermore launch is that the books will be available on virtually every platform simultaneously, including the Sony Reader, the Nook from Barnes & Noble, the Kindle and Google’s e-book service (which is part of Google Play).


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Create EPUB eBooks with Adobe InDesign

Create EPUB eBooks with Adobe InDesign | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

I keep getting questions on how to create EPUB from InDesign, so am pointing out some resources on Adobe.com on how to create EPUB eBooks using Adobe InDesign. There are quite a few resources on Adobe.com, and you can use to bring yourself quickly up-to-date, and start publishing EPUBs.

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Getting Great Blog Content - The Neil Patel Method

Getting Great Blog Content - The Neil Patel Method | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
As a business owner, it may be hard to delegate time for yourself or your employees to write quality content for your blog vs. work on revenue generating projects.


And when it comes to content, we’re not talking about just any content, but content that people want to read, search engines want to crawl, and social media users want to share.


Finding Guest Bloggers

One of the first things to increase the content on your blog, is including guest bloggers to help you out. Guest bloggers get a lot of benefits by writing for other sites, including yours, such as exposure to a new audience, the chance to build their authority, and the ability to build quality links back to their own blog or website.


How to Create Guest Blogging Guidelines

The easiest way to attract guest bloggers to your blog is through the creation of a guest blogging guidelines page.  

Share details by including the following:  http://bit.ly/J5KCHB

 

**Your impressive blog stats

**Your audience’s interests and demographics

**What topics your blog covers

**What level of content you need

**Content originality

**Post formatting details

**Post submission requirements

**Community rules

**Self-promotion rules

**Disclaimers


What to Look for in Guest Post Submissions

You will want to make sure the content meets the quality standards of your blog by reading it thoroughly and checking for a few key things:


**Is the content original?

**Who is the author?

**Where does the author link to?


Establishing an Editorial Calendar

No matter where you get your online content from, whether it is guest bloggers or freelance writers, be sure to create an editorial calendar. 


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7 Blogging Mistakes That Small Businesses Make

7 Blogging Mistakes That Small Businesses Make | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Many small businesses have turned to blogging as a way to engage and further connect with customers. But making mistakes in your blog can kill your business. Here are some of the biggest to avoid.

 

Blogging for your business is important, but doing it wrong can cost you customers and your reputation. As more and more small businesses enter the world of content development, the scrutiny continues to increase. Consumers can be retained or lost simply from your blogging efforts, so its imperative this public-facing activity is done correctly.

 

In this guide, we'll explore why small businesses should have a blog, a company that is doing it right, the biggest mistakes made by small businesses, and how to avoid those potential pitfalls.

 

7 Blogging Mistakes that Small Businesses Make: Why Start a Blog?

 

Read more: http://bit.ly/IX3t9i


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How To Get A Book Published | WritersDigestShop

How To Get A Book Published | WritersDigestShop | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
You're about to discover the best writing books to help you write fiction, nonfiction, novels, poetry, shortsStories, get published & market your writing...

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For any writer who aspires to be an author, knowing how to get a book published is essential. It's a common scenario — you have an idea for a book but you have no way of knowing how to translate that idea from your computer screen into print or online.

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Now, more than at any other time in history, there are more opportunities and possibilities to write, share, and publish a story — and interact with an audience. Whether you are after the traditional publishing experience, complete with an agent, editor, and publisher, or want to self publish your book, it's completely within your grasp. You decide what works best for you and your work.

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We're going to guide you through the book publishing process and give you the resources to choose which publishing option fits your work best. But first, you should know about traditional and self-publishing.

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Bull beware: Truth goggles sniff out suspicious sentences in news: software that can highlight false claims in articles, just like spell check

Bull beware: Truth goggles sniff out suspicious sentences in news: software that can highlight false claims in articles, just like spell check | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

A graduate student at the MIT Media Lab is writing software that can highlight false claims in articles, just like spell check.


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The DNA Code for Building Great Content | Content Marketing Institute

The DNA Code for Building Great Content | Content Marketing Institute | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

This piece was written by ahava-leibta for contentmarketinginstitute

 

"They all have four key elements that make up the code for building great content".

 

Here are some highlights:

 

There are some basic steps you need to follow before you apply these elements to have a successful campaign:

 

**Branding/messaging: Who are you, and what do you represent and offer? What       do you need to say?

 

**How can you provide value to your customers?

 

**User profiles or personas: Who are you trying to reach?

 

**What do they care about?

 

**Where and across what channels do they consume content?

 

**Define the campaign

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Marketing, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/IeWzxV]


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WordPress Plugins for Writers | Word Grrls

WordPress Plugins for Writers | Word Grrls | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

I got the idea to make a post about WordPress plugins for writers. I use a few which help me and thought I’d share them. But, I found something interesting when I started looking around to see what other writers like to use. Almost every plugin written about as being “for writers” was for SEO in blogging. Almost none of the plugins reviewed as “for writers” were about writing. Does anyone else think that’s kind of a sad reflection on writing?

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Here are the plugins I use which help me with actual writing online (not blog promoting – but blog writing).

  • Custom About Author - Add your social media links and a blurb about yourself to the end of each of your posts.
  • Dashboard: Scheduled Posts – This adds a feature to your WordPress desktop where you can store and view posts you have marked as scheduled/ saved as drafts to be finished later. I use this a lot!
  • Sideblog WordPress Plugin – Run a side blog (in your sidebar) for short posts like quotes and notes.
  • Drop Caps – I used this for awhile but didn’t stick with it. Fun for awhile, but not essential. It does work and was simple to set up.
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Kullect Reinvents Blogging for the Smartphone Era

Kullect Reinvents Blogging for the Smartphone Era | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
But I think it has promise, and I’m particularly intrigued by the way Reddy and Mascia have transcended simple media sharing, through design choices that make Kullect into something more like a tool for storytelling.

 

How is storytelling different from media sharing? Open up any of today’s top mobile media-sharing networks on your smartphone—like Instagram or Picplz for photos, Klip for videos, or Path for group sharing—and what you see is a random stream of disconnected items, stretching infinitely from today into last week, last month, and last year. Each individual item in a stream may represent somebody’s special moment or act of curation, but there are no mechanisms within these platforms for ordering things or imposing a theme. No pattern emerges. It’s just one damn thing after another.


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Hackpad: superb collaborative notepad site. Easily link to videos, audio, images, websites and other notepad pages.

Hackpad:  superb collaborative notepad site. Easily link to videos, audio, images, websites and other notepad pages. | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Joe Brockmeier, March 12, 2012

A superb collaborative notepad site. Easily link to videos, audio, images, websites and other notepad pages.

http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ICT+%26+Web+Tools
...
Once you're signed up, you can start creating new pads. Hackpad provides most of the features you'd expect from wikis, and a number of features that you wouldn't expect.

The collaboration features allow you to invite users to your "pads" and edit documents in real time. There's a very slight lag when another user is editing the same pad, but it's negligible.

If you're working on code of some sort, Hackpad offers syntax highlighting for HTML, JavaScript, C, SQL, Java, CoffeeScript, and a number of other languages and markup syntaxes.

You can create a new pad while you're editing another one by using "@" symbol. This makes it really easy to create new pads and you don't have to use the normal annoying wiki syntax for pages. You can also "notify" people who have Hackpad accounts with the @username syntax, which will send them an email.

Hackpad also supports to-do lists, just by dropping in a "[]" you can add a checklist item. This makes it dead easy to create a checklist for a team, or just for yourself.

Hackpad supports rich media, if you drop in links from supported sites. For instance, drop in a link to a YouTube video and you'll get a preview of the video. This also works with Vimeo, SoundCloud, Flickr, Slideshare, Google Maps, TED, and a number of other sites.
Best Wiki Ever? Hackpad Just Might Be

 

 


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Epublishing in China lets writers avoid censorship | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics

Epublishing in China lets writers avoid censorship | TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
From The Guardian's Books Blog: ...Most of these e-novels are pure entertainment, written, downloaded, read and deleted all at top speed … but...Most of these e-novels are “pure entertainment, written, downloaded, read and deleted all at top speed …” but e–publishing attracts serious writers as well, for a rather different reason: it offers a smidgen of freedom from censorship regulations which hamstring conventional publishers. One very successful internet author is Murong Xuecun. In 2002, he put his first novel Leave Me Alone: A Novel of Chengdu online. It caused enough of a stir to be taken up by a publisher, subsequently won prizes and has been translated. Murong has been, and continues to be, an outspoken critic of the Chinese system, which he calls “rotten” and “corrupt”, and he continues to publish his criticisms online.
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However, serious authors are unlikely to limit themselves to e-publishing. Print books pay better, or at least more reliably, and have lost none of their prestige. (Almost all literary prizes are awarded only to printed books, with the exception of the prestigious Mao Dun Literature prize which admitted e-published novels for the first time in 2011; of an overall 178 entries, none of the eight e-novels won an award.) So Murong successfully straddles these two worlds: he publishes a full version online, and his publisher brings out a bowdlerised edition.
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Evaluating e-Book Offerings

Slideshare from Elyssa Kroski Given at the DLIS St. John's Symposium, March 24, 2012.


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Reading, writing, tweeting | Chicago Tribune

Reading, writing, tweeting | Chicago Tribune | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Via The Committed Sardine

By Michelle Manchir

 

Description by Ian Jukes

"Check out how Twitter, mobile tech, and other social media is engaging and helping 1st-grade students at Abraham Lincoln Elementary in Glen Ellyn learn foundational literacy and typing skills in this Chicago Tribune article. In addition, through blogging and video sharing, these kids are also practicing valuable digital citizenship skills as they learn about our lives online."


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Electronic Books/Writing Tools - Web 2.0 in Education (UK)

Electronic Books/Writing Tools - Web 2.0 in Education (UK) | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

The tools on this page make use of traditional book elements (text and photos) to create electronic books. In many cases the books can also be printed if desired but having them published online gives them an immediate audience.

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