Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks
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Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks
How to read & write in social web: sharing, blogging, tweeting, collaborating, curating
Curated by Heiko Idensen
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Siri, Take This Down: Will Voice Control Shape Our Writing?

Siri, Take This Down: Will Voice Control Shape Our Writing? | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Do our writing means change our written ends?
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Bringing Maker-Style Garage Tinkering Into the Local Library - Culture - GOOD

Bringing Maker-Style Garage Tinkering Into the Local Library - Culture - GOOD | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Local libraries are no longer just reading rooms. They're becoming noisy, interactive, hands-on laboratories of innovation.
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HQ Books - TopHQBooks.com

HQ Books - TopHQBooks.com | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Need to find pdf? HQ books, tutorials, user guides, manuals, and more on TopHQBooks.com...


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@CristobalCobo University of Oxford Learning 2.0

Scribd is the world's largest social reading and publishing site.
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E-Book Is Reading You

E-Book Is Reading You | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Digital-book publishers and retailers now know more about their readers than ever before. How that's changing the experience of reading.
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It takes the average reader just seven hours to read the final book in Suzanne Collins's "Hunger Games" trilogy on the Kobo e-reader—about 57 pages an hour. Nearly 18,000 Kindle readers have highlighted the same line from the second book in the series: "Because sometimes things happen to people and they're not equipped to deal with them." And on Barnes & Noble's Nook, the first thing that most readers do upon finishing the first "Hunger Games" book is to download the next one.
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How To Talk About Books You Haven’t Read

How To Talk About Books You Haven’t Read | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

'The paradox of reading is that the path toward ourselves passes through books, but that this must remain a passage.'

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Readmill Introduces Cloud-Based Library And New Export Option -- AppAdvice

Readmill Introduces Cloud-Based Library And New Export Option -- AppAdvice | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Readability has once again updated its app to take advantage of a promising new feature thats likely to send tech-savvy readers onto cloud nine.
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Using Schoology and Small Group Collaboration to create student voice. | Where the Classroom Ends

Using Schoology and Small Group Collaboration to create student voice. | Where the Classroom Ends | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Discuss as a class what this means about them, their writing style, etc.  Sort students into groups of three based upon varying style characteristics.  You will want to make sure that your small groups have three different types of student “voices.”

Now, the next step depends on what applications you already use in the classroom. You could use Edmodo or Wallwisher and modify the assignment for use in those programs.  I personally like Schoology the best.  Its resemblance to Facebook is a selling point for students and it’s so neat and tidy in organization that it makes it easy to construct separate discussion threads within the program.  This will take some outside of classroom time to set up this exercise.

Create a schoology account for yourself and have your students sign up for their own, as well.  For each class you create the program will create a code.  When students are creating their accounts they will need that “code” in order to sign up for our class.  When you’ve done all of the grunt work you/your students should see this:
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You’ll want to click the discussion thread and create a discussion thread group for each group of three.  This means in each class you’ll probably have 10-15 discussion groups.  You will be given the choice for each group to upload directions as well.

The sky’s the limit.  If you teach AP students, use this exercise for voice in their AP analysis.  If you’re teaching the personal essay, give them a topic and then have them construct the response reply by reply by reply.  Of course, you won’t want to do this for the entirety of any essay, so choose an intro paragraph, a body paragraph, a conclusion, anything.

Since Schoology’s format is similar to the Facebook “wall” function, you can students in small groups reply to each other’s writing.   Have them consider that they can’t alter the line coming before theirs, they simply have to “add” to the previous line using their own writing style to inform the creation of this assignment.  When finished, have students type their replies into a new post for that discussion thread.  See the “dummy” example below.
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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 23, 2013 8:50 AM

Voice being one of the hardest things to teach--this would be worth a try.

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Rhizomatic Philosophy!

Rhizomatic Philosophy! | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Here is a concise and somehow cryptic summary of some ideas that will be explained and developped in the Vol. 2 of "The semantic Sphere". 


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The Virtues of Blogging as Scholarly Activity - The Digital Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Virtues of Blogging as Scholarly Activity - The Digital Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

In terms of intellectual fulfillment, creativity, networking, impact, productivity, and overall benefit to my scholarly life, blogging wins hands down. I have written books, produced online courses, led research efforts, and directed a number of university projects. While these have all been fulfilling, blogging tops the list because of its room for experimentation and potential to connect to timely intelligent debate. That keeps blogging at the top of the heap

Martin Weller, April 29, 2012

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This trend is evident in academic practice. Previously if I wanted to convey an idea or a research finding, my choices were limited to a conference paper or journal article or, if I could work it up, a book. These choices still remain, but in addition I can create a video, podcast, blog post, slidecast, and more. It may be that a combination of these is ideal—a blog post gets immediate reaction and can then be worked into a conference presentation, shared through SlideShare, or turned into a paper that is submitted to a journal. In each case the blog or social network becomes a key route for sharing and disseminating the findings. One recent study suggests that use of Twitter, for instance, can both boost and predict citations of journal articles.

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So blogging works for me, but it might not work for you. Maybe you're more of a YouTube person, or a podcaster, or maybe your skill really lies in acting as a filter and a curator, using a tool such as Scoop.it, which allows you to curate and share resources on a particular topic. Or maybe you're the trusted source for finding the valuable research in your field. It's clear, though, that our academic ecosystem

is a more complex one now. This raises two difficult questions for academics who are expected to do research: First, do these new types of activity count as scholarship? And, if so, how do we recognize and reward them?

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In my book The Digital Scholar: How Technology Is Transforming Scholarly Practice (Bloomsbury USA, 2011; free online),

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http://www.bloomsburyacademic.com/view/DigitalScholar_9781849666275/book-ba-9781849666275.xml

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I argue that if you look across all scholarly activities, the use of new technology has the potential to change practice. For example, those who teach now have access to abundant, free, online content, while in the past teaching resources were often scarce and expensive.

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Digital, Networked and Open : The Digital Scholar: How Technology Is Transforming Scholarly Practice : Bloomsbury Academic

Digital, Networked and Open : The Digital Scholar: How Technology Is Transforming Scholarly Practice : Bloomsbury Academic | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Digital, Networked and Open

‘Dad, you know that book you're writing, what's it about?’ my daughter asked, as I walked her to school.

The ‘elevator pitch’ is always difficult for academics, who prefer to take their time to explain things in depth and give all sides to an argument. An elevator pitch for a nine-year-old is almost impossible.

‘Well,’ I pondered, ‘it's about how using technology like the Internet, dad's blog, and Wikipedia is changing the way people like daddy work.’ Having recently completed a school project, she was well acquainted with Wikipedia.

She considered this and then concluded, ‘da-aaaaad, no one's going to want to read that!’

I fear she may be right, but I realised I have been writing this book for the past four years, mainly through my blog, which I have been using to explore what the advent of technologies, which offer new ways of communicating, collaborating and creating knowledge, mean for higher education. I figured if it had kept me interested for this long, it might be useful to share some of that with others.
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A tale of two books

So what are these new ways of working that I had hinted at to my daughter? I'll start with an example that is in your hands now – the process of writing this book. Six years ago I wrote my last book, and halfway through writing this, I thought I'd compare the two processes. Below is a list of some of the tools and resources I used to write this book:

  • Books – they were accessed via the library but increasingly as e-books, and one audiobook.
  • E-journals – my university library has access to a wide range of databases, but I also made frequent use of others through tools such as Google Scholar and Mendeley.
  • Delicious/social bookmarking – as well as searching for key terms I would ‘forage’ in the bookmarks of people I know and trust, who make their collections available.
  • Blogs – I subscribe to more than 100 blogs in Google Reader, which I try to read regularly, but in addition I have cited and used many posts from other blogs.
  • YouTube, Wikipedia, Slideshare, Scribd, Cloudworks and other sites – text is not the only medium for sharing now, and for certain subjects these ‘Web 2.0’ services offer useful starting points, or overviews, as well as insightful comment.
  • My own blog – I have kept a blog for around five years now, and it provided a useful resource for items I have commented on and drafts of sections of this book. I also keep a scrapbook-type blog using Tumblr where I post any interesting links or multimedia and revisited this for resources I had harvested over the past few years. The blog was also a means of posting draft content to gain comments and feedback, which could then be incorporated into further iterations of writing.
  • Social network – my Twitter network is especially useful for gaining feedback, asking for suggestions and, on a daily basis, as a filter and collection mechanism for sharing resources.
  • Work and personal network – undoubtedly working in an intellectually lively environment and having face-to-face discussions with colleagues have been invaluable.
  • Google alerts – I have set up alerts for a few key phrases which would then provide me with daily email updates on new content containing these keywords. This allowed me to find new resources, track conversations and stay abreast of a field which was changing as I wrote the book.
  • Seminars and conferences – my attendance at face-to-face conferences has declined due to other commitments, but I regularly attend or dip into conferences remotely (see Chapter 10 for a more detailed exploration of the changing nature of conferences). 
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The rise of e-reading: The increasing availability of e-content is prompting some to read more + to prefer buying books to borrowing

The rise of e-reading: The increasing availability of e-content is prompting some to read more + to prefer buying books to borrowing | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

by Lee Rainie, Kathryn Zickuhr, Kristen Purcell, Mary Madden and Joanna Brenner, Released: April 4, 2012

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21% of Americans have read an e-book. The increasing availability of e-content is prompting some to read more than in the past and to prefer buying books to borrowing them.

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One-fifth of American adults (21%) report that they have read an e-book in the past year, and this number increased following a gift-giving season that saw a spike in the ownership of both tablet computers and e-book reading devices such as the original Kindles and Nooks.1 In mid-December 2011, 17% of American adults had reported they read an e-book in the previous year; by February, 2012, the share increased to 21%.

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The rise of e-books in American culture is part of a larger story about a shift from printed to digital material. Using a broader definition of e-content in a survey ending in December 2011, some 43% of Americans age 16 and older say they have either read an e-book in the past year or have read other long-form content such as magazines, journals, and news articles in digital format on an e-book reader, tablet computer, regular computer, or cell phone.

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Those who have taken the plunge into reading e-books stand out in almost every way from other kinds of readers. Foremost, they are relatively avid readers of books in all formats: 88% of those who read e-books in the past 12 months also read printed books.2 Compared with other book readers, they read more books. They read more frequently for a host of reasons: for pleasure, for research, for current events, and for work or school. They are also more likely than others to have bought their most recent book, rather than borrowed it, and they are more likely than others to say they prefer to purchase books in general, often starting their search online.

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The growing popularity of e-books and the adoption of specialized e-book reading devices are documented in a series of new nationally representative surveys by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project that look at the public’s general reading habits, their consumption of print books, e-books and audiobooks, and their attitudes about the changing ways that books are made available to the public.

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Ebooks herald the second coming of books in university social science: a renaissance of books: the digital publishing shift, changes in academic practices , multi #authorship blogs

Ebooks herald the second coming of books in university social science: a renaissance of books: the digital publishing shift, changes in academic practices , multi #authorship blogs | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Books at last are going digital – bringing to an end the futile period of paper books losing out to digital journals. With prices falling and instant availability leading to the growth of people reading ebooks, Patrick Dunleavy foresees a renaissance of books as a major format in social science teaching, research, and impacts work. This push-back is strongly supported by the increasing emphasis on the impacts agenda; by increased attention to citations and real audience sizes; and by improved professionalism in the communication of the social sciences.

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This year we reached a turning point in the unavailing struggle of conservative publishers (and authors) to stick with paper books in a digital age. (1) At last academic books across the social sciences have begun to go digital in enough numbers, and in the right useable formats, to be competitive again in social science teaching. There are two foundations for forecasting a renaissance of books’ influence across the social sciences – first, the digital publishing shift itself; and second, a range of other supportive changes in academic practices.

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The digital shift in academic publishing

Summing up the lessons of digital change for higher education, Larry Summers (2) recently remarked: ‘Things take longer to happen than you think they will, and then happen faster than you thought they could’. The digital shift is already unravelling and re-knitting the practice of modern scholarship in myriad ways, some charted by Martin Weller in his key book. (3) But even he missed some elements – such as the rise of multi-author blogs (4) – and how quickly many ‘reputation’ problems in parts of the digital sphere may prove manageable as major universities get involved, a critical mass of expert reader/debaters is created, and new developments (like altmetrics) (5) occur.

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In the complex digital shift for books, four main developments are already in train or imminent. First, publishers like Oxford University Press are releasing some student-accessible intermediate texts and more overt textbooks in great formats. A university library subscribes to the ebook, and then students can freely access and download all the chapters in PDF form, save them and use them in just the same way as journal articles. Suddenly you can list these books on Moodle and your whole class or seminar group has instant access to all of the book – wiping out at a stroke the crippling disadvantages of paper books discussed in Part 1 of this blog. (6)

 

***********************************************

(1)

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/lsereviewofbooks/2012/04/29/paper-books-in-a-digital-era-how-conservative-publishers-and-authors-almost-killed-off-books-in-university-social-science/
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(2) http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/22/education/edlife/the-21st-century-education.html?pagewanted=all

 

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(3)

http://www.bloomsburyacademic.com/view/DigitalScholar_9781849666275/chapter-ba-9781849666275-chapter-001.xml

 

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(4)

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2012/02/24/five-minutes-patrick-dunleavy-chris-gilson/
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(5)
http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2011/11/21/altmetrics-twitter/
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(6)
http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/lsereviewofbooks/2012/04/29/paper-books-in-a-digital-era-how-conservative-publishers-and-authors-almost-killed-off-books-in-university-social-science

 

 

 

 

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Writer Unboxed » Why Are We Wired for Story?

Writer Unboxed » Why Are We Wired for Story? | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Lisa Cron#s book, Wired for Story: The Writer’s Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First Sentence ...

 

First, the mistaken belief: From time immemorial we’ve have been taught that things like lyrical language, insightful metaphors, vivid description, memorable characters, palpable sensory details and a fresh voice are what hooks readers.

It’s a seductive belief, because all those things are indisputably good. But they’re notwhat hook the reader. The brain, it turns out, is far less picky when it comes pretty prose than we’ve been led to believe.

What does the brain crave? Beginning with the very first sentence, the brain craves a sense of urgency that instantly makes us want to know what happens next. It’s a visceral feeling that seduces us into leaving the real world behind and surrendering to the world of the story.

Which brings us to the real question: Why? What are we really looking for in every story we read? What is that sense of urgency all about?

Thanks to recent advances in neuroscience, these are questions that we can now begin to answer with the kind clarity that sheds light on the genuine purpose of story, and elevates writers to the most powerful people on earth. Because story, as it turns out, has a much deeper and more meaningful purpose than simply to entertain and delight.

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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 23, 2013 8:39 AM

This dovetails with the Significant Objects book I read.

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Does Money Make Us Write Better? by Tim Parks | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books

Does Money Make Us Write Better? by Tim Parks | NYRblog | The New York Review of Books | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

I was writing, I think, in my early twenties, to prove to myself that I could write, that I could become part of the community of writers, and it seemed to me I could not myself be the final judge of that question. To prove I could write, that I could put together in words and interesting take on experience, I needed the confirmation of a publisher’s willingness to invest in me, and I needed readers, hopefully serious readers, and critics. For me, that is, a writer was not just someone who writes, but someone published, read and, yes, praised. Why I had set my heart on becoming that person remains unclear.

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Today, of course, aspiring writers go to creative writing schools and so already have feedback from professionals. Many of them will self-publish short stories on line and receive comments from unknown readers through the web. Yet I notice on the few occasions when I have taught creative writing courses that this encouragement, professional or otherwise, is never enough. Students are glad to hear you think they can write, but they need, as I did, the confirmation of a publishing contract, which involves money. Not that they’re calculating how much money, not at this point. They’re thinking of a token of recognition—they want to exist, as writers.

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The key idea here it seems to me is that of a community of reference. Writers can deal with a modest income if they feel they are writing toward a body of readers who are aware of their work and buy enough of it to keep the publisher happy. But the nature of contemporary globalization, with its tendency to unify markets for literature, is such that local literary communities are beginning to weaken, while the divide between those selling vast quantities of books worldwide and those selling very few and mainly on home territory is growing all the time.

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Italo Calvino’s 14 Definitions of What Makes a Classic

Italo Calvino’s 14 Definitions of What Makes a Classic | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

By Maria Popova

 

"...perhaps the most essential question is why the classics should be read. That’s exactly what beloved Italian writer Italo Calvino addresses in his 1991 book Why Read the Classics? (public library) — a sort of “classic” in its own right. In this collection of essays on classical literature, Calvino also produces these 14 definitions of a “classic”:


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Scholastic to Sell National Geographic Kids Books Through Storia | Digital Book World

Scholastic to Sell National Geographic Kids Books Through Storia | Digital Book World | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
PRESS RELEASE: Storia™, the eReading App for Kids Created by Scholastic, to Offer National Geographic for Kids Titles Non-fiction titles with spectacular...
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Available for free download on PC, iPad, iPhones and all iOS systems hardware (and this fall on Android tablets and smartphones), the Storia eReading app, is specially designed to captivate kids while helping them become better readers. Storia offers more than 2,000 titles for kids from toddlers through teens with more content being added daily.  Storia was recognized by Warren Buckleitner with the Editor’s Choice Award for children’s eBook apps in the May edition of Children’s Technology Review.

“Storia continues to earn praise from teachers, parents, kids and the media, and we are thrilled to add National Geographic for Kids titles to our growing list of outstanding eBook titles,” said Judy Newman, EVP, Scholastic and President, Scholastic Book Clubs and e-Commerce. “A widely recognized and trusted source of non-fiction for kids with amazing photography, award-winning authors and high interest content that kids love, National Geographic titles have long been popular in print through Scholastic Book Clubs and will be in great demand as teachers and students prepare for the new Common Core State Standards. Storia will bring these titles to vivid digital life, showcasing the beauty and exciting educational content of these amazing books.”
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Best Interactive Books For iPad: iPad/iPhone Apps AppList

Best Interactive Books For iPad: iPad/iPhone Apps AppList | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Gone are the days when planning and thinking were done mainly by pen and paper.Technology have made it pretty much easier to think in different other ways. Free mind mapping , brainstorming and concept mapping applications are ubiquitous online and more and more teachers are using them . The 21st century education is based , on a large part of it, on the visual output. Students, who due to their excessive use of and exposure to technology have become digitally focused, tend to show more  interaction and response towards these visual stimulae .

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Why Digital Writing Matters in Education | Edutopia

Why Digital Writing Matters in Education | Edutopia | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

By Jeff Grabill 

Summary by The Accomplished Teacher

 

"In this blog post, Jeff Grabill, a professor of rhetoric and professional writing, suggests ways in which digital-writing instruction can be improved. This writing often is collaborative, such as that found on platforms such as Wikipedia or Facebook, and there are various digital resources available to make writing easier, Grabill says. The fundamentals of writing instruction, however, remain the same, including the use of direct instruction and practice and revision, he writes."


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Essay Writing Wizard ™

Essay Writing Wizard ™ | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
We agree 100% that listening to music, playing games, and going out with friends are more fun than doing schoolwork.  No need to convince us.  And yes, the iPhone and iPod Touch are great digital companions.

But the truth of the matter is you still have to get your work done at some point.  And due dates seem to come up at the most inconvenient times.  Why not get work done when you can? 

Better yet, why not write that essay right the first time, and never worry again about having to do a rewrite?

Essay Writing Wizard is the solution for you!

For a very affordable price, each app has all the instructions to write a good, organized essay and no outside help is required.  Everything, from prewriting through the final revision, is covered in detail.

Available 24/7, it is your answer to writing effectively and efficiently.

Use the Essay Writing Wizard and you can get back to your games and friends a lot faster!  Plus, you will probably get a higher grade too!
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Having Undergraduates Write for Wikipedia - Association for Psychological Science

Having Undergraduates Write for Wikipedia - Association for Psychological Science | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

By Greta Munger

 

"When I read about the APS Wikipedia Initiative (APS WI) challenge to have students help correct Wikipedia, I thought it sounded like a really neat idea. To write a good Wikipedia article, the students need the same reading and research skills that my old assignment required with the advantage of contributing to the public good. Davidson College’s mission statement declares our intent “to assist students in developing humane instincts and disciplined and creative minds for lives of leadership and service,” a sentiment shared by many colleges. I believe that careful and rigorous study of any discipline can support this, but there can be quite a distance between the classroom and the service for some of us. The APSWI changes that because part of civic engagement is providing accurate information to forums that are accessible to a larger community."


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Speculations on the Future of the Book at MIT Conference

Speculations on the Future of the Book at MIT Conference | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it
Publishers Weekly ( @PublishersWkly ) correspondent Judith Rosen ( @Judith2dogs ) reports on the conference Unbound: Speculations on the Future of the Book ( #unbound ) held May 3-4 at MIT.
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Five minutes with Patrick Dunleavy and Chris Gilson: “Blogging is quite simply, one of the most important things that an academic should be doing right now”. | Impact of Social Sciences

Five minutes with Patrick Dunleavy and Chris Gilson: “Blogging is quite simply, one of the most important things that an academic should be doing right now”. | Impact of Social Sciences | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Ahead of the launch of EUROPP – an academic blog investigating matters of European politics and policy – next week, Patrick Dunleavy and Chris Gilson discuss social scientists’ obligation to spread their research to the wider world and how blogging can help academics break out of restrictive publishing loops.

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LSE’s Public Policy Group already run two academic blogs and you are preparing to launch two more in the coming months. Yet many academics are still sceptical about the value of blogging. What is it that gives you so much confidence in academic blogging as a means of dissemination and engagement?

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One of the recurring themes (from many different contributors) on the Impact of Social Science blog is that a new paradigm of research communications has grown up – one that de-emphasizes the traditional journals route, and re-prioritizes faster, real-time academic communication in which blogs play a critical intermediate role. They link to research reports and articles on the one hand, and they are linked to from Twitter, Facebook and Google+ news-streams and communities. So in research terms blogging is quite simply, one of the most important things that an academic should be doing right now.

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Paper books in a digital era: How conservative publishers and authors almost killed off books in university social science | LSE Review of Books

Paper books in a digital era: How conservative publishers and authors almost killed off books in university social science | LSE Review of Books | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Patrick Dunleavy

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Three years ago, drawing up my reading lists for the new academic year, I realized that I had almost stopped setting books altogether, in favour of journal articles. The reasons were simple. University reading lists are now generally held on some form of electronic ‘learning management system’ (LMS), such as Moodle (now claiming 58 million student users) or Blackboard. If I include journal articles on my Moodle reading list, students have instant one-click access to a free electronic copy (via LSE’s library). They can download PDFs, and keep them permanently in full text form beyond the seminar week, using the electronic article for later essay writing and revising for exams. In addition, the whole class can access and read the same materials simultaneously. And I can add journal articles right up to the last minute in digital on-demand form.

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Academics were also in digital denial in a big way, especially in the humanities and social sciences. Here books remained a core medium of scholarly communication. And often in these areas referencing practices have been so poor for so long that very many journal articles are not cited by anyone – especially in the humanities. Hence academics were mad keen to hang onto books, as the only things that got (lightly) cited.

http://chronicle.com/article/The-Research-Bust/129930/
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And of course academia and publishing are both full of book fetishists – people who genuinely love reading books, objectify them, love bookshops, love the heft and feel and smell of books, lap up articles about how anonymous little grey Kindles can never compete and so on. (Disclosure time – my house and my LSE study are both packed with thousands of the blighters too.) 

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The turning point

So this is where we stand today in the social sciences, at a very bad pass for books and even more for edited books and book chapters. But luckily the story does not end there, because many of the trends of the last two decades have now begun to change. We have in short reached a turning point, a moment in history when a renaissance of books’ influence can be foreseen across our disciplines. The key to this change is that books stop being only or even primarily paper products, and make the transition to ebooks and other digital forms. In addition, there are also many other newly favourable influences, such as the rise of the impacts agenda.

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Scooped by Heiko Idensen
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After the Elsevier boycott, scholarly e-presses are the way forward for academic publishing. | Impact of Social Sciences

After the Elsevier boycott, scholarly e-presses are the way forward for academic publishing. | Impact of Social Sciences | Social Reading & Writing: cultural techniques with social networks | Scoop.it

Offering an economical alternative to commercial publishing, e-presses can satisfy preferences for open access and print-on-demand. Agata Mrva-Montoya writes that academic e-presses are the best fit for the future of academic publishing.

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Undoubtedly, open access is one of the best tools used to ensure the broad dissemination of scholarship: SUP’s top-downloaded book Let sleeping dogs lie? (1) has had over 11,500 downloads since its release in October 2010. ANU e-press titles were downloaded over four million times in 2011.

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Many researchers, university administrators, librarians and governments believe that if the research has been funded by public money and carried out at a government-funded university, the results should be made available to the general public for free. In fact, many of research grant organisations make open access compulsory within a specific timeframe, for example the Scientific Council of the European Research Council (ERC), the US National Institutes of Health and the Australian Research Council (ARC). Earlier this year, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) released a statement supporting open access mandate. (2)


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(1)

http://purl.library.usyd.edu.au/sup/9781920899684
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(2)
http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/media/notices/2012/revised-policy-dissemination-research-findings

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