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Social Media, TIC y Salud
Herramientas, aplicaciones, redes.... para profesionales sanitarios y pacientes
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Diabete gourmand : application mobile pour l'alimentation des diabétiques

Diabete gourmand : application mobile pour l'alimentation des diabétiques | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it
Le laboratoire Bayer Diabetes Care met à disposition des patients diabétiques une nouvelle application mobile pour calculer les glucides et les valeurs nutritionnelles des repas : Diabète Gourmand....
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3 enjeux majeurs pour le Big Data dans l'internet des objets en 2015

3 enjeux majeurs pour le Big Data dans l'internet des objets en 2015 | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

Les objets connectés confrontent le Big Data à de nouveaux besoins, notamment le traitement rapide des multiples sources de données issues de l'Internet des objets.


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Crowdsourcing Study of 30,000 Images Connects Genes to Brain Size

Crowdsourcing Study of 30,000 Images Connects Genes to Brain Size | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

"A large network of neuroscientists and doctors that compared over 30,000 brain images with people’s DNA says it’s found several genes that appear to influence the size of brain structures involved in intelligence and memory, as well as the volume of the brain itself".

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Oncology Pocketcards app, a good concept with outdated content

Oncology Pocketcards app, a good concept with outdated content | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

Quick reference apps are great, but only when their content is up to date. The post Oncology Pocketcards app, a good concept with outdated content appeared first on iMedicalApps.


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Te Acompaña servicio para personas en situación de dependencia

Te Acompaña servicio para personas en situación de dependencia | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

Movistar presente Te Acompaña, un servicio pensado para facilitar la vida a millones de personas en situación de dependencia, temporal o permanente, así como sus familias dándoles tranquilidad, movilidad y confianza


Via Eva Tarín López, ChemaCepeda
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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, January 21, 11:22 AM

Las grandes tecnológicas continúan tomando posiciones en el sector de la eSalud. En este caso Movistar y su servicio de teleasistencia

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The Ultimate List of Social Media Acronyms and Abbreviations

The Ultimate List of Social Media Acronyms and Abbreviations | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

A complete glossary of social media acronyms and abbreviations - along with definitions - for social media updates and marketing.


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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, January 22, 3:05 PM

Interesante compilación de términos para conocer la jerga de Internet y Web 2.0. Esperando la versión en castellano

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Language on Twitter Tracks Rates of Coronary Heart Disease

Language on Twitter Tracks Rates of Coronary Heart Disease | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

Twitter can serve as a dashboard indicator of a community’s psychological well-being and can predict county-level rates of heart disease, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of theAssociation for Psychological Science.

 

Previous studies have identified many factors that contribute to the risk of heart disease, including behavioral factors like smoking and psychological factors like stress.

 

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania demonstrated that Twitter can capture more information about heart disease risk than many traditional factors combined, as it also characterizes the psychological atmosphere of a community.

 

The findings show that expressions of negative emotions such as anger, stress, and fatigue in the tweets from people in a given county were associated with higher heart disease risk in that county. On the other hand, expressions of positive emotions like excitement and optimism were associated with lower risk.

 

The results suggest that using Twitter as a window into a community’s collective mental state may provide a useful tool in epidemiology:

 more at http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/twitter-usage-can-predict-rates-of-coronary-heart-disease.html ;


Via nrip, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Iodine: buscador de información sobre medicamentos

Iodine: buscador de información sobre medicamentos | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

"Iodine es un nuevo buscador de información sobre medicamentos. Está en fase beta y ofrece, entre otras utilidades, opiniones y percepciones de los pacientes sobre los efectos secundarios y ..."

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The Surprising Role That Social Media Can Play In Healthcare

The Surprising Role That Social Media Can Play In Healthcare | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

For the vast majority of us -- more than 80 percent of folks in the United States -- social media is an integral part of our daily routine. We use it to stay up on current events, lovingly stalk family and friends, and share the latest viral video sensations. TV shows encourage us to tweet during the program, blogs want us to share the post with our networks and companies spend millions of dollars on campaigns -- like Coca Cola's Share a Coke campaign -- that use social media in exceptionally clever ways to drive us towards their products.

Long gone are the days of AOL chat rooms and Instant Messenger. Dominated by giants like Facebook, Twitter and Reddit, social media has grown to become a massive, sophisticated driving force in our culture. And with more than one quarter of the world's population using social media, we're now seeing organizations tapping that global digital connectivity to address some of the most urgent health crises of our time.

The vast majority of these pressing health issues -- like the global climate crisis for example -- are not easy to map out. They are driven by a complex web of social, political and financial factors and as a result, its is impossible to develop linear, one-size-fits-all solutions. What works with a particular population in one part of the world might not work elsewhere.

Social media opens new doors. It offers opportunities to build connections, share successes and explore opportunities that are difficult to map out in a linear world. Unfortunately the light-touch nature of the big social platforms can prevent the kind of interaction with an engaged audience that is needed to generate meaningful action.

To get around this, organizations are bypassing social media's big box stores, taking the concepts and technology that drive traditional social media to build new platforms that connects their audiences in new ways. The end result is not the number of likes or followers, but measurable impact on the health of individuals and communities worldwide.

Several health organizations have already launched tailored social platforms that target very specific audiences and are designed to identify and share context-specific solutions. Here are three notable examples:

A handful of smart, passionate students and young professionals saw there was no opportunity for them to participate in the global discourse on Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and health policy. NCDs are slowly evolving to be the next big public health catastrophe. So in 2009, they launched the Young Professionals Chronic Disease Network on a simple premise: create an online platform for idealistic, motivated young folks from multiple disciplines to come together and influence that global discourse. The platform has been a launchpad for careers and initiatives (such as NCDFREE), and is now recognized as the voice of young professionals in international health policy circles.

Ben and Jamie Heywood's founded the online patient portal, Patients Like Me after their brother passed away from ALS. With 300,000 members, Patients Like Me enables patients to share their experiences, compare symptoms and treatment, lend support to other patients, and track their health statistics. The platform also provides health organizations with access to specific patients, giving these organizations insight into how to best serve their patient communities.

In an effort to address the health and environmental harm brought on by climate change, Health Care Without Harm's Global Green and Healthy Hospitals initiative recently launched GGHH Connect. The multi-lingual digital community connects hospitals, health systems, and organizations worldwide to collaborate on sustainability efforts. Developed in partnership with Cisco and the Skoll Foundation, GGHH Connect enables hospitals to virtually meet, teach, and learn from others as they work toward their sustainability and environmental health goals.

These platforms are taking the core concepts that have made social media so successful and are creating innovative approaches to old problems. Rather than identifying the solution, they set out to find a solution by enabling their targeted audiences to explore new approaches, learn from one another, and adapt to meet the specific needs of their environment.

When we think about the daunting health crises we face, how do we begin to define the players, machinations and tectonic movements that produce the results we need? Our solutions cannot be one-size-fits-all, so the way we create those solutions must be equally diverse and tailored. How can we leverage these new social platforms to forge unique opportunities that bring the right people, resources and strategies into a conversation that will create new and needed solutions?

Health Care Without Harm is a partner of Cisco CSR. Cisco sponsors The Huffington Post's ImpactX section.

 


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GRANATUM: Social network for biomedical researchers

GRANATUM: Social network for biomedical researchers | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

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App que mide el riesgo de apendicitis

App que mide el riesgo de apendicitis | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it
Riesgo Apendicitis es una herramienta para ayudar a valorar a los pacientes con sospecha de apendicitis aguda.Esta aplicación se basa en cálculo del score de Alvarado. Durante más de 20 años este score ha constituido una importante herramienta para la valoración de pacientes con sospecha de apendicitis aguda, habiéndose demostrado su utilidad en numerosos artículos.
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5 Reasons Why Social Media is Good for Pre-Meds

5 Reasons Why Social Media is Good for Pre-Meds | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

After allowing The Biopsy public exposure and starting a Twitter account for it, I learned one important thing – I wish had done so sooner. The digital age of medicine is upon us and shaping a beneficial online presence is going to be one of the most critical activities a physician can undertake. Physicians, whether they like it or not, will have a de facto online presence due to doctor rating websites. As Dr. Vartabedian so aptly said, “Google is the new CV.”

So what can you, the budding premed, do to grapple with the ever-expanding digital domain? Instead of deleting your social media presence online in a mad rush to cover your tracks during the application season, you could use social media to your advantage. Danielle Jones, at Mind On Medicine, has covered this question in regards to residency interviews, but the concept is applicable to premeds as well. By cultivating a meaningful social media presence, you can impress medical schools and create another substantive activity on your résumé. Here are five reasons why I think every premed should have an online persona:

You learn new ideas fast

Ideas move at the speed of the Twitterverse, which may or may not be faster than the speed of light. Once you’ve connected with other people, your Twitterfeed gets flooded with good ideas, on which you can build new concepts, contrast existing ones, and reflect on your opinions.

Once I started my Twitter account and followed notable movers-and-shakers in the online medical sphere (@AAMCtoday, @drmikesevilla, @kevinmd, just to name a few), I kept receiving more tweets than I knew what to do with. By plugging into this network you’ll start hearing the rumbling of new concepts – concepts that could change medicine’s future – well before anyone else does.

It creates dialogue

Dialogue is part and parcel of an online media presence. If you want to be heard you need to speak up, in 140 characters that is. Twitter is teeming with users debating new ideas that may be applicable to you. Get in on that! Medicine is all about communication so it seems fitting that the internet be a medium of such communication. When you’re debating or agreeing with someone on Facebook Twitter, or your blog, you’ll be participating in valuable dialogue that’s beneficial for all parties.

It helps develop your bearings in medicine

What are you most interested in? Emergency medicine? Medical education? Health information technologies? Have no idea at all? Well that’s okay too. By monitoring Twitter debates, following other medical personas, or reading responses to your blog posts, you’ll get a better picture of what you’re interested in and what you may or may not have a semblance of expertise in. Why is that important? By honing in on what you’re curious about, you’ll develop a stronger sense of what your interests are. That will make your premed path much easier and more focused.

Let’s say Billy is a premed who likes primary care and computers. When he was 14, Billy built his own computer and coded his own applications. In college, Billy started an online persona and found himself contributing to debates in primary care and computers. Reading the responses in both arenas, he found himself drawn towards #HIT (Health Information Technology) more so than #FMRevolution (Family Medicine Revolution) tweets on Twitter. Because of this, Billy went on to develop meaningful opinions about electronic health records and even coded his own health-related mobile app. Billy now has something awesome to put on his medical school application.

Don’t worry if you don’t find your bearings quickly. I’ve been at it for a short while now and I’m still interested in everything! Sooner or later, though, I assume everyone will find their niche.

You’ll mature more quickly

Medical schools are highly concerned with recruiting mature individuals. Once you’ve amassed a modest following on the internet, you’re sure to find people who challenge your ideas. I was initially afraid of this, but it actually is a good thing. You’ll be forced to reflect on your ideas, sometimes even modify them, but don’t think of this as somehow reflecting poorly on you. We premeds are still young and our perspectives are still developing. By exposing your ideas to the public, you’ll be, in a sense, smelting them into stronger convictions indicative of maturation.

In response to the feedback you receive on your thoughts, you’ll become more wary of what you publish on the blogosphere or Twitterverse. Dr. Vertabedian posted an interesting piece on online physician image and its juxtaposition with the traditional clean-cut physician image. Online, we are who we fashion ourselves to be. Thus, if you’re interested in maintaining a professional online persona, you’ll start thinking more professionally. The posts you develop will be more thought out and nuanced. In medicine, physicians always have to be deliberate and cautious with the words they use. By developing a professional online persona, you’ll already have practice in that art, which puts you one step ahead of the competition.

You can easily contribute meaningfully

Unlike research, which takes months, if not years, to come up with valuable results, social media runs on instant gratification. You can contribute meaningfully through various platforms and have instant feedback on how you’re doing. During research conferences, where you need to be someone to be heard, all you need in Twitter is a handle to start sharing ideas. That’s your ticket to jumping in on dialogue and contributing your opinions to the masses. What other avenue is so easily accessible in medicine?

Of course, this is all assuming you’re not an inflammatory individual who tries to provoke incendiary comments. Rational and calm debate is the best way to get ideas across. Furthermore, it’s important that you maintain HIPAA compliance by changing names, genders, locations, or any other kind of identifying information. If you follow these rules, you’re golden.

 


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Cancéro Score : protocoles de chimiothérapie en Cancérologie sur mobile

Cancéro Score : protocoles de chimiothérapie en Cancérologie sur mobile | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it
La société Elsevier-Masson met à disposition des oncologues et hématologues une application mobile concernant les protocoles de chimiothérapie en cancérologie : Cancéro Score. Présentation. Pour ac...
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Rx Disruption: Technology Trends in Medicine and Health Care

Rx Disruption: Technology Trends in Medicine and Health Care | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

"Being a medical futurist means I work on bringing disruptive technologies to medicine and health care, assisting medical professionals and students in using these in an efficient and secure way, and educating patients about how to become equal partners with their caregivers, in both face-to-face and virtual relationships..."

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How Technology Will Eat Medicine

How Technology Will Eat Medicine | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

"The most significant announcement that Apple made in 2014 wasn’t a larger-sized iPhone. It was that Apple is entering the health-care industry. With HealthKit, it is building an iTunes-like platform for health; Apple Watch is its first medical device. Apple is, however, two steps behind Google, IBM, and hundreds of startups. They realized much earlier that medicine is becoming an information technology and that the trillion-dollar health-care market is ripe for disruption."


Via Tictrac, VAB Traductions, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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La santé à domicile de demain sera connectée | ...

La santé à domicile de demain sera connectée | ... | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

La Fédération des Prestataires de Santé à Domicile vient de sortir son rapport prospectif


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A healthcare case study of ASCO, Novartis and Boehringer conversation… cc #wydotpharma :-)

Conversation archetypes A healthcare case study of ASCO, Novartis and Boehringer

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Celine Sportisse, eMedToday
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Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, January 27, 8:58 AM

interesting case study on Twitter's activation by Asco, Novartis and BI. inspiring for SPMSD?

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Cuelgan en Internet para uso libre más de 100.000 imágenes de una exquisita colección inglesa - 20minutos.es

Cuelgan en Internet para uso libre más de 100.000 imágenes de una exquisita colección inglesa - 20minutos.es | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it
La Wellcome Collection de Londres abre en línea sus archivos, que contienen uno de los conjuntos de imágenes más ricos, variados y singulares del mundo. Hay desde obras de arte y fotos de época, hasta ilustraciones religiosas, láminas botánicas, fotos sociales y una gran selección de láminas médicas y anatómicas. Pueden bajarse en alta resolución y son de uso abierto mediante una licencia de Creative Commons que sólo impide el uso comercial.

Via Mariano Fernandez S.
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Miquel Loriz's curator insight, January 23, 3:16 AM

Material gráfico muy variado e interesante para blogs, webs y redes sociales. Clasificado por temas

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Vigipen : seringue connectée pour patients diabétiques

Vigipen : seringue connectée pour patients diabétiques | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it
La société suisse Vigilant a présenté lors du CES à Las Vegas début janvier une seringue connectée pour les diabétiques : Vigipen. Découverte. 

Dans notre société d’aujourd’hui, le nombre de diabétiques ne cesse d’augmenter..."

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Una app de ayuda en la comidas para diabéticos

Una app de ayuda en la comidas para diabéticos | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it
Meal Memory toma un nuevo enfoque para el seguimiento de la nutrición. Su objetivo era crear no sólo una aplicación de auto-seguimiento, sino también conseguir una mejor retroalimentación para los pacientes. Con este enfoque, ayuda a los pacientes con diabetes a entender las consecuencias que cada comida tiene en su azúcar en la sangre.
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Sure You Can Track Your Health Data, But Can Your Doctor Use It?

Sure You Can Track Your Health Data, But Can Your Doctor Use It? | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it
SOURCE JANUARY 19, 2015  Dr. Paul Abramson is no technophobe. He works at a hydraulic standing desk made in Denmark and his stethoscope boasts a data screen. "I'm an engineer and I'm in health care," he says. "I like gadgets." Still, the proliferation of gadgets that collect health data are giving him pause. Abramson is a primary care doctor in San Francisco and lots of his patients work in the tech industry. So it's not surprising that more and more of them are coming in with information collected from consumer medical devices — you know, those wristbands and phone apps that measure how much exercise you're getting or how many calories you're eating. The "wearables" market is growing fast. Credit Suisseestimates it's already worth between $3 billion and $5 billion. Add to that nearly 50,000 health apps, and you have a booming new digital health industry aiming to transform health care in the same way Amazon took on publishing. Abramson says all the information these devices collect
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Look At Me, the Interactive Camera App for Children with Autism

Millions of children struggles to make eye contact due to autism. There has been no scientifically-endorsed treatment. Till now. Introducing the world's first interactive camera app Look At Me, a program to improve eye contact and social skills. Jong-Hyun trained with Look At Me every day for eight weeks. And it's not only helped him to make eye contact more easily, but also brought him closer to his mom.

 


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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, January 20, 11:52 AM

Samsung lanza 'Look at me' la aplicación para mejorar el contacto visual y habilidades sociales en niños con autismo

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Presentación del informe ‘La Sociedad de la Información en España 2014′

Presentación del informe ‘La Sociedad de la Información en España 2014′ | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it
Fundación Telefónica canaliza la Acción Social y Cultural del Grupo Telefónica y está presente en Argentina, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, España, México, Perú y Venezuela. Aunque la actuación de la Fundación es local en todos y cada uno de estos paises, su enfoque es global, y si bien las Fundaciones han sido constituidas de acuerdo con las legislaciones respectivas de cada país, todas ellas comparten una misma visión, objetivos y métodos de trabajo

Via Francisco Revuelta, juandoming
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Social Media Use for Clinical Trial Recruitment

Social media can be an effective and easy way to connect with friends and professional contacts. However, it can also serve as a tool for institutions and principal investigators involved in enrolling subjects in clinical research to connect with prospective patients and subjects for clinical trial recruitment.

The research shows that, to-date, there has not been a significant amount of effective use of social media for the recruitment of patients and subjects for clinical trial research. Specifically, the Tufts Center for Drug Development at Tufts University reported on the use of social media in clinical trial research in June 2014 after conducting a nine-month study in 2013 (the “Study”). The Study results demonstrated that the majority of participating drug sponsors posted patient recruitment ads, but less than 1/3 interactively engaged in recruitment. While the Study only included pharma and biotech companies, it is reasonable to assume that device manufacturers and sponsors are also not effectively using social media to engage and recruit patients.

Given the enormous amount of time dedicated to patient recruitment for clinical trials, one would expect institutions to look beyond traditional recruitment methods, such as print, radio, and principal investigator relationships. The internet tends to be the first place that patients and caregivers go for medical information. Therefore, it should serve as a primary resource for information about clinical trials. Moreover, the benefits of recruiting online are numerous - lack of geographic constraints, the ability to access a larger patient population, obtain real-time adverse event reporting and improve feedback from patients, faster enrollment, minimize administrative burdens on sites, and cost savings.

Institutions and principal investigators, however, have not jumped on the internet bandwagon for promoting trials for a number of reasons.  One significant concern is the fear of navigating the legal regulatory landscape and not understanding the parameters of what is, and is not, appropriate. Fear of violating patient privacy and confidentiality is also of great concern.

The regulatory guidance on social media use in clinical trials is difficult to piece together, and it is not comprehensive or well organized. In fact, the regulatory guidance seemingly has been promulgated independently by several agencies, HHS/OIG, HHS’ Office for Human Research Protections and the FDA, and spans a period of about 12 years:

HHS OIG, Clinical Trial Websites, A Promising Tool to Foster Informed Consent (May 2002)OHRP Guidance on IRB Review of Clinical Trial Websites (September 2005)FDA Guidance for Industry, Fulfilling Regulatory Requirements for Postmarketing Submissions of Interactive Promotional Media for Prescription Human & Animal Drugs & Biologics, (Draft, January 2014)Recruiting Study Subjects – Info Sheet – Guidance for IRBs and Clinical Investigators (FDA website)FDA Guidance for Industry – Internet/Social Media Platforms with Character Limitations – Presenting Risk and Benefit Information for Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices (Draft, June 2014)FDA Guidance for Industry – Internet/Social Media Platforms: Correcting Independent Third-Party Misinformation about Drugs and Medical Devices (Draft, June 2014)FDA Guidance, Informed Consent Information Sheet – Guidance for IRBs, Clinical Investigators, and Sponsors (Draft, July 2014).

While some of the guidance is less informative than others, viewing all of it together provides a glimpse of the government’s perspective on the use of social media in clinical trials. The most significant take-away and recurring theme throughout the guidance is that the use of social media to recruit clinical trial participants may be part of the informed consent process. It should be noted that informed consent is mistakenly viewed as synonymous with a subject’s signature on the consent form. However, this is only part of consent process. Informed consent includes providing a potential subject with adequate information to allow for an informed decision about participation. Interestingly, while the government seems to suggest that social media can be an effective tool to recruit patients, it also warns about the use of Twitter and other platforms with character-space limitations.

While social media presents opportunities for clinical trial recruitment, the lack of cohesive regulatory guidance presents challenges. Institutions, clinical research organizations or principal investigators interested in exploring the use of social media to improve recruitment into clinical trials, should consult legal counsel in order to ensure that the social media initiative complies with law.

 

 


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Google pone más cerca el sueño de la traducción de conversaciones en tiempo real

Google pone más cerca el sueño de la traducción de conversaciones en tiempo real | Social Media, TIC y Salud | Scoop.it

"Google presenta las nuevas funciones para la app de Google Translate, que ahora traducirá dos idiomas en tiempo real ..."


Via Mariano Fernandez S.
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