HEALTHCARE & SOCIAL MEDIA
404.6K views | +30 today
Follow

How Using Social Media Could Minimize Adverse Effects From Medicine

From www.forbes.com

Adverse Drug Reactions (ADR) are the 4th leading cause of death in America. More people die from adverse effects from medicine than from pulmonary disease, diabetes, AIDS, pneumonia, accidents, and automobile deaths. People get sick or die because they mix the wrong combination of prescription drugs plus add over-the-counter remedies. According to the Federal Drug Administration, ADRs are the result of the increasing number of drugs that are available, the volume of drugs that are prescribed overall and multiple medications that are being prescribed to the same person.

What can you do today to protect you and your family from an Adverse Drug Reaction ? To find out, I spoke with both Dr. Kevin Campbell and Robert Baker. Dr. Campbell is an internationally recognized Cardiologist who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of heart rhythm disorders. Dr. Campbell is the Medical Expert for WNCN and appears weekly on the NBC17 morning news and also makes frequent appearances nationally on Fox News and CBS. Robert Baker has been a pharmacist in the New York/New Jersey area for over 25 years. Baker is the creator and founder of MyRxProfile, an app designed to provide information about the medicines people take so you can stay informed and safe, while on the go.

Belbey: Can social media be helpful in avoiding adverse drug reactions?

Dr. Cambpell: Absolutely. Find chat rooms, Twitter chats, Facebook support pages, and blogs about the patient experience. When you sort through all of that social media noise, you can find some real gems. You can find patients that say, “Hey, I ended up in the emergency room because I took Tylenol and DayQuil and I was really lucky. They were able to avert liver failure because I got there quickly.” It may bring to light some potential adverse events.

Belbey:  Liver failure? What are some example of adverse drug reactions?

Dr. Campbell: It varies. There might be mild adverse effects of lightheadedness or dizziness. Or people might feel poorly, fatigued, or maybe get a rash. There are also very severe adverse effects such as organ failure. That’s because sometimes medicines affect the way other medicines are metabolized. Let’s say you are taking a particular drug that is broken down and eliminated from the blood stream, in a predicable way, by the liver. Then you take an over-the-counter medicine or another prescription medicine that acts on the enzyme in the liver that breaks that first drug down and slows that enzyme’s activity down. What’s going to happen? You are going to accumulate the drug. When you have a higher level of a particular drug, you can see heart arrhythmias and you can see toxicity. That’s something the average person is not going to be aware of.

 

Belbey: How do “adverse effects” impact patients and the medical community?

Dr. Campbell: Patients are on tons of different medicines. You might see multiple physicians, maybe a general practitioner, one for your heart, one for your diabetes. All of a sudden, you are being treated with multiple medications. Some of them may be duplicative and medical records may not cross one another, so neither the doctors nor the patient knows. On top of this, you may grab over-the-counter remedies because they’re directly marketed to you and don’t require a prescription. You can buy them without speaking to a pharmacist. This results in the potential for an adverse negative event.

Belbey: What about over-the-counter drugs versus those that are prescribed?

Dr. Campbell: Let’s say that you’re taking Tylenol for arthritis or for other aches and pains, or just because it’s a regular medicine of yours. Then you get a cold and you start taking something like DayQuil or NyQuil. You may not realize it, but both those medicines have a ton of Tylenol in them. So you could be mistakenly overdose on Tylenol which can result in liver failure. And unless it’s treated immediately, it can lead to needing a liver transplant. Unintentional Tylenol overdoses are second only to alcoholism as a reason for a liver transplant. Unless you are a physician or a pharmacist, you’re not going to know about these risks

Adverse Drug Reactions (ADR) are the 4th leading cause of death in America. More people die from adverse effects from medicine than from pulmonary disease, diabetes, AIDS, pneumonia, accidents, and automobile deaths. People get sick or die because they mix the wrong combination of prescription drugs plus add over-the-counter remedies. According to the Federal Drug Administration, ADRs are the result of the increasing number of drugs that are available, the volume of drugs that are prescribed overall and multiple medications that are being prescribed to the same person.

What can you do today to protect you and your family from an Adverse Drug Reaction ? To find out, I spoke with both Dr. Kevin Campbell and Robert Baker. Dr. Campbell is an internationally recognized Cardiologist who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of heart rhythm disorders. Dr. Campbell is the Medical Expert for WNCN and appears weekly on the NBC17 morning news and also makes frequent appearances nationally on Fox News and CBS. Robert Baker has been a pharmacist in the New York/New Jersey area for over 25 years. Baker is the creator and founder of MyRxProfile, an app designed to provide information about the medicines people take so you can stay informed and safe, while on the go.

Belbey: Can social media be helpful in avoiding adverse drug reactions?

Dr. Cambpell: Absolutely. Find chat rooms, Twitter chats, Facebook support pages, and blogs about the patient experience. When you sort through all of that social media noise, you can find some real gems. You can find patients that say, “Hey, I ended up in the emergency room because I took Tylenol and DayQuil and I was really lucky. They were able to avert liver failure because I got there quickly.” It may bring to light some potential adverse events.

Belbey:  Liver failure? What are some example of adverse drug reactions?

Dr. Campbell: It varies. There might be mild adverse effects of lightheadedness or dizziness. Or people might feel poorly, fatigued, or maybe get a rash. There are also very severe adverse effects such as organ failure. That’s because sometimes medicines affect the way other medicines are metabolized. Let’s say you are taking a particular drug that is broken down and eliminated from the blood stream, in a predicable way, by the liver. Then you take an over-the-counter medicine or another prescription medicine that acts on the enzyme in the liver that breaks that first drug down and slows that enzyme’s activity down. What’s going to happen? You are going to accumulate the drug. When you have a higher level of a particular drug, you can see heart arrhythmias and you can see toxicity. That’s something the average person is not going to be aware of.

 

Belbey: How do “adverse effects” impact patients and the medical community?

Dr. Campbell: Patients are on tons of different medicines. You might see multiple physicians, maybe a general practitioner, one for your heart, one for your diabetes. All of a sudden, you are being treated with multiple medications. Some of them may be duplicative and medical records may not cross one another, so neither the doctors nor the patient knows. On top of this, you may grab over-the-counter remedies because they’re directly marketed to you and don’t require a prescription. You can buy them without speaking to a pharmacist. This results in the potential for an adverse negative event.

Belbey: What about over-the-counter drugs versus those that are prescribed?

Dr. Campbell: Let’s say that you’re taking Tylenol for arthritis or for other aches and pains, or just because it’s a regular medicine of yours. Then you get a cold and you start taking something like DayQuil or NyQuil. You may not realize it, but both those medicines have a ton of Tylenol in them. So you could be mistakenly overdose on Tylenol which can result in liver failure. And unless it’s treated immediately, it can lead to needing a liver transplant. Unintentional Tylenol overdoses are second only to alcoholism as a reason for a liver transplant. Unless you are a physician or a pharmacist, you’re not going to know about these risks.

No comment yet.

Can social media change health behavior?

From www.slideshare.net

Presentation at the 2017 joint annual convention of the Philippine Society of Hypertension & the Philippine Lipid & Atherosclerosis Society 23 Feb 2017 at Crow…
No comment yet.

Taking Tips from Social Media to Communicate with Patients

From www.pharmacytimes.com

If you have used Twitter, you know it limits each post to 140 characters. I’ve completed community and hospital rotations.  Regardless of the healthcare setting, just like each Twitter post, brevity is important. 
 
During a recent conversation with a patient over the phone, I found myself rambling on what could be summed up in several words. After I said what I needed to say, the patient told me to slow down and his English was not good.  That was when I reduced what I had just said to short phrases or sentences to get my message across. 
 
Even if the patient was fluent in English, putting myself in the patient’s shoes, the language of medicine is foreign.  Many patients who do not work in a health care setting do not have working knowledge of the brand and generic equivalent and indication. When patients pick up their medications for the first time, this is all new information and it will take some time for the patient to process the information. After going over the medications with the patient, to ensure the patient get the takeaway message, I highlight just the major points for each medication in a few words. 
 
What I learned from Twitter is saying enough in a limited number of characters. Saying too little can be an issue. For example, the pharmacy informs the physician's office that the insurance does not cover the patient’s medication. The doctor now needs to contact the pharmacy to find out what are the options. The wasted time could be prevented if the pharmacy prepared with a couple of options such as completing a prior authorization or switching to an alternative medication.
 
Whether I am talking to a patient or health care professional over the phone, in person, or in writing, I learned that I need to keep what I need to say short. Time is precious. I don’t want to waste another person’s time by saying what’s irrelevant or not understood. However, time is also wasted if the message is too short. It is important to provide enough information to resolve the situation.

No comment yet.

Why Do Healthcare Professionals Find Social Media Useful?

From www.twitchtime.com

rob halkes's curator insight, June 10, 2016 7:08 AM

Nice Overview: WHy do healthcare professionals find social media useful!

Art Jones's curator insight, March 13, 4:02 PM

60% of doctors say social media improves the quality of care delivered to patients. (source: Demi & Cooper Advertising and DC Interactive Group) . How are you using social media?

Social Media & Health: Safety Concerns

From www.slideshare.net

Presentation at the 2017 joint annual convention of the Philippine Society of Hypertension & Philippine Lipid & Atherosclerosis Society 25 Feb 2017, Crowne Pla…
No comment yet.

Social Media & Healthcare

From www.slideshare.net

Presentation at the 19th anniversary conference of the National Institutes of Health (UP Manila). 2 March 2017 Bayanihan Center, Pasig City. It discusses this…
No comment yet.

Health Dialogue in the Social Media

From copenhagenhealthinnovation.dk

Big data analysis of social media will give health professionals new tools for efficiently disseminating health information.

How can the healthcare system make sure that important health- and disease-related information in fact reaches the relevant citizens and is not lost in the great amount of information produced by the modern society? Copenhagen Health Innovation aims to answer this question by analysing how health information is communicated via the social media and how it affects citizens and patients.

By comparing data from health organisations’ Facebook and Twitter pages, e.g. media (text, photo or video), sender (official, employee or patient) and time, with the reactions of citizens, it is possible to develop a model for efficiently disseminating health information via the social media.

  • Dialogue can change behaviour

    The aim is to facilitate as much interaction as possible with the relevant citizens through dialogue on health issues. Encouraging citizens to change their behaviour is easier through dialogue, e.g. by giving them concrete tools for changing their eating habits.

     
  • Identifying patients at an earlier stage

    Using text analysis, the model will also try to determine whether the social media can be used to get into contact with citizens who show early signs of a disease.

     
  • Training of health professionals

    Based on the model for health dialogue, new programmes will be developed for training health professionals to use the social media to create effective dialogue.

No comment yet.

Doctors should get social, but know the legal hurdles

From www.healthcarefinancenews.com

Today's patients, like our current president, are immersed in social media, so it only makes sense that healthcare organizations should get on board too. But before you do, there are unique compliance hurdles that should be understood.

That was the message sent at HIMSS17 by cardiologist and Fox News contributor Kevin Campbell, MD, and Michael Rutty, a legal subject matter expert from communications archiving company Actiance.

"Physicians have been very slow to adopt social because they're scared of attorneys," said Rutty. And perhaps that's with good reason.

According to Rutty, there has been a host of new legal precedents surrounding HIPAA that have held social messaging to the same standards of other healthcare communications. Those include rulings that held social media posts as admissible in court and forbid removing posts and pages, just like other correspondence that providers are required to archive under the law.

Still, that should not discourage adoption, they said.

[Also: Addressing patients' social needs could help reduce costs, ER usage, finds Commonwealth]

"You can do social media in a smart, engaging and successful way that has a real impact," said Campbell. The presenters said there are a few key ways physicians can use social media safely and effectively.

For starters, it can be an effective way to treat patients with recommendations, as long as it is never used to engage in a conversation leveraging the doctor-patient relationship. Speak to the broader audience instead. For example, there are often disease-specific support groups on Twitter that you can participate in.

On the other hand, social media is a perfect platform for timely and credible information to the patient population. The presenters said 75 percent of patients have done some kind of online research before their visits. Here is a chance to make sure they aren't armed with "fake news."

Social media is also a great way to clearly highlight a physician's expertise ―and even availability. The duo said tools like blogs can be a great way to demonstrate your skill set.

"Social media is where our patients, customers and colleagues are, so it is where we need to be in order to best meet their needs," said Campbell.

No comment yet.

Twitter Is Trending in Academic Medicine

From news.aamc.org

Twitter has changed how he works, said Jason Frank, MD (@drjfrank), a clinician-educator at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (@RoyalCollege). Frank is among a number of health professionals who are using this social media platform to share their scholarship, engage with the public, build new social networks, and advocate for change.

Twitter offers a means for educators, clinicians, and researchers to communicate and stay connected with each other in real time through brief 140-character messages. Instead of waiting to discuss new research in-person with a handful of colleagues or at a conference, academic medicine professionals can reach more people in more places through social media. “Within the next decade, you won’t be able to be a successful scholar without having some activity on social media,” Frank predicted.  

Social Networking Use Shot Up in the Past DecadePercentage of all American adults and internet-using adults who use at least one social networking site.
Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2005-2006, 2008-2015. No data are available for 2007.
Advancing scholarship one tweet at a time

Stressing the impact of Twitter, Frank said he relies on #meded as one of his primary sources of information about new education research and to build a community of practice. By searching the social media network for this hashtag, he is quickly able to find other colleagues who are tweeting about medical education. For example, Frank might share a tweet (known as retweeting, or RT for short) about a new medical school curriculum and add context by commenting on how that information applies to his own work. Then another educator, someone outside North America perhaps, might read Frank’s tweet, which she found through a #meded search of her own, and add a comment about a course she introduced at her school. Now, a conversation has started about this new curriculum that stretches across the globe.

“Within the next decade, you won’t be able to be a successful scholar without having some activity on social media.”

Jason Frank, MD
Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada

These conversations benefit not only the participants, as they learn from each other, but also their followers, who are able to monitor and take part as the conversation unfolds. Twitter is “a way to connect with scholars all around the world who you wouldn’t ordinarily be able to connect with,” said Lauren Maggio, MS , MA, PhD (@LaurenMaggio), associate director of distributed learning and technology in the Department of Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (@USUHSPAO).

 

Expanding Your Network, On and Offline

Want to learn more about leveraging social media to benefit your work and institution? Attend the 2017 AAMC National Professional Development Conference for Institutional Advancement, March 29 to April 1 in Puerto Rico.

Sponsored by the AAMC Group on Institutional Advancement (GIA), the conference will include six sessions on establishing a social media presence in academic medicine. Among them:

Cultivating Content for Riding the Right Social Media TrendsPower Panel: What’s on Your Dashboard?Demystifying and Leveraging Media Metrics to Showcase Your Productivity and Impact

This annual conference is geared towards supporting academic medicine professionals in alumni relations, communications, development, marketing and public affairs/community relations. Participants will hear from a compelling roster of speakers and have the opportunity to expand their professional networks, learn new skills, and share effective strategies for advancing their institutions.

Register

In addition to learning about others’ research on Twitter, both Frank and Maggio said they use the platform to share their own research with other scholars to increase the influence of their work.

Reaching a broader audience

Another reason to start tweeting? According to the Pew Research Center (@pewresearch), social media use is ubiquitous across genders, races, and nearly every other demographic comparison. Potentially, you can reach 313 million adults worldwide who have Twitter accounts. Using Twitter, physicians can reach outside academic medicine to patients and the public, two groups that have traditionally been hard to engage.

Wendy Sue Swanson, MD, MBE (@seattlemamadoc), a pediatrician and the chief of digital innovation at Seattle Children’s Hospital (@seattlechildren), said that social media allows her to amplify her voice and reach a wider audience in a short amount of time.

After talking in the exam room with parent after parent about the value of vaccinating their children, Swanson realized that she could reach more parents by blogging and tweeting about vaccine science and safety than she could counseling one person at a time in the exam room. While others were using social media to spread untruths that were changing the face of vaccine science, Swanson used her Seattle Mama Doc blog and @seattlemamadoc Twitter handle to present the facts from experts in the field.

Without social media, Swanson estimates she could reach about 25 patients a day in the clinic and 10 more in care coordination. With social media, though, she can connect with millions with campaigns such as the 2015 #MeaslesTruth TwitterStormthat reached 20 million people in 10 minutes.

Although interactions like these on Twitter may not be as intimate as those in the exam room, they are helping families to understand science. “I don’t know how to practice without these tools anymore,” said Swanson.

Creating new social networks

 

The AAMC Embraces Social Media

The AAMC pioneered academic medicine’s use of social media in 2005 with its Aspiring Docs campaign. Today, the AAMC has 20 active Twitter handles totaling over 146 thousand followers, six Facebook pages, and accounts on platforms including YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and WordPress.  These platforms reach members, constituents, policymakers, medical school applicants and students, media, and the public.

“The fact that so many of our member medical schools and teaching hospitals are now on Twitter is incredibly exciting. It has opened up a new world of possibilities for connecting, sharing information, and highlighting innovations in medical education, patient care, and research across the nation,” said Stephanie Weiner, AAMC Senior Social Media Strategist.

Twitter has been an invaluable tool for AAMC advocacy activities, Weiner added, noting the successful campaigns: #SaveStudentAid, the American Doctor Shortage, and AAMC’s growing grassroots community, AAMCAction. With close to 185,000 community members, AAMCAction spurred close to 42,000 advocacy actions during 2016, including tweets to key Congressional members and expressions of support through online petitions.

“Although we don’t expect overnight success on all our channels, by building our online communities and taking calculated risks, we can help inspire our audiences to get engaged and make a difference,” Weiner said.

List of AAMC Twitter Contacts

As a way to process grief, Sarah Bernstein, MD (@sbernsteinmd), a pediatric resident at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago (@uiccom), wrote about the first patient she lost. More than 170 people tweeted about her essay published in the journal Academic Medicine. Through these tweets, Bernstein connected with other physicians and nurses who had similar experiences, as well as with families who lost children or had babies in a neonatal intensive-care unit. From her story, these families told her, they learned “how much heart had gone into caring for their children.” Bridging the gap between families and physicians in this way wouldn’t have been possible without Twitter.
 

Using Twitter is an easier and less invasive way to reach out to a stranger than speaking in person or sending an email, said Bernstein. In this case, Twitter not only encouraged these connections, but also served as an avenue for comfort and healing for both families and a physician alike.

Enacting change

Twitter also allows physicians to take action. On Sept. 30, 2015, the McGill Qualitative Health Research Group (@MQHRG) tweeted an excerpt of a rejection letter their scholars received from the journal BMJ (@bmj_latest). The rejection stated that “qualitative studies are an extremely low priority [for BMJ].” That same day, scholars from around the world used Twitter to express their outrage. They organized to submit an open letter in response to the decision. Hundreds of tweets were sent in the first few days using #BMJnoqual. Three weeks later, 76 researchers from 11 countries had signed the letter, which argued for the value of qualitative research.

In February 2016, BMJ published the letter. More than 1,600 people have since sent upward of 2,200 tweets about it, triggering BMJ editors to respond with their own open letter and a formal call for articles about qualitative research.

“If you’re in health care, social media is a critical element,” said Frank. For those not already on Twitter, communication departments of most academic medical centers will be able to provide guidance and share policies about how to engage in social media in a responsible, ethical manner.

Katie Swanson Sathre's curator insight, March 5, 11:22 AM

Twitter is trending as a professional development tool in academic medicine.

Healthcare's new challenge: online reputation management

From www.cio.com

No topic gets more attention today in healthcare than patient experience (PX). Whether in the context of population health management, value-based care or healthcare consumerism, improving PX is the dominant driver for technology investments and innovation programs.

Healthcare consumers are not just taking charge of their healthcare decisions; they are weighing in on everything from price transparency and care quality to the demeanor and friendliness of their care providers, and they are expressing themselves on social media.

Patient experience and online reputations

A recent survey by consulting firm Jarrard Inc., titled Patient Experience 2.0, provides some insights into the challenges faced by health systems in understanding healthcare consumers.

  • Until now, the healthcare industry has focused exclusively on HCAHPS scores to manage their organizational reputations. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) uses HCAHPS scores to determine patient satisfaction levels, which in turn drives financial incentives for health systems. However, according to the Jarrard survey, HCAHPS is far from adequate in capturing the overall patient experience today.
  • After long years of insulation from the brutal forces of a competitive consumer-oriented marketplace, healthcare is now scrambling to catch up. Healthcare companies are turning to other consumer industries such as retail and banking for best practices in engaging consumers across multiple channels.

The rise of social media has created a new problem (and an opportunity) for healthcare providers: how to manage their online reputations.

Most health systems do not have an effective means to capture patient feedback from social media and integrate that data into a multichannel strategy for PX management. As consumer preferences change and choices increase, health systems also have to actively market themselves to acquire and retain customers. (Read my earlier column here on how Lehigh Valley Health Network’s CIO and CMO work closely to use technology and data to shape their digital marketing strategy.)

Health systems are recognizing all this and are going beyond traditional engagement models to become partners with their consumers in managing health and wellness.  

If you build it, they will no longer just keep coming

Providence Health & Services (Providence Health), a large health system founded in 1859 that serves over 11 million patients in seven states across the western United States, is looking at online reputation management as an important aspect of patient experience and a key to the long-term sustainability of the business. In a departure from the traditional “if you build it, they will come” approach to patient acquisition and retention, Providence Health is looking at customer lifetime value (CLV) and focusing on building long-term relationships with patients instead of just focusing on high-margin surgeries.

Customer satisfaction and retention follow a tried and tested three-part formula: data, insights and action. But what if the data is woefully inadequate and fails to take into consideration the different forms and sources from which it is available today?

A part of the problem with HCAHPS — besides getting patients to respond to surveys — is that patient feedback is no longer limited to a single encounter or to a single platform. Patients today are letting loose on social media all the time regarding all aspects of their experience. And their doctors are not their Facebook friends. So how does the healthcare provider obtain meaningful feedback and insights to drive changes?

Providence Health, like the respondents in the Jarrard survey, knew that it needed something more than HCAHPS scores to understand the true nature of patient experience in its hospitals. Working with Binary Fountain, a company that has developed a partnership with Press Ganey, Providence Health deployed Binary Health Analytics, a holistic patient feedback management platform to manage online reputation and improve patient experience. The platform helps healthcare organizations uncover and act on patient experience insights from online ratings and reviews, social media, CG-CAHPS and HCAHPS and other surveys. By augmenting proprietary patient survey data (Press Ganey) with crowdsourced reviews (e.g. Yelp), Providence Health is able to enhance its understanding of patient experience to drive operational change.

Since the publication of these ratings, providers in the Providence network who are part of the program have seen a 25% to 29% surge in page views. Patients have indicated the reviews to be valuable considerations in provider selection. That's not surprising, since 65% of the respondents in the Jarrard survey indicated they do not provide any patient reviews at all on their websites. It’s as if patients have finally found a voice, and health systems like Providence Health have tapped into a crying need in the healthcare marketplace.

Show me the money

However, it’s early days yet. Harnessing all the available data on patients in real time is a challenge, even as data sources continue to explode, from data collected via the internet of things (IoT) to patient-generated health data (PGHD). The scoring algorithms will need to develop predictive abilities that can anticipate and address patient experience issues before they become customer retention problems for the health system.

The most valuable digital businesses today, such as Amazon, use a combination of technology, data and network relationships to create value. They use advanced algorithms to predict what consumers might be interested in, and proactively make suggestions to them. Healthcare, mired under regulations and lack of transparency, is getting a wake-up call as enlightened consumers start to demand experiences similar to those they have with online retailers and other ecommerce businesses. Emerging digital health businesses are the antithesis of brick-and-mortar health systems, and they focus intensely on user experience and convenience, transparency and choice as the foundations of their business models.

Someday soon, consumers — especially millennials — may buy healthcare just as they buy any other service, such as banking or insurance. The three-part formula for business success in the new era may well be: reputation, retention and revenue. For health systems, it may start with their online reputations.

This article is published as part of the IDG Contributor Network.

No comment yet.

Socially vigilant: Does pharmacovigilance need secondary data & social media? 

From www.pharmafile.com

s the world’s drug consumption continues to rise alongside advancements in the medical and pharmaceutical industries, so too do new challenges. And as technology also evolves, new solutions are coming into focus. But they are not without their own challenges, as Matt Fellows discovers.

“Events of the last decade, including more thorough safety documentation and reviews for drug approvals, and increased warnings and awareness about adverse drug reactions, have made drug safety one of the top issues for consumers and regulators,” Dr Olga Carroll explains in her essay Global Pharmacovigilance: Requirements and Trends – the Global Regulatory Perspective. The market for pharmacovigilance was estimated to be worth more than $3 billion in 2015 and analysts project that will more than double to $8 billion by 2024; In 2010 in the US alone, over 6.4 billion drugs were dispensed to patients, and with the rising incidence of specific illness such as cardiovascular, respiratory and oncology-related diseases, in addition to concerns such as ageing populations, the global burden is growing and with it grows demand.

With an unprecedented quantity and range of treatments on the market, potential safety risks are a major concern; never before has pharmacovigilance been so crucial, and it will only continue to become more important as time goes on.

But as the world changes rapidly, current processes across the industry increasingly run the risk of becoming out of step and underperforming. There is a necessity and moral obligation for pharmacovigilance services to deliver not only the highest standards, but also to function in a manner which is fit for purpose in a climate that is ever-shifting.

A new standard

 

This highlights the need to regularly scrutinise ongoing processes of pharmacovigilance, and indeed all systems surrounding the life sciences and healthcare sectors. And this is just what the European Medicines Agency (EMA) did in 2012, with the launch of new legislation which was, as the EMA describes, “the biggest change to the regulation of human medicines in the European Union (EU) since 1995.” The legislation was introduced based on findings which suggested adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were responsible for 197,000 deaths a year in the EU. Based on reports, it is estimated that ADRs stand as the fifth-highest cause of death in hospitals, accounting for 5% of admissions.

ADRs are not a threat to be underestimated, and the aforementioned statistics only reinforce the necessity of robust pharmacovigilance measures. With this in mind, the EMA’s new legislation called for higher and more consistent standards across the member states of Europe concerning the issues of data collection, regulatory action and transparency levels, all delivered in a timely manner with a view to, primarily, reduce the overall number of ADRs.

Pharmafocus spoke to Mick Foy, group manager, Vigilance, Intelligence & Research Group at the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), who was quick to stress the importance of this new legislation early in the conversation, noting that a lack of required guidelines across EU states had led to patchy and inconsistent level of pharmacovigilance efficacy across the continent.

“The European Commission recognised that the member states of Europe were operating at different levels of maturity,” he explains, “so there were a lot of new requirements on us all, such as the broadened scope of what is an adverse drug reaction; the need to operate quality management systems; the different assessment procedures that were brought into play with those new regulations.

“Some countries were more advanced in their ability to operate those new requirements, so we set about a project that looked to identify what practice looked like in a number of these areas, and then turned that into guidance and training material for the member states so we can all raise the bar, if you like, and operate those new requirements. So what that’s shown us is that there’s really differing practice across Europe and what some countries were able to implement was easier than others, so we’ve been learning off of each other.”

The EMA evaluated the effects of the legislation after one full year of application together with representative medicines regulatory authorities in the member states. It discovered, among other findings, that patient reports of suspected adverse drug reactions had risen by more than 9,000 on the previous year, and thousands more staff were adequately trained in pharmacovigilance.


Mick Foy, group manager, Vigilance, Intelligence & Research Group at the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA)

Foy looks back on the introduction of the legislation as a significant step forward in creating a shared and applied vision of best pharmacovigilance practice:

“I think it’s been successful in a number of areas, not least the more systematic review of emerging signals through the PRAC (Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee). What we see now is a lot more being dealt with in a timely manner; the process is much better organised for identifying and discussing and agreeing a course of action for the safety issues. Prior to this new system being in place, the timescales were not set down; the process was variable, and I think there’s a much more systematic approach to handling safety issues now. And then beyond that, the communications and the transparency over what’s being discussed and how it’s being handled is much more obvious. So there’s full disclosure and transparency that maybe wasn’t in place prior to that. So I think that’s been a major step forward.

“At a more local level, I think what the legislation has done has engaged much better and fuller with stakeholders,” he continues, “so the introduction of patient reporting across the whole of Europe I think is a major step forward for the inclusion of people who actually take the medicines that we are looking at to understand if there are any safety issues. The wording of the legislation is that we must “take all appropriate measures to encourage the reporting of adverse drug reactions with patients and healthcare professionals”. I think that’s been a bit of a call to arms if you like at a national level to say you must reach out to your stakeholders, tell them about the existence of your systems and encourage them to send you reports of suspected adverse drug reactions.”

However, despite this new legislation, the demands of pharmacovigilance have continued to evolve as drug consumption has continued to rise; while these measures do indeed ‘raise the bar’ for pharmacovigilance practices in a much-needed and welcomed fashion, as time passes it becomes increasingly evident that there are still shortfalls in the system which could require a different approach to adequately address. Traditional methods of ADR reporting, such as paper-based reports, are often inconvenient, slow and inefficient. It is a pervading professional opinion that there is a necessity to explore and utilise new avenues of data collection to improve the efficacy of the field, as Itzik Lichtenfeld, CEO of intelligence firm Data2Life outlines in his essay The Past, Present and Future of Pharmacovigilance:

“Today, the industry finds itself in the very early stages of a long-term journey toward a more data-driven and analytic-enabled approach to PV, post-marketing surveillance and drug safety management as a whole,” he says. “The same data and signal detection capabilities can transform innovation and product development, clinical trial design, medical affairs and risk management.

“In practical terms, regulators’ attitudes toward secondary data cannot be overlooked. That one of the world’s biggest and most visible regulatory bodies views secondary data as a valid input to policy making decisions demonstrates its long-term importance in the drug safety realm. Per the FDA’s Sentinel Initiative, EMA’s WEB-RADR program and the SAFER project which is funded by the European commission research executive agency, the PV community is beginning to recognize that social media is not just for marketing anymore. As such, there is reason to believe that today’s scepticism will slowly become tomorrow’s advocacy.”

Using initiative

As mentioned, the industry is moving always closer to engaging with this new avenues; of particular note among these is the EMA’s aforementioned WEB-RADR project. Launched in September 2014, WEB-RADR is an ongoing effort funded by the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) which seeks to utilise the power of social media and other technologies for ADR-reporting purposes, as well as to establish guidelines and regulatory framework on the use of the technology for such reporting. The project’s ultimate goal is to deliver a mobile app which can be used by patients and healthcare professionals as a new method for reporting ADR, one that is convenient, quick and efficient in a way that conventional tools are not.

Foy discussed the significance of the project: “[The IMI] put a call out to understand how social media might help pharmacovigilance. It’s been running now for two and a half years; it finishes in September of this year, it’s a three-year project. It’s been looking at two areas: one is the use of social media and the other half has been looking at the use of mobile technologies to help with reporting cases.

“On the social media side, the reason why this was interesting and warranted research was that there was a growing access to social media data by regulators and the pharma industry. I think it was primarily being looked at by marketing departments to see what people were saying about their medicines and how they might use that data to understand benefits. There was a pharmacovigilance concern there, because if people are talking about their medicines, they could be talking about harms that they’ve experienced, or there might be quality issues or suspected counterfeiting issues, or how people are misusing and abusing their medicines, so pharmacovigilance systems became concerned that if people are accessing this secondary data, they have certain responsibilities there. So good vigilance practice stipulated that if they are in the social media space and they uncover cases of suspected adverse drug reaction and they met the validity criteria for a case, then that needed to be reported.”

According to Foy, the project has been very much a learning experience as the industry ventures into this new medium to assess to what extent it could be useful in the generation of relevant data.

“This was very early days and there was concern that this could generate huge volumes of poor quality, low-value reports, so we started this project to really understand how to best access social media data, how best to analyse it and interpret it,” he continued. “We’ve come a long way since the beginning of the project and we’ve looked at a huge volume of social media data: Facebook, Twitter, forums, Reddit and other forms of social media. The analysis is still underway; data tells you different things depending on what you’re looking at, so there are drugs that are better represented in social media data than others; there are types of use and types of ADR that are more discussed than others.  I think at this stage what we’re seeing is not a single best use of social media; there are areas where it might be beneficial and areas where there is an absence of quality data.

“The research findings are not final, but there is a lot of information on how certain products are misused for illicit purposes to get a ‘high’,” he continues. “So people are talking about how to break down their medicines to very creative uses. What that means for pharmacovigilance, we don’t really know yet because it’s not really validating a safety signal, but there are areas that companies and regulators need to be aware of how people might be using products in an unintended way; it’s good to get that understanding.”

A challenging nature

 

The immediate and universal finding when exploring the functionality of secondary data, particularly social media, for pharmacovigilance uses is that applying the technology in a manner so much in its relative infancy is the challenges it presents. WEB-RADR has run into plenty of obstacles in its almost-three year history, and the fleeting, mercurial nature of social media is foremost among them, as Foy explains:

“The social media environment is very changeable and new social media platforms come on stream quite quickly while others disappear; the predominant data at the beginning of this project was Facebook data – it had a lot more quality to it because when you compare it to Twitter – with its limited character set, you got fuller stories form Facebook posts. However, Facebook changed our access policy, so we no longer have an ongoing access to Facebook data. So we brought in Reddit, and that’s a different community again. So I think where we’re heading with this is not to say “this is how you should use social media data, as a rule”; it’s likely that we will be giving case studies on where it’s been beneficial, where it hasn’t been beneficial, the sorts of areas where it might be put to good use. I think the GDP may well change in light of the findings from the research, but we haven’t come to any conclusions as yet.”

Beyond their fast-moving nature, another trait makes social media platforms difficult to bend to pharmacovigilance utility: namely, the fact that they function as a social media platform in the first place, and not a specialised medical tool.

As Foy states, the platforms can be a great source of information, but this is often dependent upon user input and there is still a propensity for “an absence of high-quality data”. A possible solution would be the use of computer algorithms and tools to trawl the huge amounts of data available, but the platforms’ very nature often makes it very difficult to harvest data from them in efficient, automated ways, as outlined by Richard Sloane, Orod Osanlou,, David Lewis, Danushka Bollegala, Simon Maskell and Munir Pirmohamed in their essay Social media and pharmacovigilance: A review of the opportunities and challenges:

“Current technological challenges include the difficulty for algorithms to interpret layperson technology. Inter-annotator disagreement during the annotation process on interpreting ADRs in social media makes it extremely challenging, if not impossible, for algorithms to interpret postings with certainty.”

As the use of social media in pharmacovigilance practices continues to evolve, this will be a consistent challenge that will need to be solved to properly unlock its full usefulness.

Where the ultimate goal of pharmacovigilance is to keep patients safe from ADRs to the best possible degree, it can be argued that the use of social media as a tool in this regard becomes a necessity. Sloane, Osanlou, Lewis, Bollegala, Maskell and Pirmohamed echo this sentiment, but again, it proves to be a complex issue:

“It could be argued that there is an ethical obligation to attempt to harvest social media data in order to enhance pharmacovigilance and ultimately improve patient safety. However, this raises important and controversial ethical issues. The boundaries of what constitutes public and private data are not comprehensively defined.”

Thus, there is a fine line to be walked in application of the technology; as the essay states: “The balance of privacy, duty of care and the greater good is complex.”

But do we need it?

 

But with all these apparent complications, is the payoff worth it? While it definitely has its place in the pharmacovigilance system, Foy is not entirely convinced of its necessity, particularly when compared to other, more directly applicable secondary data sources such as electronic medical records, but the need for it to be held up to regulatory scrutiny is still a priority:

“I wouldn’t say at this stage that we ‘need’ [social media] for pharmacovigilance purposes. I think people are using it, and if you’re going to use it, you need a good set of policy guidelines on where it’s useful and where it might not be useful, and some of the pitfalls when you get involved in this space. There is no requirement to use social media data. I don’t see as yet that it is a significant tool in the pharmacovigilance armoury; I don’t think social media is replacing spontaneous reporting and the Yellow Card scheme. It’s certainly not replacing things like CPRD (Clinical Practice Research Datalink), electronic healthcare records which have a trusted, high-quality and longitudinal history to them. Proper scientific evaluation of drug safety signals, I think there are good tools in place for that. But social media is still a new tool and a new possibility, and it’s probably maturing all the time, but saying that, it’s changing all the time as well. I think it might have a place to help understand some real-world use and what real users are saying, but I don’t think it’s at the stage where we can say it’s an authoritative resource for pharmacovigilance.” 

It appears industry professionals are still somewhat divided. Lichtenfeld argues that when it comes to wider secondary data, including social media, it is important to stress that it is complementary to standard practice:

“There is lingering skepticism among industry veterans regarding secondary data. Some consider secondary data inferior to the primary research data that has been the gold standard of the industry for decades. But secondary data is not meant to replace primary research data. Nor is it meant to replace skilled and experienced researchers. Rather, secondary data will complement and enrich primary data, enabling deeper and more sophisticated analysis and serving as another source for detecting and validating adverse event signals.”

Ultimately, it is of course early days and experts are divided, but the value of the possibility cannot be denied. Foy’s cautious patience at this stage could prove to be prudent, but there are compelling practical and ethical arguments for social media and secondary data as an important, perhaps crucial, source of timely, real-world data collection for pharmacovigilance. As Sloane, Osanlou, Lewis, Bollegala, Maskell and Pirmohamed state: “The rapid development of technology brings with it the opportunity to harvest vast amounts of data, both from social media and emerging biomedical technologies, to allow earlier signal detection, develop early warning systems, and enhance pharmacovigilance and patient safety. If data is harnessed correctly, the field of pharmacovigilance could potentially undergo a revolution.”

No comment yet.

Chiffres-clefs réseaux sociaux : l’infographie en français la plus complète que je connaisse !

From www.reseaux-professionnels.fr

115 données intéressantes à propos réseaux sociaux, résumées en une infographie, en français !
DocBiodiv's curator insight, February 17, 9:59 AM
Parmi les nombreux articles intéressants du site, Instagram : 10 idées de publications pour animer le compte de votre entreprise Publié le 9 février, 2017
Magali Jacolin's curator insight, March 15, 6:20 AM
Les chiffres des réseaux sociaux sont toujours difficiles à trouver, ils sont éparpillés sur différents sites. Cette infographie en regroupe beaucoup (et les sources sont citées !). Vraiment très intéressant.

Social Media Content: 5 Key Things Pharma & Life Science Companies Should Know 

From www.lmwrite.com

Life sciences, medical diagnostics and pharma-related companies – especially those under the FDA’s umbrella – are reluctant practitioners of content marketing and the use of social media platforms.

B2B Content Performance on Social Media

As someone who has worked with B2B businesses for years, it’s a reality I long ago came to terms with: for maximum engagement, B2C type content outshines B2B content…by a huge margin.

One of the challenges B2B content marketers face is that few industries are the same in terms of how content will perform on social media. What works for a marketing company isn’t effective for pharmaceutical companies. What audiences find engaging for a travel site is very different from say, a Dutch engineering firm’s content.


Social Media Anxiety of Pharmaceutical Companies

The pharmaceutical social space – from contract research & manufacturing to analytical instrumentation, oncology, diagnostics, lab disposables, medical devices, research, and related fields, products and services is a bit of a strange beast. I think Tracy Staton summed up pharma’s relationship with social quite well at FiercePharma:

“Chatting with the public is not in pharma’s comfort zone. …Put your average, everyday drug company in the middle of a public conversation and it freezes up. Worried it will say the wrong thing, sensitive to criticism, mindful of unintended consequences, drugmakers usually prefer to stand by the punch bowl and check their iPhones for messages. You could say pharma has social anxiety.”

She goes on to suggest what I’ve also found to be true: regulated drug companies tend to stick to a single product or – more likely – a disease state, such as breast cancer or Alzheimer’s. It’s a sensible solution, since it reduces the risk of running into problems with regulators.

But many life sciences-related companies do understand the value of content marketing – and how social media can increase awareness of their brand as well as start conversations with their potential customers.


So how does the pharma industry stack up against other segments, in social media world?

Recently I attended the Technology for Marketing (TfM) conference, and I’m finally working through materials and notes from various sessions.

One session in particular I found extremely interesting – The Science of Content – especially since it speaks to something that is always top-of-mind to me as a content writer.

Here’s how BuzzSumo and TfM – who collaborated on the research and ran the session – described it:

“The problem with following the latest trends is that what works in other markets may be entirely the wrong thing for your industry. …the key challenge is creating something that resonates strongly with your audience, and that ‘thing’ can vary significantly from market to market.”

The session shared the findings of BuzzSumo and TfM, taken from 150,000 articles from across 10 industries. Among the industries studied were several in which we work: pharma, marketing, financial, IT and travel. (Others in the study included: non-profits, news, fashion, automotive and electronics.)


Average Numbers for Social Sharing


TfM looked at 15,000 posts from each industry segment and it was interesting to see the differences in average shares per post. News items, for instance, received an average of 17,747 shares, while pharma posts saw just 34 shares on average.

Understanding the response level benchmarks for your industry helps provide a realistic expectation of your social program’s performance.

 
 
Best Social Channels for Life Sciences

The Buzzsumo/TFM research confirmed Facebook’s dominance – especially in the news and consumer markets where Facebook makes up 90+% of all shares. And – no surprise for B2B marketers – they found that in B2B segments such as pharma, Facebook still played a role (34%) – but it was much more balanced by LinkedIn at 43% and Twitter (22%).

Pinterest, as expected, played a role in Fashion, and Google+ … well, here’s their finding: “It has little relevance as a content distribution [channel] in any market.” Ouch.

 
Most Successful Length for Pharma Content


It turns out that content length varies by industry. The automotive industry, for example, prefers shorter content (0-1,000 words), while the I.T., financial, pharma and travel industries tend to consume more long-form material (1,000-10,000 words). Pharma’s two most successful content lengths were 1,000 – 2,000 words and between 3,000 – 10,000 words – the segments coming in at 29% and 30% respectively.

Word count for marketing was similarly high – we have a lot to say. The general rule for most industries? Longer, in-depth content tends to get more shares and links – especially in B2B.

 
Best Types of Social Content for Pharma

This is one of the most frequent questions I am asked – “What should we write about or share and should we use video?” The TfM report laid out the typesof content you should be creating. It told us exactly what works for getting shares. Content studied was defined as: Infographic, List, How-to article, Why Posts, What Posts, Video or All Content.

Among the key findings: video works particularly well in news media, but underperforms in pharma and IT. How-to articles were by far the most-shared financial content, while lists were popular in the pharma sector. Overall, list posts and general news-style headlines performed best for pharma.


When to Post on Social Media

There weren’t too many surprises about when to publish content during the week. In the B2B industries, content didn’t perform well generally on weekends. For pharma, posts published on Wednesday and Thursday received the most shares.


It Isn’t Just About the Numbers

Overall, the report was valuable in highlighting the vast differences that exist engagement-wise between B2C and B2B segments. It also reinforces something I find myself frequently explaining to life science and pharma B2B clients: they will not experience Kardashian-level engagement, and that’s not a bad thing.

When 50 people in the life sciences industry (people who are actually invested in the client’s pharma-related subject matter) share or engage with their content, it’s going to be more valuable – and impactful on the Company’s bottom line – than thousands of likes or shares by the general public.

That’s the key takeaway of B2B social: accurately identifying, finding and targeting your audience, and tailoring the message to your audience.

No comment yet.

Social Media in Health Care: The Benefits, Challenges, and Opportunities

From blog.hootsuite.com

In recent years, the use of social media in health care has skyrocketed. From Tweets to Facebook posts, health care authorities and practitioners are increasingly turning to social media to promote awareness, encourage patient engagement, and increase the spread of accurate health messaging. And they’re doing so while remaining fully compliant with regulators.

According to the Pew Institute, the growing popularity of social media in health care can be attributed to two key factors:

  1. The widespread use of social media tools
  2. The growing desire for patients, particularly those afflicted by chronic illness, to connect with each other

Coupled with other online resources, social media now largely impacts the way people interact with information—including health-related content. And while most patients continue to prefer face-to-face interaction with their health care providers, online health resources, including social, are now an extremely important supplementary tools in their health journey.

In this post we’ll look at several key ways health care can benefit from social media. We’ll also take a look at some of the challenges related to social media in health care and offer several solutions to mitigate those risks.

The benefits of using social media in health care

Social media offers health care organizations and practitioners many benefits. In this section we’ll look at three of the top situations where social can be especially helpful to the industry: during a crisis, to help build brand authority, and to raise awareness for a particular cause.

Benefit 1: communicating during a crisis

During a public health crisis, social media is proving particularly beneficial at helping to inform and protect thanks to the instantaneous and wide-reaching ability of the tool.

Consider, as an example, the 2016 Zika outbreak. Originating in Central and South Americas and the Caribbean, the latest outbreak of the mosquito-transmitted virus quickly gained notoriety for is particularly devastating effects on babies in utero. Untreatable and highly-transmittable, Zika presented enormous challenges to health care providers desperate to minimize its spread.

Largely unknown to health care practitioners outside of the virus’ epicenter, Zika posed several unique challenges to the industry, including:

  • Building awareness and transmission prevention knowledge amongst frontline health care practitioners.
  • Disseminating prevention information to civilians (including remote and rural dwellers) and at-risk travelers.
  • Minimizing the spread of misinformation related to treatment, risk zones, and prevention.

To tackle these challenges, major health care authorities, such as the Center for Disease Control (CDC), turned to social media. From the initial outbreak through to their ongoing response in the months that followed, the CDC used social media to rapidly disseminate accurate health information to both the health care community and the public in general.

Initial outbreak: crisis communication

Quickly after the outbreak in early 2016 the CDC began issuing public health notices about Zika on both their Twitter and Facebook feeds—providing information on its symptoms, transmission, localization, and prevention techniques.

 

During this initial response phase, the focus of their efforts were two-fold: to minimize the spread of misinformation and to contain the spread of the virus itself. To the former, the CDC regularly hosted Twitter chats with Zika experts aimed at connecting the general public with accurate Zika facts related to its status, prevention and transmission. To minimize the spread of the virus, the CDC heavily posted updates advising against travel to Zika-affected areas.

Ongoing response: building awareness amongst practitioners

While not a new virus, Zika was largely unknown by many health care practitioners at the time of the 2016 epidemic. To increase understanding and prevention awareness, the CDC employed social to promote their Zika Training Resources to practitioners.

 

Other physician targeted awareness tactics, such as regular twitter chats with Zika experts, also helped the CDC arm frontline health care providers with critical preventative information.

 

Physicians, such as Texas-based OB/GYN Dr. Danielle Jones, have applauded social media for its awareness-building role during the outbreak. As Jones notes, social media helped to put Zika on her radar. As a result, she was able to decisively advise her pregnant patients against travel to Zika-active regions.

Ongoing response: raising local health awareness

During Zika’s outbreak in Puerto Rico, CDC First Responder Iban Khan employed social media to increase prevention messaging retention amongst local civilians.

“When I landed, I realized there were a lot of gaps in message retention and people understanding what was important,” Iban said. To narrow that gap, Iban and his team launched an unprecedented virus awareness campaign through Facebook Live Chat. Especially popular in Puerto Rico, Live Chat helped Iban and his team to directly communicate with the public and answer their questions.

Ongoing response: continued preventative care

By the late summer of 2016, public hysteria towards the outbreak had started to wane. Despite this, the CDC knew that the threat of Zika persisted and that avoidance of another large-scale outbreak would require continued awareness building efforts.

 

In response, the CDC has continued to utilize social media to frequently drive home the importance of Zika prevention practices.

 

Benefit 2: establish brand authority

The internet has dramatically changed how people seek their health information. While face-to-face consults with health professionals are still the first choice for patients, according to a study by the Pew Institute, patients now also actively engage with online health resources to guide their health decisions.

Further, they’re using online resources to supplement physician advice with their own research and talk with peers about doctors, medications, and more. Within this trend, social media factors as a major tool through which patients seek, converse about, and share their health findings.

For practitioners, the growing demand for trustworthy and accessible medical information presents an exciting opportunity to engage the new digitally empowered patient. Social media, given its vast global adoption and high-degree of interaction, is one of the most powerful ways to engage within this new health care landscape.

Health care providers who want to elevate their brand authority amongst patients need to go where their patients are—on social media. Several key attributes make social media particularly useful to health care brands: listening and monitoring, engagement, and content dissemination.

Monitor evolving patient interests

Social media can be especially useful to providers looking to understand their patients’ concerns. By monitoring social media, blogs, forums, review sites, and other digital sources, health care teams can better understand what patients want and need. Those insights can then be used to help create relevant content that speaks to the interests of a targeted patient segment.

Increase trust and credibility

For many patients, social media is an environment in which they feel a great sense of belonging and trust. They view participants within that sphere as their peers and confidants, and commonly seek advice from within that realm. As such, many physicians today are utilizing social as a powerful way tap into these personal networks to make their messaging more credible and motivating.

Practitioners like Boston-based Dr. Kevin Pho actively engages in Twitter to connect with patients. With close to 150,000 followers, he also uses Twitter as a powerful platform to influence health practices with his original health content.

 

For other providers, Twitter chats, LinkedIn forums, and Facebook posts can also be extremely effective ways to reach patients concerned about a particular health issue.

Benefit 3: raise awareness for campaigns and programs

On the campaign front, social media can also help health care providers achieve unparalleled reach for a particular health cause or issue. As with brand awareness, these social campaigns succeed by going to where the patients are—encouraging participation within the very environment concerned patients are already active.

Organizations like Diabetes New Zealand frequently use social media to encourage and direct participation in their web-based diabetes awareness chat, #diabeteschat. The organization successfully builds awareness about its chats by tapping directly into the personal social networks of its audience on Twitter and Facebook.

 

The challenges of using social media in health care

Challenges, of course, continue to persist in the world of social media in health care—with issues of compliance and security topping the list. With several simple precautions however, the challenges related to social media for health care providers can easily be overcome.

Staying compliant

In the heavily regulated health care industry, remaining compliant to ethical requirements and protecting patient information is critical. For large organizations with multiple social media users, establishing best practices for social media use can help ensure the collective compliance of all users.

Guidelines towards acceptable and forbidden content, data handling, patient engagement and even tone are a few best practice examples organizations can implement to keep their team compliant.

Staying secure

Simple measures can successfully safeguard health care organization against security breaches. The use of social media platforms, for example, are a great way to manage a social strategy across multiple internal teams without the risk associated with disorganized efforts.

With best of class platforms, organizations can quickly lock down their social media accounts from a single secure dashboard. A single management platform can also prevent the release of non-compliant materials and provide audible records of patient conversations.

Using social media in health care opens up opportunities

In just a few short years, the health care industry has had to respond to dramatic shifts in patient expectations precipitated by an increasingly digital world. Innovative health care providers are quickly adapting by creating highly engaging and helpful experiences for patients—while also remaining fully compliant. For any health organization wanting to remain competitive, embracing this new era of patient interaction is of the utmost importance.

With social media, health care professionals can gain unprecedented opportunities to connect with patients and promote healthy living. Moving forward, health organizations are encouraged to provide the framework to keep their practitioners and employees compliant while actively engaging in this new world.

No comment yet.

The Social Check-up: how pharma companies are using social media to engage their audiences

From www.slideshare.net

FOR THE FULL REPORT, EMAIL TheSocialCheckup@ogilvy.com! Over the past decade, the rise of social media has caused a huge shift in the way businesses interact w…
PatientView's curator insight, February 11, 4:58 AM

How pharma engages with soical media

Social Media Etiquette for Pharmacists

From www.slideshare.net

Talk given at the UP College of Pharmacy Emilio T. Yap Auditorium for the UP Pharmaceutical Association, 25 Jan 2017
No comment yet.

30 Facts & Statistics On Social Media And Healthcare

From getreferralmd.com

Constantly evolving social technology and user centric trends make for the perfect digital strategy storm! What platforms are better suited to adapting to drastic changes than those that focus on individualized care?  In this article, we highlight the most relevant statistics of social media and its impacts on the healthcare industry!

1. 42% of individuals viewing health information on social media look at health-related consumer reviews. (Source PWC)

Takeaway:  Audiences are seeking collective knowledge when it comes to their health related decision making.  Having multiple voices who can relate to a similar situation, or who have experienced similar circumstances, will always garner greater persuasion than that of a single brand.

2.  32% of US users post about their friends and family’s health experiences on social   media. (Source PWC)

Takeaway: Social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Google, or even SnapChat have become the modern day blog forums for folks to vent about their loved ones healthcare stories and/or struggles.  For healthcare brands and startups, there’s huge potential in connecting with these caregivers and patients.
3. 29% of patients viewing health information through social media are viewing other patients’ experiences with their disease. (Source PWC)

Takeaway: Patients want the most reliable information possible from their physicians/doctors, but want to familiarize themselves with others experiencing the same obstacles and concerns. Connecting with others suffering from the same disease(s) gives patients a basis on how things could go – regardless if it’s for better or for worse.  

4. Of all the individuals viewing healthcare information on social media, 24% are viewing health-related videos/images posted by patients.  (Source PWC)

Takeaway: Straight from the source on a visual scale that is both irrefutable and incredibly compelling. Patients that post videos or images from a relatable stance tend to generate far more engagement as opposed to normal text only posts.

 

5. 74% of internet users engage on social media. 80% of those internet users are specifically looking for health information, and nearly half are searching for information about a specific doctor or health professional.  (Source PewResearch)

Takeaway: Millions of people globally are using social media actively on a daily basis, and a great deal are wading through vast amounts of “social noise” looking for treatment options, disease groups, patient/doctor insights, and more.

6. Information on social media can have a direct influence on patients’ decisions to seek a second opinion or choose a specific provider, particularly for people who are coping with a chronic condition or managing their diet, exercise or stress. (Source PWC)

Takeaway: Patient and caregivers will always seek out second opinions; searching the web helps them to discover via social media (or the internet in general) potential alternatives to diagnoses and/or treatments they otherwise wouldn’t know about.

7. Some of the most engaged and active audiences on social media are individuals coping with a disability or chronic condition, including heart disease, cancer, diabetes and people who have recently experienced a medical emergency. (Source PewResearch)

Takeaway: People who have undergone or are coping with a disability or chronic condition want their voices heard. They want to share their personal insights, that could potentially help another patient who is struggling. They don’t just care – they want to make a real difference and pay it forward.

8. 81% of hospitals said service lines expressed an interest in participating in the hospital’s social media strategy. (Source AFIA)

Takeaway: It’s important for facilities to have their own accredited policies surrounding the use of social media, as it’s an invaluable tool for communication, reputation building, and general education purposes beyond the doors of the hospital.

9. 60% of consumers say they trust doctors’ posts versus 36% who trust posts from a pharma firm. (Source MDDI)

Takeaway: Self explanatory – doctors are trusted more than brands themselves, because of their background. If brands want to build greater trust, it’s worth looking to strategically align themselves with medical influencers in the social space.

10. 50% of healthcare apps available to consumers can be downloaded for free and are produced by a variety of developers. (Source IMS Institute)

Takeaway: Healthcare apps are all the rage – and for good reason. Portable medical data is coming soon; patients want more control over their health from a data ownership standpoint (let alone a physical standpoint).

11. 27% of patients comment or post status updates based on health-related experiences. (Source MDDI)

Takeaway: Health is a very personal experience, but one that we all benefit from. Patients care about other patients, and want to provide as much information as possible (or obtain as much information as possible) in order to make the best decisions they can.

12. Among the 165,000 health & medical apps now on the market, nearly two thirds are focused on general wellness issues like fitness, lifestyle & stress, and diet. The remainder is made up by apps focused on specific health conditions (9%), medication info & reminders (6%), and women’s health & pregnancy (7%). Mental health apps led among disease specific apps, followed by diabetes (Source iMedicalApps)

Takeaway: While a preventative focus is important, apps are a surefire way to monitor what is and isn’t working. This translates across all facets of general health, mental health, and disease specific conditions that need more granular, individualized attention.

13.  $392,000,000 is the revenue from mobile healthcare apps in 2015 (source: Northern Kentucky University)

Takeaway: The app space isn’t getting smaller anytime soon. The healthcare space in particular, is set to grow exponentially as the largest generational segment of individuals in the US (the Baby Boomers) begins retiring and increasingly familiar with tech.

14. California, New York, and Texas hospitals use social media the most of any other state. (Source Master of Health Administration)

Takeaway: This is interesting! If you don’t live in one of these states, maybe it’s time to take a look at your social presence!

15. 88% of physicians use the Internet and social media to research pharmaceutical, biotech and medical devices. (Source Master of Health Administration)

Takeaway: Doctors and physicians need access to information too – it’s important for them to diversify their knowledge base by keeping up to date on medical developments, tech, and treatments.

 

 

16.  Out of the 5,624 hospitals in the United States, only 1,501 are using a form of social media, which equates to approximately 26%. (Source OXZ IN)

Takeaway: Social media is an incredibly powerful tool for garnering influence, reaching audiences, and building brand awareness and trust. Social media is not only good for your patient base, it’s good for your employees too.

17. Healthcare marketers use social media less often than other marketers. (Source Content Marketing Institution)

Takeaway: Healthcare organizations are often locked in archaic methodologies that worked wonders for them in the past, and their size makes it difficult to suddenly adapt to newer trends and tech. While somewhat disadvantaged, this doesn’t mean they can’t turn around in a timely fashion with a properly implemented digital strategy tailored to their specific need and goals.

18. On average, healthcare marketers spend 23% of their total marketing budget on content marketing activities, compared to 31 percent for all marketers.  (Source Content Marketing Institution)

Takeaway: There’s a knowledge gap between best practices for content marketing and compliance-mandated content marketing. Many healthcare marketers are afraid of triggering an Adverse event, or exposing themselves in a way that might cause financial ramifications or bad press. Too often, this means the quality of this component of their  marketing suffers.

19. Healthcare marketers tend to use print at higher rates than other marketers.  For print magazines 47% of healthcare marketers use them versus 35%, and for print newsletters 43% of healthcare marketers use them, versus 28%.  (Source Content Marketing Institution)

Takeaway: This goes back to using outdated methodologies – much of their consumer base is rooted in older tricks of the trade. As is the tech the marketers use, and the age of the marketers themselves. New tech requires new blood; adaptation is never easy, but it’s inevitable. Audiences will be talking about your brand whether you’re on social media or not.

20. There are 695 hospitals on YouTube and 1,116 hospitals on 4Square. (Source Becker’s Spine Review)

Takeaway: 4Square is a powerful tool that provides additional audience insights regarding geographic-specific preferences. With such low participation, this could be an area of opportunity for physical clinics, hospitals, and specialist practitioners looking to generate stronger relationships with their localities.

 

 

21. 72% of all internet users are active social media users. (Source CDW)

Takeaway: Can you fathom this number? It’s in the hundreds of millions for the USA alone. Imagine what they all have to say!

22. 43% of baby boomers are starting to leverage social media for healthcare related information.  (Source Mature Marketing Matters)

Takeaway: The silver surfers (as they’re called) are coming out in droves – ease of access, quality and quantity of information, and more qualified sources means this crowd is well armed and equipped to make those important healthcare related decisions while heading into retirement.

23. There are 27.4 million people over the age of 55 engaged in social networking, and 19 million of those use Facebook.  (Source 4 Imprints)

Takeaway: Facebook is easily the social media that trumps all other channels – it’s diverse, unique, and offers an array of information if you know where to look. It also benefits from the ability to connect individuals, both far and wide, via similar interests.

24.  53% of physician practices in the United States have a Facebook page. (Source CDW)

Takeaway: Astounding! We just learned audiences are 60% more likely to trust doctors that are online than those that aren’t! This means 50% of doctors in the US aren’t expanding their reach beyond their localities.

25. There are at least 967 hospitals on Twitter and around 3,000 hospitals have a company page on LinkedIn. (Source Becker’s Spine Review)

Takeaway: LinkedIn by far is a healthcare provider favorite – but mostly for recruiting and employments means. It’s not the place to generate a true “following”, or engage with audiences via their brand. The lack of Twitter accounts is an example of this.

 

26. 16% of Facebook users post reviews of medication, treatments, doctors or insurers. (Source Becker’s Spine Review)

Takeaway: This may seem like a small number, but remember – there are 191.3 MILLION users in the US alone. The quantity, let alone quality of the content being posted by several million users is absolutely invaluable to your brand.

27. 18 to 24 year olds are more than 2x as likely than 45 to 54 year olds to use social media for health-related discussions. (Source Mediabistro)

Takeaway: The millennial generation is constantly pushing the evolution of social technology – and the age of transparency in business is upon us. Audiences want their voices to be heard, so user-centric businesses must respond to these voices in order to stay relevant.

28. 30% of adults are likely to share information about their health on social media sites with other patients, 47% with doctors, 43% with hospitals, 38% with a health insurance company and 32% with a drug company. (Source Fluency Media)

Takeaway: Older generations have their preference of media, just as younger generations do. But don’t discount their presence among diversified platforms – there’s still a bounty of information to be revealed by these quieter audience segments.

29. 23% of drug companies have not addressed security and privacy in terms of social media. (Source Mediabistro)

Takeaway: This is troublesome; brands that aren’t online are still being talked about online. It’s to their advantage to create an online presence that allows consumers to approach them directly. But it’s moreso important for them to develop a best practices process and fulfill compliance requirements so they can do so without the fear of repercussion.

30. YouTube traffic to hospital sites has increased 119% year-over-year. (Source Google’s Think Insights)

Takeaway: This is awesome! When audiences get to actually “see” what their healthcare providers do, it generates a unique blend of trust, reliance, and inquisitiveness around their brand.

No comment yet.

Incorporating Social Media into the Clinical Trial Process

From www.slideshare.net

This presentation highlights approaches that help research teams to leverage digital approaches, in particular social media, to support their clinical studies …
No comment yet.

Health and Social Media: Perfect Storm of Information

From www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

The use of Internet in the health domain is becoming a major worldwide trend. Millions of citizens are searching online health information and also publishing content about their health. Patients are engaging with other patients in online communitie
No comment yet.

House Call: Social Media Groups for Cancer Patients

From www.mdanderson.org

People affected by cancer—including patients, survivors, advocates, and health care providers—can use social media to raise awareness and create support networks. Twitter and other social media play a big role in fostering online communities for people to find support, share information or experiences, and cope with the challenges that come with cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship.

Tweet chats

A tweet chat, or organized conversation on Twitter, allows Twitter users to meet online at a preplanned time to discuss a topic. Participants include a specific hashtag—a pound sign (#) followed by a word or phrase (without spaces) indicating the chat’s topic or organizing group—in their tweets to contribute to the discussion.

Tweet chats include moderators who keep the conversation going by asking questions and encouraging replies. Conversations aimed at patients and other individuals concerned about or affected by cancer cover topics such as diagnosis, emotional support, treatments, resources, and survivorship.

Most Twitter accounts hosting a tweet chat will post rules on their account or accompanying Web site. Here are some tips on participating in a tweet chat:

  • create a Twitter account at www.twitter.com
  • include the identified hashtag in a post so it becomes part of the chat; 
  • preface a question or answer, respectively, with Q1, Q2 or A1, A2, and so forth; 
  • retweet (forward a tweet using the retweet button or copy and paste the tweet and username into a draft of a new tweet) a question or answer that interests you if it gets lost in the quick pace of the conversation; and 
  • keep posts 140 characters or fewer as Twitter has a character limit.

Social media accounts

Below are Twitter accounts (which begin with an @ symbol) and hashtags that patients and those affected by various types of cancer may find useful. The hashtags shown are used during the groups’ tweet chats or at any time for posts related to their topic. The hashtags also can be used to find posts related to the topic on Facebook and Instagram.

Brain tumors

Brain Tumor Social Media (@BTSM chat, #BTSM) is a patient-run Twitter community offering patients support and the latest information on brain tumor research. The #BTSM tweet chat occurs at 8 pm central time (CT) on the first Sunday of each month.

#BrainTumorThursday is a separate hashtag that often appears alongside #BTSM. Though #BrainTumorThursday doesn’t have its own organized tweet chat, every Thursday people use the hashtag to post new information, questions, and experiences related to brain tumors.

Breast cancer

Breast Cancer Social Media (@BCSMchat, #BCSM) offers support, information, and the latest research pertaining to the disease. Two survivors of breast cancer founded the #BCSM community with the idea that social media could be used to “unite, educate, and empower those affected by breast cancer.” The #BCSM tweet chat occurs at 8 pm CT every Monday.

Lung cancer

Lung Cancer Social Media (@LCSMchat, #LCSM) doesn’t use endorsements or advertisements and therefore claims to provide a neutral voice for patients. The group’s Web site, www.lcsmchat.com, includes transcripts of past tweet chats and a schedule with the topic for the upcoming tweet chat. The #LCSM tweet chat occurs at 7 pm CT every other Thursday.

Cancer in young adults

Stupid Cancer (@StupidCancer, #StupidCancer) was founded by a survivor of brain cancer to build a community, improve the quality of life, and provide meaningful survivorship for young adults who are cancer patients
or survivors. The group’s Web site, www.stupidcancer.org, defines young adult patients as those 15–39 years old. Stupid Cancer also has a mobile app called Instapeer, which enables patients to instantly and anonymously connect with each other one-on-one.

Other cancer-related topics

The easiest way to find an organized tweet chat, informal conversation, or post about cancer or a cancer-related topic is to search the subject prefaced 
by a hashtag and without spaces (e.g., #prostatecancer for prostate cancer) on Twitter or other social media platforms. A useful Web site is www.symplur.com, which provides a platform for healthcare communities and allows users to search for specific healthcare hashtags. If you can’t locate a group that addresses your interests, perhaps you can create the group yourself.

No comment yet.

Étude : les 35-49 ans passent plus de temps que les 18-34 ans sur les réseaux sociaux - Blog du Modérateur

From www.blogdumoderateur.com

Nielsen publie les résultats de son étude annuelle sur l'usage des réseaux sociaux. Surprise : la génération X  utilise davantage les réseaux sociaux que l
No comment yet.

Social Media Optimization for Medical Professionals - TweetAngels

From tweetangels.com

Social Media Optimization for Medical Professionals.   The medical industry is becoming increasingly competitive, and for more practices the key to success in a shrinking market is social media optimizat
No comment yet.

30 Facts & Statistics On Social Media And Healthcare

From liquidlockmedia.com

The more doctors communicate with their patients, the more social media and healthcare align on a daily basis. Dive into these 30 statistics on social media and healthcare.
No comment yet.

Social Media: Patients And Providers

From www.slideshare.net

How to empower Physicians and Healthcare providers to utilize Social Media resources and improve the delivery of healthcare.
No comment yet.