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Facebook pour les Docteurs ? Découvrez Doximity

Facebook pour les Docteurs ? Découvrez Doximity | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Doximity, a social networking site for physicians, allows doctors across the country to communicate and consult with each other on tough cases, in hopes of improving patient care and reducing mistakes.

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2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK
BRINGING THE SOCIAL MEDIA REVOLUTION IN HEALTHCARE
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BIENVENUE !!

BIENVENUE !! | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Si vous voulez aller plus loin..rejoignez moi sur LINKEDIN, TWITTER, FACEBOOK, GOOGLE +...

Want to go further? join my LINKEDIN, TWITTER, FACEBOOK, GOOGLE + community 

 

Pharma Manager & Geek 

 

http://www.tikimee.com/lionel-reichardt#

 

  

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Pharma Companies Urge FDA To Alter Draft Social Media Rules - iHealthBeat

Pharma Companies Urge FDA To Alter Draft Social Media Rules - iHealthBeat | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, Biotechnology Industry Organization and Medical Information Working Group have submitted comments to FDA expressing concern that draft social media guidance released by the agency in June could discourage manufacturers from using social media. The Hill et al.

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Octobre rose : Et si les réseaux sociaux soutenaient la lutte contre le cancer du sein ? #hcsmeufr #doctors20

Octobre rose : Et si les réseaux sociaux soutenaient la lutte contre le cancer du sein ? #hcsmeufr #doctors20 | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

J-1 avant le coup d’envoi d’octobre rose 2014 ... Les médias vont regorger d’articles et de reportages sur le cancer du sein. ..

 

 


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Denise Silber's curator insight, September 29, 11:23 AM

Encore un article intéressant de Catherine Cerisey !

 
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Measuring Influence in Healthcare

Measuring Influence in Healthcare | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

In yesterday’s blog on social media measurement we alluded to the notion of influence in social media. Influence can be measured in many ways and means many different things to different people. How you define it and what criteria you use ultimately stems from the business need to measure influence.

At Precise we have done a lot of work around the theme of influence, more specifically in the pharmaceutical sector.

As pharmaceutical companies become more patient-centric there is a growing business need to understand who the influential e-patients are, what they think and how large pharma companies can integrate their voice into their organisations. Our previous blog around this (Are empowered patients influencing doctors today), demonstrated how the internet and more recently social media had empowered patients, transforming them into a customer, who has the power to influence doctors’ actions, therefore justifying the need to truly understand them.

An example of this was our work to identify the most influential e-patients for a particular chronic condition. Our client, from the Patient Advocacy team, wanted to develop a symbiotic relationship with a small group of highly influential individuals. Prior to identifying these influencers it was very important to get buy in from the client on our criteria and methodology. Our criteria focused on Reach, Relevance, Resonance and Activity. By looking across a wide range of platforms, and applying a variety of research techniques including qualitative, desk, network and engagement research, we were able to identify 40 influential e-patients. We prepared a detailed biog for each patient for the client to get to know these individuals, recommending that our client engage with the top 10. Identifying individuals, and being able to follow their activity thereafter, makes measuring the success for any future campaign easier and more tangible, for instance you will know whether they have engaged with your content by sharing or commenting on it.

The criteria and methods used for the healthcare sector can be adapted for other sectors. The key is to agree upfront on the ‘how’, the ‘how many’, the ‘why’ you need to know influencers and what you are going to do once you know who they are. Remember, the closer social media researchers are to business needs, the more actionable the research and measurement becomes.



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Instagram for Doctors: Dangers of Social Media in Healthcare

Instagram for Doctors: Dangers of Social Media in Healthcare | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it


Ever wonder what your doctors and nurses talk about at the water cooler? Well, grab a paper cup and some Emetrol, because a new app is transporting medical chatter from hospital hallways to mobile devices.

Nicknamed Instagram for doctors, Figure 1 is a new social media outlet that allows users to upload photos of patients’ symptoms and maladies in order to ask for diagnoses, glean some advice or simply provide amusement to their peers.

Immediately after logging on – anyone can sign up – I was reviewing the x-ray of a 90-year-old female with a grotesque radial fracture. Scrolling down started a parade of stubbed toes, extracted tumors and rashes galore – enough to make me regret downloading the app over lunch. But as I kept scrolling (and cringing), my communicator instincts started to develop a nervous twitch. The word “HIPAA” began echoing in my head. Were these patients comfortable being photographed and discussed publicly? Did they even know? And what are the implications of a doctor following care recommendations he received from a stranger on a social media site?

The explanation from app creator Josh Landy, as told to Vox.com, is hardly comforting: “These are people who are talking about a lot of the cases because they’re interesting, textbook, classic versions and they can help.”

To be clear, there are doctors using the app for productive reasons. There are also users like the one who posted a photo of a sutured hand with the caption, “Anyone want to guess what happened here?” Others have taken to posting gruesome photos of traumatic amputations and the like.

Regardless of the user’s intent, it’s only a matter of time before a patient’s identity is exposed on Figure 1. For communicators, an ounce of prevention can go a long way in deterring a privacy breach. Start by educating employees on:

  • Your organization’s social media policy. Most pitfalls lie in the gray areas. Be specific.
  • HIPAA laws. Make sure health workers understand the basics of HIPAA and their roles in upholding it. Encourage them to ask questions.
  • The “rules” of posting online. Whether they want to or not, employees represent their employers on social media. Instill the mentality that nothing is private, nothing can be deleted, and everything could end up on the front page of the paper.

Ill-advised social media posts (not to mention covert photography) have wrought the downfall of many. It’s never been more important to stay vigilant of what employees are posting and where. Otherwise, one unwise post could lead to one “interesting, textbook, classic version” of a HIPAA violation for your organization.


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Crafting Great Medical Practice Facebook Posts: 6 Tips

Crafting Great Medical Practice Facebook Posts: 6 Tips | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it


According to the PewResearch Center’s Social Media Update 2013, Facebook remains the most popular social network among U.S. adults, with 71 percent being active Facebook users. When studying buying behaviors of consumers, marketing research firm Vision Critical determined that social media has a huge impact on consumer decisions. Thirty eight percent of people who liked, shared, or commented on a product on Facebook have gone on to buy the product. Additionally, 43 percent of people who have "favorited" or shared a product on any social media platform ultimately purchased it.

Today’s consumers expect to have the opportunity to interact with companies through social media, and the effort that brands are putting into social media is paying off in a big way. Healthcare practices need to think more like retailers by developing a Facebook strategy for selling their services.

Digital marketing consultancy TrackMaven recently analyzed more than 1.5 million Facebook posts on nearly 6,000 Pages. Here are six pearls of wisdom gained from the analysis that can help your medical practice create perfect Facebook posts:

1. Consider word count
The analysis found that Facebook posts with 80 words to 89 words double engagement compared to posts with only 70 words to 79 words. Take some time to compose a well-thought out Facebook post. Consider using a word processing document with a word count tool to compose your post before you publish to Facebook. This will also help catch grammatical or spelling errors.

2. Use visual content
Posts with photos had 2.35 average interactions per post, versus only 1.71 for those without photos. Images can be used to humanize your practice. Post fun behind the scene glimpses of the staff and practice. Pictures are also a great way to build excitement around a change in the office, such as a new hire or an added service.
        
3. Post during the evening
Posting between 5 p.m. and 1 a.m. can get you 11 percent more interactions than posting during regular working hours. This may be due to Facebook’s algorithm for determining which posts users see in their news feeds. If you publish during hours that are less popular, posts are more likely to be seen by your followers. This doesn’t mean you need to work nights and weekends. Use a Facebook scheduling tool to pre-schedule posts.
       
4. Post during the weekend
The average number of interactions per post remains relatively consistent from Monday through Friday, then trends sharply upwards on Saturday and Sunday. Posts published on Sundays have the greatest reach with 2.72 average interactions per post. Additionally, posts published on Sunday can get 25 percent more likes, comments, and shares than those published on Wednesday. Again, use a pre-scheduling tool to publish on the weekend.

5. Ask questions
Posts that ask questions get 23 percent more engagement. A popular way to execute a question post is through trivia Tuesdays. Ask patients a question for a chance to win a prize, such as a gift card. For example ask, how many ACL repairs has Dr. Smith performed in the last five years? Or, how many people were diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States in 2013? Another way to pose a question is through asking patients to share advice. One post that was successful for me was when I asked patients to share tips for breastfeeding at work.

6. Use an infographic
Infographics are an excellent way to share information via social media. Not only are they eye-catching in a news feed, they are also extremely useful for conveying complex information. Sixty five percent of people are visual learners. Practices that produce useful visual content are more likely to have followers share their post with friends, effectively advertising your brand for you at no cost. Two great resources for infographics are Pinterest and Google Images.

If healthcare practices, particularly small independent operations, want to remain relevant in today’s market, they need to invest some time into developing their social media strategy, beginning with Facebook. Proactive marketers are intelligently engaging patients and future patients with content that builds a social bond. These relationships, which create trust and word of mouth referrals, form long-term business leads that are invaluable for healthcare practices looking to grow.  

- See more at: http://www.physicianspractice.com/blog/crafting-great-medical-practice-facebook-posts-six-tips#sthash.s3CYCe9v.dpuf


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11 chiffres étonnants sur les réseaux sociaux en 2013

11 chiffres étonnants  sur les réseaux sociaux en 2013 | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Nous avons déjà fait plusieurs rétrospectives de l’année social media en 2013. Voici une infographie très visuelle qui reprend des points clés de l’évolution des réseaux sociaux et de leur utilisation. Certains chiffres sont particulièrement impressionnants et ils offrent un regard un peu décalé par rapport aux rétrospectives classiques. 30%...

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Farmaindustria - Asociación Nacional Empresarial de la Industria Farmacéutica

Farmaindustria - Asociación Nacional Empresarial de la Industria Farmacéutica | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Farmaindustria es la Asociación Nacional Empresarial de la Industria Farmacéutica establecida en España. Agrupa a la mayoría de los laboratorios farmacéuticos innovadores establecidos en nuestro país, lo que supone la práctica totalidad de las ventas de medicamentos de prescripción en España.
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About the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research > The Office of Prescription Drug Promotion (OPDP)

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Digital Drug Safety Surveillance: Monitoring Pharmaceutical Products in Twitter

Digital Drug Safety Surveillance: Monitoring Pharmaceutical Products in Twitter | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
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WEB-RADR - Recognising Adverse Drug Reactions

SRDC Software Research & Development and Consultancy Limited / Yazilim Arastirma ve Gelistirme ve Danismanlik Ltd. Sti.
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A social media-based physical activity intervention: a randomized controlled trial.

Use of an online social networking group plus self-monitoring did not produce greater perceptions of social support or physical activity as compared to education-only controls. Given their promising features and potential reach, efforts to further understand how online social networks can be used in health promotion should be pursued.

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The Pharma Obligation to Social Media

The Pharma Obligation to Social Media | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

The patient population is at our finger tips. Technology has provided a broader platform to witness their frustrations, build lasting relationships and work collaboratively to improve outcomes. The pharma industry invests billions in the development of new treatments; they are bold, courageous and imaginative in the pursuit of scientific excellence. Yet, with a few exceptions, remain anxious, nervous and paralysed in social media. The changing environment demands industry innovation and outcome based funding. If science will be at the heart of that drive, social must be the catalyst.

Fear of a brand name?
We invest millions in building a brand, yet remain terrified of its mention in public. Of course, we cannot publicly announce our treatment and associated scientific benefits, and yes we have an obligation to ensure it is not miss-represented either positively or negatively. But are we really at fault if a member of public chooses to discusses our brand in a fair, valid and experienced manner? We live in a free world, and an increasingly global community, we must engage if we have valuable information & insight. Do we not have a moral obligation to respond with valuable insight? Why would we leave Wikipedia with data we know to be inaccurate, when it’s widely considered to be the first point of reference? The vast majority of the general public are wholly unqualified to comment on disease, symptoms, side effects or treatments, but do so with the vigor of a grand-parent championing chicken soup. We have the knowledge, rigor and expertise to harness valuable patient experiences, real-life events and dialogue to support broader society.

But what if we came across an adverse event?
What if we don’t? We all have an obligation to report adverse events. Beyond the rules there is a moral obligation. Many months ago I witnessed a psychiatric nurse discussing how, with appropriate permissions, they monitored patients on twitter – AMAZING! If the NHS can find the time & resource to use social media in such a smart fashion, then big pharma must follow suit.

We’ll be accused of #badpharma and dishonesty!
That is true whether you participate or not. I’d advocate participating and whilst you would never directly challenge an individual, voicing your position to a broadly smart community can only be more positive.

The approval process takes too long.
Social media is not just publishing content. It’s about listening. It’s an opportunity to hear from patients. It’s about understanding challenges & frustrations and working to address them. That alone is worth embracing the social world. It isn’t a fad, it’s been around since society – the playing field just got bigger.

 

As I often discuss, I’m proud to work in pharma. We make a difference, and we improve outcomes. Scientists & their amazing work will be at the heart of that success, but with the necessary courage communications experts can be the key.

 


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Social Snapshot Healthcare

Performics Social Snapshot covering leading healthcare brands' performance in the month of August

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Surgical social media: the physician-patient connection

Surgical social media: the physician-patient connection | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Healthcare should consider social media as a way to better inform patients of procedure and treatment risks, and to streamline efficiencies across doctor-patient communications.

 

Although surgeons already are using the technology to communicate with one another, driving equity of care in the process, we're only just beginning to glimpse social media's potential as a meaningful communications channel linking patient and physician.


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Linkfluence dans les neurones de Danone

Linkfluence dans les neurones de Danone | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
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FDA Social Media Guides Draw Industry, User Criticism

FDA Social Media Guides Draw Industry, User Criticism | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Two FDA guidance documents on how health product manufacturers may participate in social media have each drawn criticism from affected industry and consume

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Article: The Role of Social Media in Managing Chronic Diseases

Article: The Role of Social Media in Managing Chronic Diseases | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
On the one hand, there's the physician who's looking for 'evidence' that diabetes is being managed. On the other hand is the patient argument that 'emotional support' is also a key benefit. One could argue that BOTH sides have merit.


In a blog post titled "Open letter to NPR about Diabetes Social Media piece," Kerri Morrone Sparling of Six Until Me, attempted to refute a claim made by Jason Bronner, a doctor at the University of California San Diego Medical Center, who said "There's no proof in diabetes that social networking is helpful." 

Sparling says "initial evidence suggests that the benefits of social media to people living with chronic illness are real, even though large scale studies have not shown precisely who benefits and how much." 

OK. What we have here is a failure to communicate. On the one hand, there's the physician who's looking for "evidence" that diabetes is being managed. That in-volves numbers such as HbA1c (a lab test that shows the average level of blood sugar over the previous three months; It shows how well patients are controlling their diabetes).

On the other hand is the patient argument that "emotional support" is also a key benefit.

One could argue that BOTH sides have merit.

Topics include:

Benefits of Social Media for PatientsSocial Media and SupportSocial Media & Preventive Health BehaviorsSocial Media and Knowledge SkillsSocial Media as it was Way Back When


Read this article now. It's FREE...

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Alguna de las utilidades del uso de Internet y redes sociales en personas con enfermedades crónicas

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Who owns Healthcare data on Social Media?

Who owns Healthcare data on Social Media? | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Some patients wanted access over his or her clinic/ hospital records (EHR or paper based). Others, want total control over it. The rising trend of sharing healthcare data in social media fueled fears of healthcare data privacy breaches. In this age of smartphones and social media, who owns healthcare data?

What constitute healthcare data? Who owns it? Who has complete control over healthcare data?

Let me describe first the two general types of health data:(Wikipedia)

A personal health record, or PHR, is a health record where health data and information related to the care of a patient is maintained by the patient.

An electronic health record (EHR), or electronic medical record (EMR), is a systematic collection of electronic health information about an individual patient or population

Patients have total control over their PHRs.  Although an EHR maybe co-created by both the HCP and patient, it generally resides and is maintained within an institution such as a clinic or hospital.

In countries with paper based systems of recording healthcare data, the same type of healthcare data “ownership” may be inferred. The patients have total control of their personal health record while the healthcare institution, over hospital/clinic records.

Some patients wanted access over his or her clinic/ hospital records (EHR or paper based). Others, want total control over it. The rising trend of sharing healthcare data in social media fueled fears of healthcare data privacy breaches.  In this age of smartphones and social media, who owns healthcare data?



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Navigating the pitfalls of social media in the Pharma Industry

Navigating the pitfalls of social media in the Pharma Industry | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it


The following article is based on the CIPR Social Media Panel c-suite Podcast that I produced a couple of months ago, which can still be listened to here.

Social media can prove a minefield for pharma companies trying to find the best path through industry rules and regulations, but integrating new, relevant marketing strategies is a must to reach increasingly digital-savvy patients

According to the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics’ Engaging Patients through Social Media report, the top 100 Wikipedia pages for healthcare topics were accessed, on average, 1.9 million times over the last year, with tuberculosis coming top at 4.2 million views.

Given Wikipedia is, according to an article in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, the most used online healthcare resource globally, it is important to know what information patients are finding when they get there and how the pharma industry can improve it.

Misleading the Public?

In June of this year, The New England Journal of Medicine investigated this exact issue by studying the content of healthcare-related Wikipedia pages identifying safety warnings for 22 prescription drugs that are indicated for a range of clinical conditions. Collectively, those drugs had triggered 13 million searches on Google and five million Wikipedia page views annually during their study period. FDA safety warnings were associated with an 82% increase, on average, in Google searches for the drugs during the week after the announcement, and a 175% increase in views of Wikipedia pages for the drugs on the day of the announcement – but they found 23% of Wikipedia pages were updated more than two weeks after the FDA warning was issued, and 36% of pages remained unchanged more than one year later (as of January 2014).

The potential for Wikipedia pages to mislead the public is further highlighted by Dr Mark Hooper, Director at Conversis Medical, who uses the example of the film The Constant Gardner, based on a book by John le Carré, where the plot involves a clinical trial. Hooper explains that the film includes deaths, shooting and mayhem, and is nothing like any clinical trial he has ever seen. However, when he looked up information about the film on Wikipedia, he found that the page asserted it was based on a real event which took place in Nigeria.

It was claimed that eleven patients had died, implying this was as a direct result of the trial, when in fact the trial had actually compared a new drug for meningitis with the best established treatment available at the time. Six patients died while on the current medication, while five died using the new treatment, which, Hooper emphasises, is not claimed as a significant improvement, but neither is it worse. He has since updated the page to ensure it offers a fair account of the facts, but he believes the wider pharma industry must ensure all updates on Wikipedia are accurate, particularly as the site is such a useful way to disseminate information.

Patient Empowerment

Gill Hayes, Global Director of Communications for R&D at AstraZeneca, agrees, and believes that in drug development, anything that prompts a conversation between a doctor and a patient is a good thing, referring specifically to the public self-diagnosing through online searches. While she believes that there are holes in how Wikipedia is put together, using it as a stimulus for getting people to engage with their GP and question why they are being recommended a certain treatment is good patient empowerment.

Of course, there are plenty of other websites where patients can gain information, including WebMD, which the FDA actually partnered with back in 2008 to expand access to timely and reliable information for consumers, while in the UK, the NHS offers the public a symptom checkers website. But Christian Gardner, Director of Media Services at pharmaphorum.com and former Digital Communications Managerat AstraZeneca, states that the IMS report indicates people trust Wikipedia, and believes that pharma companies have a responsibility to contribute to the content on the site. After all, he adds, patients are actually very unlikely to go directly to their corporate websites.

However, at the moment, Gardner believes that Big Pharma regulations restrict their employees from contributing to Wikipedia, as by doing so they would essentially be updating the page on behalf of the company – thereby requiring various levels of approval. On the other hand, he is quick to point out that this is a huge opportunity; after all, the pharma industry has the experts and scientists who can engage with healthcare professionals, and who are best-placed to provide informed opinion.

So outside of the big information sites, what more can pharma companies do to engage directly with patients through social media applications such as blogs, forums, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and LinkedIn?

Growing Acceptance

Gardner believes that while the rules and regulations involved in engaging with patients through social media can make it a minefield for pharma companies, it is not impossible to come up with a successful marketing strategy. However, many are slow on the uptake – possibly due to the fact that measuring the effectiveness and return on investment of social media, as well as regulatory concerns, were both listed by 78% of health and pharma executives worldwide as their leading hurdle to social media adoption.[1] But this situation seems to be changing.

KPMG’s Transforming healthcare: From volume to value report indicates that pharma executives expect their promotional activity will become much more technology-based, with 43% of them expecting to increase their communication to promote products through social media. At the same time, according to research by Accenture last year, over half of pharmaceutical executives list mastering multi-channel marketing and improving digital effectiveness within their top strategic priorities.

Gardner thinks there is a growing acceptance within the pharma industry that social media is becoming so central to communications, and is increasingly being considered in terms of budget, size of team and required resources, that we are now seeing a real growth of acceptance more generally. When Gardner was at AstraZeneca, he formed part of a team that was led with that mindset – one project he became involved with was the launch of an external science blog called Lab Talk, which was seen as a big step at the time as it meant opening up to engagement, but also brought additional responsibility as another channel to monitor and manage. However, his team succeeded in getting the site live due to the genuine support and buy-in they had from the leadership, who opened doors with the regulatory and legal teams and pulled together approval models that helped channel work and made their jobs much easier.

Regulatory Compliance

But as pharma companies look to engage with patients through social media, great care must be taken in what is published online, even if they believe they have followed the correct procedures. For example, the IMS report referred to a case in August last year where AstraZeneca had to pull a Twitter campaign from the Associated Press’s Twitter feed. A reference to a prescription drug could be seen if the ‘view summary’ link was selected within the tweet, which redirected to AstraZeneca’s YouTube channel – this resulted in the product name being included without the required safety information, breaching regulations.

The issue of regulatory compliance is understandably confusing for patients. In the US, the FDA allows pharma companies to market directly to patients, but the rules are very different under the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) in the UK and EMA in Europe, and information is easily accessible through social media whatever territory you may be in. While Gardner cannot ever foresee a merging of global regulations, he does believe the ABPI needs to advocate good examples of social media practice, sharing innovative but compliant examples from pharma companies.

Adverse Drug Reactions

Another important area that the IMS paper discussed was the major legal challenge faced by pharma companies around adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting, as they are obligated to declare all known ADRs to regulators for the purpose of drug safety. The report went on to explain that if a company is monitoring social media channels, then it may also become responsible for reporting ADRs that come to light through this medium. However, by not actually having a formal social media strategy in place, companies can avoid this regulatory burden.

Gardner explains that if a pharma company is not using Facebook to talk directly to patients, then monitoring it is not their responsibility; but if they do, they must monitor all activity 24 hours a day, responding when necessary with information such as how the patient can get in touch in an emergency.

Language Barriers

Speed of response is another hurdle to overcome, especially when dealing on a global level, as information needs to be distributed in the appropriate languages for each country. Coupled with this is the fact that social media has created a new language of its own, with shortened words that are not so easily translatable or localised.

Dr Hooper, whose company, Conversis Medical, specialises in translation and localisation in the pharma sector, stresses that, in urgent situations, or when crisis communications are taking place, companies should still use professionals – ideally local translators – who can provide regional expertise, while keeping control centralised. This means ensuring that urgent social media updates are translated by people rather than via free online translation tools.

Reaching Out

As for the future, Gardner believes that with the right digital listening tools, there is a real opportunity to go far beyond responses to ADR, as patients share a great deal of information online about how they access drugs and what their experiences are in taking them.

He believes that better patient engagement is crucial, but he also feels that social media can provide pharma executives more air time, giving their companies more credibility and personality – just as the rise of online video has done in the last few years. This still applies even if it is necessary to enlist the support of a communications team.

Naturally, there may be concern over the fact that the more senior management shares information, the potential for protest groups to reach them increases, but these are challenges that need to be overcome if the pharma industry really wants to embrace this opportunity to engage their patients.


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Guidance for Industr Internet/Social Media Platforms with Character Space Limitations— Presenting Risk and Benefit Information for Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices

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UK setting up three year adverse drug reaction Web research project - BJHC

UK setting up three year adverse drug reaction Web research project - BJHC | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it
Funding has been approved for a major research project into the potential of a mobile app for tracking and reporting suspected adverse drug reactions.
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FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS)

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Social media use among patients and caregivers: a scoping review - BMJ Open

Conclusions There is an extensive body of literature examining the use of social media in patient and caregiver populations. Much of this work is descriptive; however, with such widespread use, evaluations of effectiveness are required. In studies that have examined effectiveness, positive conclusions are often reported, despite non-significant findings.


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Médias sociaux et médecins sont-ils incompatibles ?

Si certaines règles basiques sont respectées, il n'y a pas de raison pour que…

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Social Media Rules: The FDA Crackdown

Social Media Rules: The FDA Crackdown | 2-  HEALTHCARE SOCIAL MEDIA by PHARMAGEEK | Scoop.it

Studies have shown that 60% of Americans turn to the internet for medical advice. It’s obvious how social media naturally seems like another method pharmaceutical companies can quickly and easily advertise to consumers. Are pharmaceutical companies alone in trying to tap into our unconscious? Would you be surprised if I told you that you could be inadvertently perpetuating such behavior?  

The U.S. is one of the few countries that permits direct-to-consumer advertising of pharmaceuticals. We’ve all see the ads that ramble on about all the potential risks and side effects associated with various medications. No doubt you’ve probably been bombarded with flashy sidebars on the internet promoting one medication or another — some creepily relevant to our own medical conditions. As social media became a part of life for many of us, pharmaceutical companies were quick to exploit the medium. Platforms like Twitter are free to operate and far-reaching. Only until recently has there been a greater effort to regulate the content being disseminated to the public.

In this day and age, Big Pharma might not be quite as cavalier as you might expect. A quick search on Twitter says it all. Almost every major drug company has a verified Twitter account. While companies are generous in providing general medical knowledge or the update here or there that says the company is actively researching condition X, seldom do you find anything plugging a specific product.

Direct-to-consumer advertising on social media has revealed many challenges. Sometimes 140 characters simply isn’t enough to convey all the benefits let alone the black box warnings a drug may possess. The “Twitterverse” is an international community, and messages applicable to one population could wrongfully passed on to another. Some medications banned by one country may be promoted by individuals and corporations of another country. In fact, Glaxo Smith-Kline and AstraZeneca reportedly have disclaimers on their Facebook sites saying that information is “intended for US residents/consumers only.”

But how often are pharmaceutical companies really harping on their own products on Twitter? More likely than not, individuals are weighing in with their micro-reviews on Twitter. Some would argue that these posts could impact consumers. Bad experiences often motivate people to say something. What about the positive reviews? Who is really behind the tweets gushing about Medication XYZ?

So far, individuals aren’t being held accountable for claims they make. Should the FDA as individuals to report their disclosures? Should the FDA be verifying all social media posts that mention a drug? Something tells me there no room in the FDA budget for this. Others would go as far as to argue that this violates the first amendment.

In June 2014, the FDA released suggested guidelines to regulate social media posts by drug companies. Essentially for every post claiming benefit of a certain medication, the FDA is demanding equal reporting of risks and a link to more information to go with it. Sounds impossible to squeeze all that into 140 characters, and perhaps it these guidelines were meant to deter drug companies from using social media altogether to promote their products.

Let’s take a step back to ask ourselves a few questions:

Do you think the FDA is being fair to drug companies, or should we be hearing about the risks/benefits of toilet paper or have the nutrition facts be mandated for a tweet promoting candy bars? Do you think such regulations are resulting in adverse effects by deterring some individuals from learning about some medications? As mentioned earlier, should individuals be subjected to the same rules? Should all our tweets be regulated as potential advertisement for whichever product is mentioned?

To read the other posts in Austin Chiang’s Healthcare & Social Media series, click here.



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