HEALTHCARE & SOCIAL MEDIA
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Patients Turn to Social Media

From www.thedoctorwillseeyounow.com

When you need to choose a restaurant, find a place for a good haircut or an honest car mechanic, it's likely you'll go online to check the reviews on Yelp. Lately, people have been turning to the social networking site for help choosing a hospital.

A new study from researchers at the University of Pennsylvania has found the additional information in Yelp reviews could influence patient decision-making about where to receive in-patient care. At the same time, it could provide valuable information to hospital staff and administrators.

 

The cost of hospital visits and insurance and billing were among the five categories most closely associated with a negative review on Yelp.

Yelp reviews of healthcare facilities provide more specifics than the federal government's survey of patients’ hospital experiences. And more people use Yelp than the government’s Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS, or H-CAPS) Survey website where results have been posted since 2008.

Almost 75 percent of U.S. Internet users reported looking online for health information in 2012 and 42 percent indicated they were seeking health-related consumer reviews on social media, according to researcher, Raina Merchant. But only six percent had heard of the HCAHPS web site. “This divergence presents an opportunity for online consumer reviews to augment and even improve formal ratings systems such as HCAHPS and increase their use in consumer decision making,” she added, in a statement.

 

The University of Pennsylvania team compared about 17,000 Yelp reviews of over 1300 hospitals to HCAHPS patient reviews of the same facilities. HCAHPS collects patient opinion data in 11 categories of hospital care.

The Yelp reviews included the same information in the 11 categories covered by the HCAHPS plus 12 additional categories not covered by HCAHPS: The cost of hospital visit, insurance and billing, ancillary testing, facilities, amenities, scheduling, compassion of staff, family member care, quality of nursing, quality of staff, quality of technical aspects of care and specific type of medical care.

Of these 12 extra categories, two, the cost of hospital visits and insurance and billing, were among the five categories most closely linked with a negative review on Yelp. And four of the Yelp categories associated with positive reviews — caring doctors, nurses and staff; comforting; surgery/procedure and peri-op; and labor and delivery — were not part of the HCAHPS survey.

“Topics that are covered within Yelp reviews are important because they relate to the interpersonal relationship of patients with physicians, nurses, and staff,” said Benjamin Renard, lead author on the study, in the same statement, noting that prospective patients want to know how comforting and caring the staff of various hospital departments is.

 

Patients’ perceptions of what matters most may change over time, according to Merchant, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Yelp reviews are written by patients for patients, and they are written in real time, “ HCAHPS may not be able to respond as agilely as social media to these kinds of changes,” she said.

 

The study is published online in Health Affairs.

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Journée mondiale de l'asthme : Tweeter peut aider les urgences 

From www.numerama.com

En cette journée mondiale de l'asthme du 3 mai, une étude révèle l'aide que peut apporter Tweeter pour aider le personnel médical à anticiper une hausse du nombre d'asthmatiques se rendant à l'hôpital.

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Healthcare Recruitment Strategy: Get Social

From www.healthstream.com

Healthcare Recruitment Strategy: Get Social
April 26, 2016
 

This blog post is part of our ongoing TALENT TUESDAYS weekly series focused on how to improve talent management at healthcare organizations. In coming weeks we’ll feature excerpts from our Industry Perspective paper, 7 WAYS TO EASE THE PAIN OF HEALTHCARE HIRING.

It’s no secret that social media is an important tool for healthcare recruiting. A recent Harris Interactive study showed that 65% of healthcare employers plan to hire recent college graduates. Another Aberdeen Group study found that 73% of 18-34 year olds found their last job through a social network. A 2015 LinkedIn Recruiting Trends Report shows that social professional networks are the fastest-growing source of quality hires, increasing 73% over the past four years. So, if you if you are looking to hire recent grads or Millennials, you know where to find them—social media.

You probably have also realized that recruiting with social media is quite competitive and can feel like a waste of time. The key is getting beyond the job boards and connecting with your candidates where they are. Used properly, a social media recruiting strategy can be a tremendous tool for reducing your hiring costs as it allows you to target, engage, and recruit those that fit your target candidate profile.

Here are a few tips to leverage your online efforts:

  • Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter – Use these social networking tools to talk about employees, job openings, career fairs, and other employment related items. You can easily add a Career Section to your organization’s Facebook page and build a connection with potential candidates.
  • Align with Marketing – Chances are that your marketing department already has a social media strategy in place. Ask for help and be sure to communicate how you plan to use the various platforms for recruiting. Some of these platforms, especially LinkedIn, can have a very steep learning curve, so save some time and frustration by asking for help.
  • Be Focused – This goes back to tip #1: Define Your Target Candidate Profile. The more you know about who you are looking for, the easier it will be to find them. Social media is a maze designed to keep users engaged. Without a clear path or plan, you will easily get lost and waste lots of time in the wrong areas on the wrong people. In addition to your candidate profile, you will want to identify common professional groups (LinkedIn, Facebook), hashtags (Twitter), or related community/association sites (ASHHRA) where you want to be active.
  • Be Active – Common feedback we hear is that social media doesn’t work for hospitals. A frequent response we receive is, “We’re online but nothing really comes from it.” The most important part of social media recruiting is being active. Being active does not mean being logged in or being a fly on the wall in a group discussion, it means being actively engaged. Create conversations, ask good questions, and share great content. It is called social networking for a reason, so conduct yourself online just as you would at a public networking event and you will see better results.
  • Be Consistent – A lack of consistency when using social media usually results in ineffective efforts. It is easy to be active for a day or a week or when you are actively hiring, but consistent exposure is key. Social media becomes a place for you to extend your employer brand and begin building your own community. It does not take a lot of time; in most cases less than 20-30 minutes a day is all that you need to maintain a consistent profile. Use tools like Hootsuite or TweetDeck to automate some of your consistent content sharing, and be sure to watch the ratio of content vs. promotion. Consistency is great, but be sure that 80% or more of your posts are adding value to your audience and that you are not just posting job announcements.

Keep in mind that social media is another “hook in the water.” It’s a very inexpensive way to leverage your employer brand and connect with your target candidates. However, it is more of a passive recruiting strategy, so set your expectations accordingly. It’s a great way to enhance your online job boards and direct recruiting, but it takes focus, activity, and consistency to reveal results.  

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Facebook, Twitter Helping Boston Institutes Enroll Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients Across US

From www.genomeweb.com

Researchers at the Broad Institute and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute are using social media and patient advocacy groups to connect directly with metastatic breast cancer patients around the country and study what makes them genetically unique.

Within the Metastatic Breast Cancer Project, researchers are using Facebook, Twitter, and patients' own online networks to cast a wide net, enroll a diverse cohort, and investigate the genomic characteristics of "outliers" — those who have had extraordinary responses to cancer therapies and those who are traditionally underrepresented in research.

Although genomic advances have led to the discovery of new, molecularly defined treatment strategies in cancer and to the development of a number of precision drugs, the genetic markers of interest are often rare, showing up in as few as 1 percent of patients.

For example, Pfizer in 2011 received regulatory approval for Xalkori as a treatment for the 5 percent of non-small cell lung cancer patients who have ALK rearrangements. Four-and-a-half years later, Pfizer received approval for Xalkori in NSCLC patients with ROS1 rearrangements based on data from 50 people — an impressive number when one considers that the marker characterizes 1 percent of tumors.

Given the rarity of druggable markers in cancer, researchers are taking to social media to broaden their search. "It's really hard to find patients with any particular phenotype that you might be interested in if you're only looking at a single institution or city," Nikhil Wagle, assistant professor of medicine at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, told GenomeWeb. Wagle and his colleagues wanted to figure out ways to identify patients with the genomic and phenotypic characteristics that could help them answer the research questions they were investigating, without having to wait for them to walk into their institutions.

An oft-cited statistic is that around 85 percent of cancer patients receive care at community hospitals, which places the research and investigational approaches at major cancer centers out of their reach. "So, the vast majority of adults with cancer have not had their tissue studied. The tissue in pathology departments is used for clinical purposes, but then they get stored," Wagle said. "No one has really ever asked those patients if they would be willing to have their tumor studied."

The historically low clinical trials participation rate — around 5 percent — among adult cancer patients in the US was another motivating factor for the project. "That's an incredibly low number, and even among those patients, not everyone on the trial gets their tissue biopsied for study," Wagle noted.

His team decided to test out whether by using social media they'd have more luck enrolling patients into the Metastatic Breast Cancer Project. There is no cure for metastatic breast cancer, but the patients are engaged and connected. Importantly, there is a strong network of advocates supporting patients.

Half a year before the project launched in October 2015, Wagle's team partnered with advocacy groups and patients with a strong presence on Twitter and Facebook, as well as individuals who write blogs, newsletters, and have extensive email lists. The project now has its own Twitter hastag (#mbcproject) and Facebook page. The study investigators, including Wagle, are active on social media to get the word out.

"Where we have seen the most traction is when other patients put something on their own Facebook pages and Twitter feeds," Wagle said. "This has started to spread even more organically as a patient-driven movement over the last several months." 

Patients interested in joining the Metastatic Breast Cancer Project fill out an online form and provide information about their cancer. They also give consent allowing Broad and Dana-Farber researchers to contact healthcare providers to gain access to their medical records, including previous lab and genetic test results, and any stored tumor samples.

Participants also receive a spit kit in the mail so they can provide a saliva sample and researchers can compare their tumor genomics to their "normal" genomic data. Investigators at the Broad will perform deep exome sequencing and RNA sequencing on tumor samples, and standard exome sequencing on saliva samples.

Sending spit kits to study participants' homes is becoming a popular strategy in genomics research. 23andMe ispiloting such a service as an easy way help researchers incorporate genomic data in their investigations. One of the largest autism studies launched last week is similarly allowing participants to sign up online, and is mailing spit kits to their homes as a way to lessen the burden of participating in research.

In the first six months that the Metastatic Breast Cancer Project has been open, 1,800 men and women from all 50 US states, and even some from other countries, have signed up. More than 95 percent of patients have completed an online survey, answering questions about their metastatic cancer diagnosis, the treatments they received, how they did on treatment, and demographics.

More than 1,000 people have given researchers consent to collect their medical information and leftover tumor samples. More than 200 participants have mailed their saliva kits back to the project, and researchers are just starting to sequence patients' tumor tissue.

So, far Wagle's team has procured tissue and medical records for dozens of patients. He noted there have been a few cases where the tumor tissue was already used up, or the sample was more than a decade old and no longer stored at the institution.

Collecting information this way, Wagle and his colleagues want to explore the genomic characteristics of extraordinary responders. The National Cancer Institute is also studying these types of patients and defines extraordinary responders as patients who've had a complete or durable partial response to treatment in studies where less than 10 percent of participants responded.

Extraordinary responders have been a research interest at Dana-Farber for some time. Two years ago, a Dana-Farber-led team performed whole-exome sequencing on a bladder cancer patient's tumor DNA and pinpointed two concurrent mTOR mutations as likely responsible for the patient's 14-month complete response on the combination of Novartis' Afinitor (everolimus) and GlaxoSmithKline's Votrient (pazopanib). Four other bladder cancer patients in the same study had stable disease for four to five months. The two mutations identified in the extraordinary responder hadn't previously been reported in human cancer, the study authors said at the time.

Within the 1,800 patients who have signed up for the Metastatic Breast Cancer Project, Wagle's team has already identified a few patients who report impressive responses to the chemotherapy capecitabine. "We don’t have a biomarker for capecitabine, or [know the] reason why a small group of patients have extraordinary responses to that drug," he said.

Another group has shown extremely good outcomes on platinum chemotherapy. "We suspect based on other data that people who have DNA damage deficiency in their tumors might be particularly responsive to platinum chemotherapy," Wagle said. "But maybe there are other genes beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2 that might be mutated in the cancers and we should be able to discover those."

Wagle and his colleagues hope to focus on understudied metastatic breast cancer subgroups, such as women younger than 30 or 40 years old. It's not common for younger women to get metastatic breast cancer, but when they do, they tend to have a particularly aggressive form of the disease. Similarly, researchers hope to learn more about the 5 percent to 10 percent of patients who have metastatic or stage IV breast cancer from the outset.

"We're also particularly interested in using this approach to reach out to communities of patients who have been underrepresented in prior genomic studies, in particular minorities," Wagle said. "It's a real priority for us to be able to understand the underlying genomics of African-American and Latino women's metastatic breast cancer and really try to make the study representative of all the people who get [this disease]."

The Metastatic Breast Cancer Project is being internally funded at the moment, and investigators are still figuring out budgetary needs. There is no target enrollment goal, though Wagle hopes that several thousand patients will join in the first few years. In the coming months, Wagle's group will use social media to enroll patients into other projects focused on rare cancers, such as angiosarcoma, which affects the inner lining of blood vessels.

"Now this infrastructure and network we're building is about patients sharing their data and samples in order to help accelerate research," he said. "But once we build the infrastructure and once this process is in place, a great next step could be to help patients enroll in clinical trials or help identify the right therapies for them. That's certainly something we're thinking about."

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Patient Confidentiality and the Social Network

From www.slideshare.net

Presentation at symposium of the Philippine Pediatric Society Annual Convention, 4 April 2016. Philippine International Convention Center.
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Did social media adverse event reporting just get a little easier for Life Sciences companies?

From odonnellonline.ie

er since social media channels such as Facebook and Twitter launched, both pharmaceutical and life sciences companies have been discussing the adverse event reporting (AE reporting) challenge. The ‘challenge’ here is simply ensuring you have a clear and manageable process in place to capture and report any social posts reporting adverse reactions to drugs or medical devices in a timely fashion.

A new tool launched from IMS Health in collaboration with Hootsuite may provide some companies with the support they need to more confidently address this need.

The Social Media Imperative in Healthcare

Today it is essential to have a strong social media presence in order for any company to be both accessible and relevant to their audience. 80% of people reach for their smartphone within 15 minutes of waking up in the morning. Most of those head for social channels like Facebook and Twitter. Throughout the day people are getting their ‘social’ fix whenever they can. This includes when on the toilet for around 40% of us. Shudder.

Around one third of people use social media for health information and support. Those dedicated to healthcare solutions and services have a responsibility to be present on such engrained channels in order to provide reliable and relevant information to those who need it.

(For useful links on social media in healthcare/pharma – see the end of this article)

The Adverse Event Reporting Challenge for Pharma/Life Sciences Companies

In the past AE reporting was a real barrier to pharma companies engaging on social media. There was a pervasive fear that something would be ‘missed’ or, more so, that the internal team would be overwhelmed with the deluge of reports unearthed through social media monitoring.

Some media AE reporting facts
  • Various pieces of research (and my own personal experience across many social media marketing initiatives) reveal that only approximately 1% of all social media posts meet the FDA requirements for AE reporting.
  • 73% of consumers use social media to search for educational information on their health condition but not to discuss it – so this low volume of AE posts make sense.
  • If you are managing a social media campaign, whether you may receive 1 message containing an AE or 1001, you need to have a solid process in place to meet legal and regulatory requirements.

In recent years most companies in the pharma and life sciences sector embraced social media channels to some extent in their digital marketing strategies. However people are always on the lookout for new tools to simplify the process and reduce workload on internal teams.

Have Hootsuite and IMS Health come up with a useful solution?

With over twelve million users, Hootsuite’s social media platform is intuitive and a daily go-to tool for most managing social media channels. On March 17th, IMS Health announced it has released an AE reporting tool that integrates directly with Hootsuite (one of over 150 tools Hootsuite has as add-ons to the platform).

This is the first Hootsuite integration specifically supporting pharma and life sciences companies and a first in the market. The simplicity here is what’s attractive. For someone who already uses Hootsuite, you get a tailored stream in your dashboard for potential AE posts.

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Social Media in Clinical Research 101215

From www.slideshare.net

The heart and science of medicine. UVMHealth.org/MedCenter Using Social Media to Attract Study Participants Alexandra Tursi, Social Media Strategist alexandra.…
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Hospitals' social media efforts boost reputation, patient loyalty: study

From www.modernhealthcare.com

Hospitals are putting more and more energy and resources into growing their social media presence, but do those efforts bear fruit when it comes to reputation and patient loyalty? New research says yes.
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Bias in Social Media: A Warning Against Crowdsourcing Your Medical Care

From www.meandmydoctor.com

Whether big questions or small, medically related or otherwise, social media users love to take their ponderings and perplexities to their friends to gather advice. Certainly, social media is a great place to poll opinions about the latest movie or book, and some might find asking friends for medical advice online easier than going to the doctor. Some might even feel that this collective problem-solving protects them if they believe physicians’ or health care providers’ financial motivations might preclude sound medical advice. But asking people outside the medical community for health advice carries its own set of risks.

It’s natural to assume family, friends, and Candy Crush competitors would offer medical advice purely out of the goodness of their hearts. But their own life experiences can color this advice and may not be in the patient’s best interest. For example, the patient asking about solving a high cholesterol problem with diet and exercise instead of pharmaceutical treatment might win encouragement from his Facebook friends. He may hear about someone’s terrible side effects while on a cholesterol-lowering medication. These comments will certainly lead him to believe that he is better off without medication, but is he really making a well-informed decision?

In asking friends if he should forgo this medication, the patient likely would not offer the full picture including his medical history. Readers of this man’s status update might assume his doctor is a bully who has never given him a chance to make some lifestyle changes. The 140 character-or-less blurb omits months or even years of ongoing dialogue between patient and physician. Perhaps during the patient’s prior three visits his doctor suggested diet and exercise (most physicians would), but the patient continued to gain weight, making medication the next most appropriate step. The patient is probably unlikely to share this with his online community.

Similarly, the patient’s friends might withhold their own unflattering, socially unacceptable, or simply poor medical experiences. For example, friends who suffered a stroke or heart attack after refusing medication or failing to make lifestyle changes might not admit that on social media. Likewise, the woman who questions taking antibiotics before her baby’s birth will not likely hear rebuke from someone who has lost a child to infection, as loss of a child is painful for everyone involved and typically kept private. Aside from those who turn to social media as their own personal tell-all live feed, friends online typically won’t discuss the risks of going against medical advice, because to share this information is often uncomfortable or socially inappropriate. Or some simply refuse to believe they’re wrong, despite evidence to the contrary.

On the other hand, members of the medical community are trained specialists well-versed in offering advice without bias. Evidence-based medicine is the gold standard for physicians when determining treatment options, and learning to operate within the limits of evidence-based medicine is a primary focus of medical training. Doctors are trained to distinguish appropriate medical studies from those containing bias. That’s part of our expertise on which patients rely. Most patients and friends do not benefit from that experience, so how could we expect their anecdotal “evidence” offered via social media to be accurate? Personally, I could not stand the possibility of harming my patients, either medically or emotionally, so evidence-based medicine has become my strength in offering well-supported treatment to patients.

When physicians suggest a treatment plan, there is usually a body of evidence that supports their advice. Years of education and personal concern for their patients (and possibly a touch of fear of litigation) have trained them to offer the best-supported and least-biased information they know. While friends on social media may offer opinions on medical matters, it is crucial when considering your own health to keep in mind the expertise, motivation, and bias of your source.

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Survey of use of social media for chronic disease management

From www.slideshare.net

Presentation of my MPH class paper on the outcomes for chronic disease management using social media interventions
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The Use of Social Media In Cardiovascular Medicine

From www.radcliffecardiology.com

Social Media utilization and online social networking is booming. Nearly 83 % of all Fortune 500 companies are active on Twitter and nearly 420K C-level executives engage on social media channels daily1 . For decades, cardiovascular professionals have led the way for innovation and research in healthcare and social media use and engagement should be no exception.

Our Patients Are Active in Cyberspace and That is Where They Need Us to Be…

Patients and physicians have the opportunity to engage online like never before—nearly 87  % of all American adults use the internet on a daily basis. The growing number of mobile devices and tools that are available to consumers today facilitates this widespread internet use. According to a research poll conducted by Pew2 , nearly 65 % of all Americans own a smartphone and almost 90  % own a mobile device of some type. Most users engage online daily and the internet has become a major source of information for patients. The widespread use of online resources by patients has created the concept of the “electronic patient” or e-patient. The e-patient is a healthcare consumer who is fully invested in their care—they consider themselves an equal partner with their physician in the management of their disease. They are well informed and use online resources on a regular basis. Electronic patients are changing the landscape of medical care. According to Pew, 60  % of all e-patients consume social media and nearly 30 % contribute content.

Internet use is not limited to the millennial generation—71  % of all seniors go online every single day and more than half of these seniors go online in order to access health information3 . Moreover, nearly 75 % of all patients visit the internet either immediately before or immediately after a visit to their healthcare provider in order to either seek advice or gather information to better understand a new diagnosis or treatment. Much of this online interaction is now occurring via mobile devices— enabling healthcare consumers to access information instantly, even while on the go. Social media facilitates instant communication and two-way interaction between healthcare professionals and patients. This ease of access and the opportunity for real-time dialogue and information exchange provides an enormous opportunity to impact the cardiovascular health of millions of Americans.

How Can Cardiovascular Professionals Use Social Media to Transform Care and Improve Outcomes?

Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of Americans today. As a society we must do more to educate the public and increase awareness of the risk factors for cardiovascular disease. As healthcare providers we have a responsibility to work to prevent disease and modify risk factors within the populations whom we serve. Social Media can be an effective platform to promote wellness and positive lifestyle changes as well as a better way to interact with colleagues as well as patients in order to positively affect outcome.

A systemic review of over 98 publications concerning the use of social media in medicine was conducted in 2013 and found that there were six significant benefits when social media was used in medicine:4

  • Increased meaningful interactions with colleagues
  • More available, tailored, and shared information
  • Increased accessibility and widening access to health information
  • Increased peer/emotional/social support
  • Public health surveillance
  • Potential to influence healthcare policy

I believe that each of these findings is certainly relevant and easily applicable to the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. By increasing our opportunities for meaningful interactions with colleagues, we are more likely to share ideas and innovate. Innovations will provide better treatments and will have the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality related to cardiovascular disease worldwide. Clinical trials can be promoted via social media and potential subjects can be recruited via online platforms. Social media engagement can promote collaborations in research as well as in patient care, ultimately improving outcomes. Providing wider access to health information allows patients all over the world to learn more about their risk for heart disease and may very well motivate them to make necessary lifestyle changes such as smoking cessation, weight loss and increasing physical activity. Given that the majority of Americans now have access to the internet, online depositories of information have the potential to impact millions of people with a wide range of medical problems. Even patients who live in relatively rural areas have the opportunity to learn and engage from an online platform rather than remain isolated from major medical innovations. Social media promotes camaraderie because patients have common, shared experiences. Patients with cardiovascular disease often struggle with the day-to-day challenges of living with a chronic disease and many feel lonely and isolated—often depressed and hopeless. Social media can provide patients with much needed support and the virtual peer-to-peer interaction may very well improve compliance and reduce disease related emotional stress and depression. Given that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the US today, social media can be a great way to track disease and identify patterns in order to better focus on prevention. In addition, social media can help report outbreaks of disease and can assist government officials in disseminating important information during a health crisis.

Primarily for medical professionals, social media provides a platform where physicians can work to influence public opinion and potentially lawmakers for policy change. Blogs—short essays of between 750 and 1000 words that are posted online—offer cardiovascular healthcare providers the opportunity to advocate for patients, discuss healthcare policy, and spur debate among legislators and other political leaders. These discussions can be the vehicle by which changes are made that improve healthcare and outcomes for all patients. In addition, physician involvement in online platforms serves to develop one’s reputation as a key opinion leader in a particular discipline or area of expertise.

However, even the most innovative and respected senior physicians have been slow to adapt social media for professional use. This is not the case with emerging healthcare professionals—the newer generation of physicians has been quick to adopt mobile technology and is making great progress in social media use. Data obtained from a survey in the Journal of General Internal Medicine in 2011 shows that while there is far less engagement online by older physicians, there is significant use of social media by fellows, residents and medical students5 . Nearly 95 % of emerging physicians report daily social media engagement—this is worth noting as these medical professionals will be the physician leaders of tomorrow and will likely set the standard for physician practices on social media platforms.

Social Media Provides Physicians With an Opportunity for Real Impact—Right Now

Patients trust their doctors, due in large part to the development of a meaningful doctor-patient relationship, but also due to a physician’s excellent care, years of training, and reputation as an expert. Trust between doctor and patient is critical—each holds one another accountable and both are engaged in the patient’s treatment plan and invested in the patient’s outcome. This important patient trust also extends to cyberspace.

A recent survey carryied out by PricewaterhouseCoopers demonstrated that most healthcare consumers are much more likely to trust online information provided by physicians as compared to hospitals, insurers, or drug companies.6 The online credibility of physicians offers a powerful opportunity to educate and influence. Physicians have an obligation to engage patients and colleagues in an online environment. In order to maximize the potential of social media in medicine we must improve cardiovascular outcomes. In order to successfully develop an online presence, it is important to understand how to master the meaningful use of social media in cardiovascular care:

  • To treat—engaging directly with patients about a particular disease process, treatment options, and cardiovascular care. The information should be provided generally and not specific to a particular patient. Avoid engaging in an online doctor-patient relationship.
  • To teach - provide timely and credible information and disease-speicific education to patients as well as colleagues.
  • To consult—share medical information and disease-specific knowledge with colleagues around the world. Develop a network to engage with colleagues and discuss best practices.
  • To market—share your expertise and abilities with the world. Highlight your skill set and those of your colleagues.
  • Become a key opinion leader—establish a national/international reputation. Become a thought leader and influence policy and practice guidelines.

Social media use by patients for health care and disease management is at an all-time high. The numbers of electronic patients continues to grow. While physicians have been slow to wade in to the waters of cyberspace, we are beginning to see more provider engagement. It is clear that the physicians of tomorrow will be fluent with multiple social media channels and it is apparent that older healthcare providers must begin to embrace change and engage with patients in cyberspace in order to meet the healthcare needs of a new tech savvy population. The time to get involved is now. Remember, cyberspace is where our patients are now and where we need to be.

References
  1. Source: Twitter.com, MediaBistro October–December 2013
  2. http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/04/01/us-smartphone-use-in-2015/
  3. Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project
  4. Moorhead SA, Hazlett DE, Harrison L, et al. A new dimension of health care: systematic review of the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media for health communication. J Med Internet Res 2013 Apr 23;15:e85. doi: 10.2196/jmir.1933. PMID: 23615206 PMCID: PMC3636326.
  5. Bosslet GT, Torke AM, Hickman SE, et al. The patient-doctor relationship and online social networks: results of a national survey. J Gen Intern Med 2011 Oct;26:1168–74. Epub 2011 Jun 25. doi: 10.1007/s11606-011-1761-2. PMID: 21706268 PMCID: PMC3181288.
  6. Source: PwC HRI Social Media Consumer Survey, 2012
Tiara Holt's curator insight, April 11, 10:13 AM

This article explains how social media can play a major part in supporting those with cardiovascular disease as well as educating the public and spreading awareness.

Takeda Oncology uses Twitter to raise awareness

From worldofdtcmarketing.com

KEY TAKEAWAY: While most pharma companies are staying on the sideline when it come to social media Takeda Oncology is using Twitter to raise awareness around Multiple Myeloma.
Pharma Guy's curator insight, April 7, 9:01 AM

Also read: "Boehringer Ingelheim Uses Twitter #COUGH Hashtag to Promote World COPD Day"; http://sco.lt/6KzTST 

(Infographie) Les réseaux sociaux et leurs audiences respectives

From boulevardduweb.com

Voici un petit guide pratique concernant l'audience des réseaux sociaux à garder sous la main.
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Social media beneficial for sharing, building upon patient experiences, research shows

From www.sciencedaily.com

Twitter, Facebook and other social media platforms can be useful tools for helping patients with rare medical diseases exchange knowledge and build communities, research from the University of Leicester has found.

Patient experiences shared on digital platforms are also becoming a point of reference for other patients, sometimes in isolation of traditional medical sources, the study published in the journal Information, Communication and Society suggests.

The study entitled 'Health Activism and the Logic of Connective Action. A Case Study of Rare Disease Patient Organisations' examined online interactions in rare disease patient organisations in order to interpret how and to what extent patient organisations exploit online networking structures to provide alternative platforms for people to find information on and discuss health issues.

The study suggests that digital media eases one-way, two-way and crowdsourced process of health knowledge sharing; provides personalised routes to health-related public engagement; and creates new ways to access health information -- particularly where patient experiences and medical advice are both equally valued.

Dr Stefania Vicari from the University of Leicester's Department of Media and Communication, who led the study, explained: "This project shows the potential of online communication tools for isolated patient communities and the extent to which patients' experiential knowledge is becoming a point of reference for other patients, together with -- or sometimes in isolation from -- traditional medical sources.

"These forms of organisationally enabled connective action can help to build personal narratives that strengthen patient communities, the bottom-up production of health knowledge relevant to a wider public, and the development of an informational and eventually cultural context that eases patients' political action.

"Not only is patients' knowledge valuable for peer support within patient communities, it has the potential to add to traditional medical knowledge, especially in cases where this is limited -- such as in the case of rare diseases."

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Social Media Has Unrealized Potential for Clinical Trial Communication and Recruitment

From www.oncologynurseadvisor.com

The social media platform Twitter could develop into a useful tool for communicating with the public about cancer clinical trials and for recruiting participants. This study examined tweets about lung cancer to determine dialogues specific to lung cancer clinical trials and where embedded links about lung cancer clinical trials lead.1

Mina Sedrak, MD, a hematology and oncology fellow at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and colleagues found 26 059 tweets containing the term lung cancerbetween January 5 and 21, 2015. After excluding duplicates, 15 346 unique tweets remained. The researchers performed content analysis on a random sample of 1516 tweets and the tweets' authors (tweeters).

Tweets were categorized as related (83.1%; n=1260) or unrelated (16.9%; n=256) to lung cancer. Tweets related to lung cancer were further categorized based on the content of the tweet. For example, 28.4% of tweets (n=358 of 1260) were related to emotional support for patients with lung cancer and 28.3% (n=357) were related to the prevention of lung cancer. Most tweeters were individual people rather than organizations.

Clinical trial tweets comprised 17.5% (n=221) of the sample. Of clinical trial tweets, 82.8% (n=183) pertained to therapeutic trials, 12.7% (n=28) to nontherapeutic trials, and 4.5% (n=10) to basic research. In therapeutic clinical trial tweets, 79% (n=144) related to immunotherapy and 86% (n=158) contained embedded links to news articles. Only 1 tweet contained a link to a patient recruitment website.

“Social media could become a very useful tool for clinical researchers but may also pose some challenges with respect to both noncoercive content and the assurance of privacy, both of which the IRBs [institutional review boards] will need to consider carefully. Future efforts are needed to explore whether Twitter can emerge as a viable medium for promoting accrual to clinical trials,” concluded the researchers.

REFERENCE

1. Sedrak MS, Cohen RB, Merchant RM, Schapira MM. Cancer communication in the social media age [published online ahead of print March 3, 2016]. JAMA Oncol. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2015.5475.

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4 BioTech Companies That Are Doing Social Media Right

From www.omnicoreagency.com

Social media for biotech companies is still a very new space to be in. With a lot of negative feedback and disgruntle users, most biotech companies have avoided these social networks all together.

But to be relevant, many biotech companies have realised that they need to use relevant tools and people. With young leadership in social media teams, the following companies social media platforms have thrived and become excellent examples of what to do to create engagement and awareness online.

Boehringer Ingelheim

Boehringer Ingelheim is a research-driven group of companies dedicated to researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing pharmaceuticals that improve health and quality of life in every living being. This biotech company focuses on the following elements of healthcare: prescription medicine, consumer healthcare, animal health and biopharmaceuticals.

Together with its partners, Boehringer Ingelheim objectives and beliefs can be summed up in a single phrase: Value through innovation. This central concept has become the corporate vision of the brand, and together with its corporate culture, this biotech company aims to lead and learn in the industry of healthcare and biotechnology.

Campaign

Led by two young  millennial women – Patricia Alves and Jaclyn Fonteyne –  Boehringer’s social strategy has a strong backing up the corporate chain. Since 2013, when both women started working for the biotech company, they have developed a tweet chats with specific topics and hashtags, including #COPDchat and #ChatAFib. The chats gained significant first-mover media attention–including a selected case study by Twitter itself, highlighting it as good business practice.

The #Copdchat run by boehringer ingelheim on twitter

Boehringer’s overall social efforts are broad and engaged as it is active on 8 out of the 10 social networks. Unlike other biotech companies, Boehringer’s  social media accounts are all cross-linked and even feature on its website’s home page. Boehringer is exceptionally active on Pinterest (27 boards), Vine (714 followers) and Instagram (921 followers).

Novartis

Novartis is a global healthcare company based in Switzerland that provides solutions for the evolving needs of patients worldwide. Applying its expertise in science and innovation to society’s biggest health challenges, this biotech company has a core value of  responsibility in the healthcare industry.

Novartis focuses on three divisions with innovation power and global scale: pharmaceuticals, eye care and generics. With an aim to develop innovative products in growing areas of healthcare, Novartis is expanding their presence in the emerging markets of Asia, Africa and Latin America. In all these emerging markets, there is a fast-growing demand for access to high-quality medicines and healthcare, and Novartis is willing to provide for that demand.

Campaign

With one of the bigger audiences in the industry, Novartis would seem to have an advantage when it comes reach and engagement, compared to other brands. Novartis is most active on Twitter and Facebook, but also have a YouTube channel where they include videos about scientists sharing views, executives talking about financial results and patients discussing their conditions.

Novartis often focuses on and singles out one of the more than 40 rare diseases its scientists are working on. Over the past years they have included patients views and stories on social media about hormonal disease acromegaly, genetic tumor disease TSC (tuberous sclerosis complex), and blood cancer polycythemia vera.

Using different Twitter tactics to engage consumers, this biotech company uses twitterviews, or interviews conducted on Twitter to encourage engagement. They have done interviews with organisations such as Women Heart organization on heart failure at #HFtwitterview.

The Novartis social media team has also done several tweet chat including #MYDCchat (Make Your Dialogue Count). This chat  encourages advanced breast cancer patients to make conversations with their doctors. Another tweet chat that this brand has pioneered is  #Time2DoMore which is the name of the marketing program to support Type 2 diabetes patients that also includes YouTube videos, custom surveys and a web-distributed infographic.

Merck & Co.

From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people in need, Merck & Co. is committed to improving health and well-being globally. To make a difference in the lives of people all over the world, this biotech company uses innovative medicines, vaccines, biologic therapies and animal health products.

As a company, Merck & Co. is committed to improving health and well-being around the world. From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people in need, the company is guided by a rich legacy and inspired by a shared vision that runs  throughout core of its business. Along with this vision, Merck & Co. is driven by a desire to improve life, achieve scientific excellence, operate with the highest standards of integrity, expand access to our products and employ a diverse workforce that values collaboration – which can clearly be seen on the company’s social media networks.

Campaign

Merck & Co. launched its social media presence in 2011 when it joined both Facebook and Twitter. The thinking behind the company joining social media was to continues to reinvent the brand to meet the realities of the new pharma marketplace, social media will go a long way in helping re-shape their image.

Unfortunately, since 20011, Merck & Co.’s social media community has remained small, with Facebook posts sticking to a safe corporate tone, and its Twitter feed mirroring that tone. On the positive side, the company’s “Merck for Mothers” segment-targeted Facebook and Twitter pages are more conversational and have thrived in comparison to its main pages.

Post on Facebook garner hundreds of likes compared to the dismal few that Merck & Co page gets. Merck & Co. does have an occasional “meet the scientist” feature that adds some personality and gets better engagement. This goes on to show that even if you are in a boring industry, you can still create and tell stories which Merck has done by building a sub-brand that focuses on women issues and that way they’ve built an engaging audience.

Amgen

Amgen is one of the world’s leading biotechnology companies. Amgen is a values-based company who uses science and innovation to transform new ideas and discoveries into medicines for patients with serious illnesses. Amgen aims to use cutting-edge science and technology to study the subtlest biological mechanisms in search of therapies that will improve the lives of those who suffer from serious diseases.

Amgen is committed to unlocking the potential of biology for patients suffering from serious illnesses by discovering, developing, manufacturing and delivering innovative human therapeutics. Amgen’s medicines treat serious illnesses in more than 75 countries worldwide and have reached millions of people in the fight against cancer, kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, bone disease and other serious illnesses.

Campaign

With a following of 36,000 people, Amgen is doing an excellent job on Twitter by celebrating those people who benefit from their products. Not only do they associate themselves with their beneficiaries, but they do it in a proud way. The brand comes across as caring for the people who use their products, and share mostly about their involvement with these people, companies and organisations.

Amgen also share various resources in the form of videos and videos, but unlike Gilead Science’s the engagement with their content is not as high. This could be due to the lack of infographics or the reason that Amgen uses its Twitter account as a form of associating itself with other brands that benefit from their product, and a way of thanking specific organisations for their support.

Even though this is a different way of using social media, it shows that this brand is not afraid to share the success of other brands and organisation. Instead of seeing a competitor, they see another warrior trying to change the world.

Gilead Sciences

Gilead Sciences is a research-based biopharmaceutical company that discovers, develops and commercializes innovative medicines in areas of unmet medical need. As a company they strive to transform and simplify care for people with life-threatening illnesses around the world. With a portfolio of products including treatments for HIV/AIDS, liver diseases, cancer, inflammatory and respiratory diseases, and cardiovascular conditions, this company is doing powerful work to fight deadly diseases.

Gilead was founded in 1987 in Foster City, California, and has since then grown to become one of the world’s largest biopharmaceutical companies. Today it has over 8,000 employees across six continents, and is continuing to grow and develop products to better the world.

Campaign

With over 13,000 followers on Twitter, Gilead Sciences may look like it’s thriving on Twitter as company does one things right: shares powerful content, which is matched with useful infographics and hashtags.

But they’re not a brand that engages with their audience and unfortunately Gilead Sciences have got a lot of negative feedback on Facebook and has therefore only have an unofficial page on this social network. This unofficial page has mixed reviews, and it would be potential be helpful if a community manager for the company could respond so some of the questions of this page.

This goes on to show that having a mere big number of followers doesn’t translate into anything if the campaign isn’t backed by a strong idea that is supposed to have an impact on its audience.

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Note to pharma: Stop fishing social media one hook at a time. A trawl net works much better

From www.fiercepharmamarketing.com

Social listening has become a common tool for many pharma marketers. But it's not enough, says a new white paper co-authored by IMS Health and UCB Pharma.

UCB's Greg Cohen

Pharma typically uses social listening only for one-off projects to answer a specific question. But that kind of tactical thinking isn't broad enough to tap the bigger benefits of social listening, said Greg Cohen, associate director in global strategic marketing at UCB.

"Many of those companies think it's some sort of Big Brother-NSA kind of thing, listening in to all your conversations," he said in an interview. "But it's no different than a lot of other market research applications, except that it's so much more--it's a way for marketers to find out what patients are really saying and how they're saying it."

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He and paper co-author Siva Nadarajah, IMS Health's general manager of social media, maintain that pharma companies that aren't using social listening strategically are squandering competitive advantages and the opportunity to do better-targeted--and therefore more efficient and effective--marketing.

Their white paper cites a Best Practices study that found while 85% of healthcare and pharma companies surveyed are engaged in some type of social listening, only one-third use it as a source of competitive intelligence.

 IMS Health's Siva Nadarajah

And for pharma still using the regulatory "excuse" of having to report adverse events they run across on social media, both authors agree the problem is highly overestimated. In a case of the fear being much larger than the reality, Nadarajah said, 2% or fewer of social media posts are accountable to adverse effects reporting.

They advise pharma companies to do continuous monitoring of social media, which not only results in current patient insights, but when advanced analytics are applied, can help predict future patient behavior.

The value of social listening is a theme IMS Health has been beating regularly over the past few years, but Nadarajah and Cohen said the paper was written now to continue pushing the message to pharma to act more strategically. IMS Health offers cloud-based social monitoring through its Nexxus Social platform.

"Rather than dismissing this dialogue as empty chatter or worrying about the implications of hearing something that might be more trouble than it is worth, industry needs to adopt practices from more consumer-oriented sectors and embrace social media intelligence on a continuous-listening basis," the authors wrote in the paper.

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How Healthcare Social Media Links to Better Outcomes

From www.healthcaresuccess.com

Social media has become so pervasive in American society that it’s impossible to ignore. Yet some physicians still dismiss it as the home for cute pet antics and baby birthday pictures. Mildly amusing, perhaps, but not professionally useful.

Social media (SM) is a nearly indispensible tool in healthcare marketing and communications plans. Yet relatively few doctors are widely recognized (and thus admired) as authoritative SM rock stars.

The benefits of a social media strategy…

The nation’s healthcare system continues to reinvent itself nearly as fast as the Internet has reshaped social interaction. The fact is, some of the most successful doctors, hospitals and health systems benefit from an aggressive social media strategy. And patients and prospective patients might be the primary beneficiaries. Here’s how and why SM-savvy doctors are using an integrated strategy today:

OUTCOMES: Educated, engaged and empowered patients experience better outcomes. When a patient knows what’s going on in their care, they are more actively involved (and more diligently follow) their treatment plan or disease management. Social media tools are an important means to closely connect provider and patient.

PHYSICIAN CME: Doctors interacting with professional colleagues are better doctors. Social media enables physicians to access continuing education, share ideas and knowledge, collaborate with other providers, and gain more immediate awareness of advances in science in medicine.

REPUTATION: Social media builds and extends an online presence. Professional reputation relies on a level of awareness, among patients, among fellow professionals, or both. Social media facilitates an online presence that helps define and direct a positive identity, reputation and visibility.

EDUCATION: Authoritative information promotes healthy living and lifestyle habits. Social media influence is pervasive and persuasive as a trusted source for the general public.

WHERE THE PATIENTS SEARCH: Patients look online first for health and medical guidance. The Internet in general, and social media in particular, represent healthcare’s digital front door. It only makes sense to meet, engage and attract new patients where they are searching for help.

A successful social media strategy for doctors and healthcare providers will integrate several of these elements. If we can help with formulating a new or stronger plan, please contact us today.

CAE Healthcare's curator insight, March 30, 9:03 AM
Key Take Away: "EDUCATION: Authoritative information promotes healthy living and lifestyle habits. Social media influence is pervasive and persuasive as a trusted source for the general public."

The doctor will tweet you now – but should he face disciplinary action for doing so?

From theconversation.com

Why is a doctor facing sanctions for voicing his opinions on Twitter?

 

Many bosses would argue that mixing work with social media is not a good idea. Just ask Christian Solomonides, a hospital consultant who was recently suspended after he admitted posting strongly worded messages on Twitter. The tweets included a description of 90% of A&E admissions as “fucking bullshit”, a complaint that he was “sick of busting balls to ensure that a patient with a broken finger nail (who called an ambulance) is seen within four hours” and a comment that “ADHD is merely a polite term for a child who is just a little shit”. He also criticised a patient for “stinking of fags and demanding calpol on prescription” and called for fines to be imposed on people who “abused” the A&E system.

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Social media in healthcare education, inclusion or just distraction?

From remomd.com

Social media is pervasive, even in healthcare. As an early adopter, I witnessed how social media went mainstream as it integrates into our lives. I’ve also been a witness to the many challenges and opportunities social media presents as it slowly encroaches into the silos of our daily lives.

My struggle though is not always about social media integration or the technical skills needed to do so. I have have always been preoccupied on how social media could or should enhance my learning- to reflective thinking rather than just information, knowledge more than opinion and in healthcare, clinical and patient skills rather than textbook regurgitations.

 

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Facebook Mines Data Off Cancer Sites, Users Say

From www.courthousenews.com

Facebook spied on users that relayed private health information on the websites of major cancer institutes and harvested the data to generate advertising profits, users claim in a new class action.
     Lead plaintiff Winston Smith sued Facebook, the American Cancer Society, the American Society of Oncology and five other cancer institutes in Federal Court on Wednesday.
     Websites for the medical institutes feature a secret "Facebook code" that "commandeers" users' web browsers and sends private information to the social media giant, Smith claims in his 92-page complaint.
     "This lawsuit is without merit, and we will defend ourselves vigorously," a Facebook spokeswoman said in an email Wednesday afternoon.
     Smith says Facebook uses the private health data it obtains to create marketing profiles for each user, and then targets them with tailored advertisements based on their private information.
     When Smith searched for information on lung cancer at the American Cancer Society's website cancer.org, the information he sought and links he clicked were sent to Facebook without his knowledge or consent, he says.
     The lawsuit cites a chart Facebook uses to sell advertising services, which places more than 225 million users in 154 separate medical categories for direct marketing purposes.
     "Facebook's application for advertisers touts its ability to target users based on information Facebook has collected about them relating to health care," the complaint states.
     Facebook's medical-categories list identifies users associated with a wide range of medical conditions, including diabetes, pregnancy, addiction, hepatitis C, HPV, erectile dysfunction, herpes simplex virus and HIV/AIDS.
     Smith says the American Cancer Society and other institutes named in the lawsuit should have disclosed their relationships with Facebook or informed users that their private health information would be shared with the social media titan.
     An American Cancer Society spokeswoman declined to comment on the pending litigation.
     The complaint cites 10 causes of action against Facebook and the seven cancer institutes, claiming they failed to safeguard plaintiffs' private health information under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, Wiretap Act and other state and federal laws.

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9 Doctor Social Networking Sites Every Physician Should Know About - Only 9?

From blog.capterra.com

You’re probably already on the major social networks — Facebook, LinkedIn, maybe even Twitter. But if you’re not on physician-oriented social networking sites, you’re missing out.

Doctor social networking sites offer connection, crowd-sourcing, education, and even some fun.

 

Here are the 9 social networking sites you need to be on, in order of importance. Plus I added a few niche sites for fun.

 

 

1. Sermo

2. Doximity

3. QuantiaMD

4. Figure1

 5. Digital Healthcare: Social Media and Online Tools

 

6. Healthcare & Medical Software Information

7. Medical Doctors Medicos Clinical Medicine n Health

 

8. Medical Doctor

9. Medical Apps

 

more...

Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek:

Not mentioned: Physicians Interactive/Uinivadis.What is/was Univadis? Listen to this Pharma Marketing Talk podcast: http://bit.ly/pmtalk203 - A conversation with Shona L. Davies, Global Communications & Programme Leader, Associate Director, Merck Customer Centricity, Merck & Co Inc., about Univadis, a leading and exclusive online service from Merck/MSD that delivers customer-centric content and high quality medical information to healthcare professionals.

Pharma Guy's curator insight, March 25, 7:44 AM

Not mentioned: Physicians Interactive/Uinivadis.What is/was Univadis? Listen to this Pharma Marketing Talk podcast: http://bit.ly/pmtalk203 - A conversation with Shona L. Davies, Global Communications & Programme Leader, Associate Director, Merck Customer Centricity, Merck & Co Inc., about Univadis, a leading and exclusive online service from Merck/MSD that delivers customer-centric content and high quality medical information to healthcare professionals.