ZipMinis: Science of Blogging
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ZipMinis: Science of Blogging
ZipMinis: Science of Blogging
You search for the highest quality authors and content online, right? Finding the best is tough. Darin L. Hammond eliminates this stress for businesses across the globe. He rocks professional blogging, writing, teaching, consulting, and leadership with his top of the industry content management service, ZipMinis Freelance Writing: • Creating an optimized flow of diverse, irresistible content for the business blogs, websites, and social media networks. • Orchestrating distribution with supreme content management strategies, minimizing risks and worries for businesses. • Promoting fresh brand content through copywriting and potent interactions in social media communities. • Elevating the brand visibility, integrity, recognition, and SEO of the business. • Working in stride with the innovative leadership of the organization, advocating creative innovation. Darin also publishes on many power sites like Technorati, Blog Critics, B2C, SteamFeed, LifeHack, and Social Media Today.  You can enjoy Darin's blogging styles now at ZipMinis: Science of Blogging. Contact him now at dlh@zipminis.com.
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Search engine for social networks based on the behavior of ants

Research at Carlos III University (Universidad Carlos III) in Madrid (Universidad Carlos III -- UC3M) is developing an algorithm, based on ants' behavior when they are searching for food, which accelerates the search for relationships among elements that are present in social networks.

One of the main technical questions in the field of social networks, whose use is becoming more and more generalized, consists in locating the chain of reference that leads from one person to another, from one node to another. The greatest challenges that are presented in this area is the enormous size of these networks and the fact that the response must be rapid, given that the final user expects results in the shortest time possible. In order to find a solution to this problem, these researchers from UC3M have developed an algorithm SoSACO, which accelerates the search for routes between two nodes that belong to a graph that represents a social network.
The way SoSACO works was inspired by behavior that has been perfected over thousands of years by one of the most disciplined insects on the planet when they search for food. In general, the algorithms used by colonies of ants imitate how they are capable of finding the path between the anthill and the source of food by secreting and following a chemical trail, called a pheromone, which is deposited on the ground. 


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from Darin--a fascinating but not unique idea to base human/computer systems on natural phenomena--they've done a lot with the birds and the bees (haha ... no seriously).

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The Dizzying Rise of Social Media in China and What It Might Mean ...

The Dizzying Rise of Social Media in China and What It Might Mean ... | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
For all the folks who have had their confidence in social media shaken by Facebook's dire IPO debacle, it's worth keeping China in mind as proof that the communications form is a compelling concept that is unlikely to ...

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5 Fascinating Things We Learned From Reddit This Week

5 Fascinating Things We Learned From Reddit This Week | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
Some of the most interesting things on Reddit are also the most unexpected. For instance, a post that’s just supposed to make people laugh might leave users learning something new. Or maybe an interesting interview with a celebrity includes a moment that’s fascinating, but has nothing to do with the original topic of discussion.
Those are some of the most valuable moments on Reddit. For example, this week users got a biology lesson in the comments of a funny bird photo. They also learned that the White House makes beer, which came up when Michelle Obama told NPR about gardening.


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Networked individualism: What in the world is that? | Networked

Networked individualism: What in the world is that? | Networked | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it

Social relationships are changing and technology is at the center of the story.
Our work at the Pew Internet Project and the University of Toronto’s NetLab (especially research for the Connected Lives Project) does not support the fear that the digital technologies are killing society. Our evidence is that these technologies are not isolated — or isolating — systems. They are being incorporated into people’s social lives much like their predecessors were.

People are not hooked on gadgets—they are hooked on each other.
But things are different now. In incorporating the internet and mobile phones into their lives, people have changed the ways they interact with each other. They have become increasingly networked as individuals, rather than embedded in groups. In the world of networked individuals, it is the person who is the focus: more than the family, the work unit, the neighborhood, and the social group.


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from Darin--I am big on the Pew Research Center that does valuable, empirical, and credible research on engaging themes. The book reviewed here is unique in examining the networked individual--the individual within the social/network.

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St. Louis Beacon

St. Louis Beacon | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
When I agreed to write a periodic column for the folks here at the Beacon, it was something that comes pretty naturally to me. I’ve always had a number of opinions and have been rarely shy about sharing them. The trickiest part of this whole process for me is the introduction, which is what this piece actually is. I guess there are a lot of ways I could do this, but, at the recommendation of my new editor, let’s just break this down and be methodical about it.

The column’s focus
So let’s start with what I will be writing about. We are going to focus on technology and innovation, along with related strategies and the impacts of technology on us as consumers, their impact on the economy, business, our society and just where it might go next. We’ll try, where possible, to work in relevant local angles and issues, but we’ll also focus on the broader sweeping national stories.

The intent will be to not only look forward at what might happen, but why the companies or markets involved are behaving as they are. What’s important and what drives often are the best indicators of where things are going.

My background
Secondly, why am “I” writing this column. What do I bring to the table that’s unique and different? From a professional perspective, I have been a professional technologist who has been fortunate enough to have held a number of senior positions and to have been involved in a number of different areas of technology, hopefully all of which will combine to make this an interesting and enjoyable read. I’ve been at this long enough that I can separate my experience into decades – scary when you think about it.


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from Darin--Online journalism adding a tech., strategy, and innovation column certainly seems appropriate and a bit late in coming.

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Scientists Find Learning Is Not 'Hard-Wired'

Scientists Find Learning Is Not 'Hard-Wired' | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
Neuroscience exploded into the education conversation more than 20 years ago, in step with the evolution of personal computers and the rise of the Internet, and policymakers hoped medical discoveries could likewise help doctors and teachers understand the "hard wiring" of the brain.
That conception of how the brain works, exacerbated by the difficulty in translating research from lab to classroom, spawned a generation of neuro-myths and snake-oil pitches—from programs to improve cross-hemisphere brain communication to teaching practices aimed at "auditory" or "visual" learners.
Today, as educational neuroscience has started to find its niche within interdisciplinary "mind-brain-education" study, the field's most powerful findings show how little about learning is hard-wired, after all.
"What we find is people really do change their brain functions in response to experience," said Kurt W. Fischer, the director of Harvard University's Mind, Brain, and Education Program. "It's just amazing how flexible the brain is. That plasticity has been a huge surprise to a whole lot of people."


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from Darin--Take this for what it is worth. Though hardwiring of the infant brain is still highly important, this article contends that for educational purposes the brain's plasticity is also important. My conclusion, both are extremely significant realms of knowledge for education--hardwiring combined with plasticity (ability to change and adapt). I don't think that plasticity is all that big of a surprise to most scholars.

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A Study Of 70 Million Passwords Reveals That People Really Suck At Making Them

A Study Of 70 Million Passwords Reveals That People Really Suck At Making Them | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
A worldwide study of 70 million Yahoo passwords, the largest of its kind, reveals that we really need to make better passwords.
Don't worry, Cambridge University academic Joseph Bonneau was not able to see your actual passwords, but analyzed hashings of users across all ethnicities, geographic region and age, according to Sean Ludwig of VentureBeat.
"Even seemingly distant language communities choose the same weak passwords and an attacker never gains more than a factor of 2 efficiency gain by switching from the globally optimal dictionary to a population-specific lists,” Bonneau wrote in his study.
Text passwords have been around since the 1960s, so it seems surprising that there has been such a slow progression in the evolution of stronger codes.
Efforts by Yahoo to have users improve their passwords haven't worked either, Bonneau found.
Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/password-study-2012-6#ixzz1wgF5q5Kf
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Twitter Will Have $1 Billion In Sales... In 2014

Twitter Will Have $1 Billion In Sales... In 2014 | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
Twitter will generate $1 billion in advertising sales in 2014, according to two unnamed sources speaking with Bloomberg News.
Twitter based its expectations on current advertising demand, which is twice as much revenues as what analysts expect according to eMarketer estimates, Bloomberg reports.
Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/twitter-will-have-1-billion-in-sales-in-2014-2012-6#ixzz1wgCLkD3o
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Digital Studies | Sam Kinsley

Digital Studies | Sam Kinsley | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
For Steigler, it is through the exteriorisation of thought, through language and gesture, that we understand our internal conscious processes and this exteriorisation is achieved through technologies of language and writing.
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Nature News Blog: Missing biologist surfaces, reunites with family : Nature News Blog

Nature News Blog: Missing biologist surfaces, reunites with family : Nature News Blog | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it

Margaret “Margie” Profet has returned. In Psychology Today this month, journalist Mike Martin tells the haunting tale of a promising young evolutionary biologist who vanished without a trace. Profet won a coveted MacArthur Foundation ‘genius grant’ in 1993 on the basis of her compelling but controversial ideas about the adaptive value of allergies, menstruation and morning sickness.

She subsequently absorbed an eclectic curricula, taking classes in physics, math, evolution and toxicology on both coasts of the United States at the University of California, Berkeley. She then moved to Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for graduate studies, then West, then East, never finishing a PhD but penning several influential papers and books. After several years in the spotlight, she receded, not just from public view, but completely. She vanished. Martin had taken a physics class with Profet at the University of Washington in the 1990s. He came across some of her work in 2009 and Googled her. He was surprised to see a bare-bones Wikipedia entry with no recent updates and some debate in the discussion notes as to her whereabouts. He spent the next three years trying to track her down.

It was not simply a here-one-day-gone-the-next-type vanishing. She cut ties with her family around 2002 and gradually receded from contact with colleagues, friends and just about everyone else. The trail Martin was following went cold as of late 2004 to early 2005. Colleagues and friends say they fear she was fighting a losing battle with mental illness. Profet’s mother, Karen, filed a missing-persons report with Cambridge police, searched the streets and shelters and even hired a private detective to track down her daughter.

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Seducing the Subconscious: The psychology of emotional influence in advertising - EurekAlert (press release)

Whether it's on TV or billboards, mobile phones or in magazines, advertising is part of our everyday life. But, while we are all aware of it, and may even secretly admire a particular campaign, most of us would likely say that we don't pay much attention to it when it comes to making a decision. But, is this really the case, or are we being influenced without even knowing it? In his absorbing and highly-readable new book, Dr. Robert Heath, a pioneer in the field of brand communications, explains the hidden power of advertising and how by choosing to ignore it we may be lending it greater power.

Drawing on a range of successful advertising campaigns (including Nike, Coca-Cola and Budweiser's "Whassup?"), the works of key thinkers, and the latest research in experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Seducing the Subconscious is a fascinating exploration of the ways in which we process advertising – at both a subconscious and semiconscious level. We discover how and why the most successful advertising campaigns are not those we love or hate or those with messages that are new or interesting but those that are "able to effortlessly slip under our radar and influence our behaviour without us ever really knowing that they have done so…" We find out how to spot when we are being subconsciously seduced and see how new media has made us even more susceptible to the subconscious influence of advertising.

And the best way of avoiding advertising affecting us this way? Heath offers two fool-proof ways. The first is to avoid it altogether (pretty much impossible!). The second is to embrace it. As he concludes, "the more you attend, the more you can counter-argue what you see and hear, and the less it will affect you. It may be tedious, it may be annoying, and it may make your life a bit uncomfortable. But at least you'll know you haven't been subconsciously seduced."

A real eye-opener of a book, Seducing the Subconscious will leave most of us astonished by how much advertising affects our everyday behaviour - and perhaps even more astonished by how little we realize this is going on!

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Sencha Selected by AlwaysOn As An OnMobile Top 100 Winner - San Francisco Chronicle (press release)

Sencha Selected by AlwaysOn As An OnMobile Top 100 Winner - San Francisco Chronicle (press release) | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
Sencha Selected by AlwaysOn As An OnMobile Top 100 WinnerSan Francisco Chronicle (press release)At the same time, business application developers, looking for a way to transition from legacy technologies, have also migrated to Sencha.
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How Blogs, Social Media, and Video Games Improve Education

How Blogs, Social Media, and Video Games Improve Education | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
Darrell West examines how new technologies such as blogs, social media, and video games improve education, and how schools and universities are using these tools to help students learn.
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Dynamix7.com Teaches Local Establishments How to Benefit From SocialNetworking

Dynamix7.com Teaches Local Establishments How to Benefit From SocialNetworking | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it

Local Businesses Across America Are Coming to the Realization That Social Networking Sites Are Essential to Developing a Solid Marketing Strategy; Not Only Does Increasing Online Presence Raise Awareness of a Small Establishment, but the Practice Also Provides a Unique Opportunity for Store Owners to Develop a Brand; Dynamix7.com Offers Educational Resources to Help Small Business Owners Learn These Online Marketing Techniques and Effectively Use Them to Boost Sales.


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Dynamix7.com Teaches Local Establishments How to Benefit From Social Networking - MarketWatch (press release)

Dynamix7.com Teaches Local Establishments How to Benefit From Social NetworkingMarketWatch (press release)PHOENIX, AZ, Jun 04, 2012 (MARKETWIRE via COMTEX) -- A recent article from ABC News examines the benefits social networking sites have on...

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Buddy Media CEO Makes Unforgettable 'We Got Bought' Video

Buddy Media CEO Makes Unforgettable 'We Got Bought' Video | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
Buddy Media is not a brand most consumers would recognize, but in the halls of social media and marketing, it’s a king. It connects major brands with their customers throughout all the major social media networks. Now, thanks to a $689 million acquisition, it’s set to become part of cloud computing and CRM giant Salesforce.com (the deal should close later this summer). Still, it’s this incredible video that could make Buddy Media and its cofounder and CEO Michael Lazerow a household name.
As Lazerow explains in the text accompanying the YouTube video, the clip is raw and emotional. However, throughout it, Lazerow doesn’t speak a single word. Instead, he tells his own remarkable story and a bit about the acquisition, via a keynote slideshow on his iPad. Lazerow, who has had a life-long heart condition is smiling during most of it, but he’s also clearly wiping away a tear or two as he reacts to some of what he’s sharing.


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from Darin--worth the click to see the vid.

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DI-VE - News Details|Psychology: Brief Strategic Approach

DI-VE - News Details|Psychology: Brief Strategic Approach | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it

The brief strategic approach can be defined as the art of solving complex human problems with simple solutions.
Over the years, this approach has proven that although human problems and troubles can be extremely persistent and complicated, they do not necessarily require equally long and complicated solutions.

Brief strategic approach is a problem-solving model that looks out for reducers of complexity that can lead individuals, teams and organisations out of their seemingly-no-way-out situations. According to architect Dr Koichi Kawana, "simplicity means the achievement of maximum effect with minimum means".

This advanced problem-solving model, which actually started off back in the 1950s at the Mental Research Institute (MRI) in Palo Alto, California in the US to deal with intimidating human problems, proves highly effective and efficient when applied to companies and organisations that are often faced by extremely challenging situations.


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Social media in schools: Should teachers and students be Facebook friends?

Social media in schools: Should teachers and students be Facebook friends? | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
There seems to be one irrefutable rule about social media in schools: Teachers and students should never, never be Facebook friends.
But, in the ever-changing world of electronic media, educators and even students are struggling to sort out how to use websites, Twitter and email as a teaching tool without crossing the line into the inappropriate.
Some school committees have policies of varying strictness, while others have delayed implementing anything out of fears that rules will be obsolete in months or they will be too strict and violate employees' or students' rights.
Many say they must also rely on teachers to use professional judgment when embarking on the world of electronic communications.


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from Darin--An ongoing debate in education is when and how to use social media. Many contend it should not be used at all. I disagree heartily.

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Here's The Secret To Gaining Power At Google

Here's The Secret To Gaining Power At Google | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
We spent an afternoon last week texting back and forth with a high-powered tech exec who has been very close to Google for the past decade.
Here's something we learned: The best way to gain power at Google seems to be to go out and get a big job offer from a hot startup and then get a counter-offer from Google.
Our source says this has happenned in three instances lately.
We were unable to confirm these instances with other sources, so you should read the following as rumors and scuttlebutt:


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Check Out These 11 Awesome Google Chrome Apps

Check Out These 11 Awesome Google Chrome Apps | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it

Google's Chrome Web browser is now the Web's second most popular browser.

One of the reasons for its success is its ability to use apps, small pieces of software that add to its abilities.
Here are 11 of our favorites.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/check-out-these-11-awesome-google-chrome-apps-2012-6#ixzz1wgDOxcVp

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FOR BEGINNERS: You Should Know This Basic Trick Using Your iPad Buttons

FOR BEGINNERS: You Should Know This Basic Trick Using Your iPad Buttons | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it
Maybe you wanna show off your 100-point turn in Words With Friends, or maybe you just want to share a funny message your friend sent you last night.
Watch the video below to find out how you can take a screenshot on your iPad:


Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-take-a-screenshot-on-your-ipad-2012-5#ixzz1wY71WbJa
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The Sound of Silence | Psychology Today

The Sound of Silence | Psychology Today | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it

Lidell Simpson likes to say that though he's deaf, he's never known a day of silence in his life. His "inner" synesthetic hearing sounds something like a techno dance song and he works to recreate the sounds so that other people can hear what he does. This southern gentleman, who hails from Mississippi, was so misunderstood as a child doctors first recommended he be institutionalized. His mother wouldn't allow it and now he not only speaks several languages but contributes to our understanding of synesthesia with his own research. This is our Q&A.
1. When did you first notice your synesthesia?

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Why CIOs like Big Data and Social Media more than Customer ...

Why CIOs like Big Data and Social Media more than Customer ... | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it

Seriously: Social media monitoring? Big Data analytics? Wozu hast du mir den Kopf verdreht? (ooooph – says grandma Anna) – Just get the basics right and you would not need to go nuts with any of this stuff. Here is a funny, though not funny, example of working on the wrong stuff – that cost me US$300 to tell: I accrued enough reward points with my (Elite!!) credit card carrier to take four family and friends on vacation this August. No blackout dates! Whoopee! That is more than great. I found the tickets, booked the flights via my Card company’s website, and received email confirmation. All was right with the world.

But then. Email update number one from the airline arrives. But the message is from a third party on behalf of the airline, and it is not the airline operating the plane, but another airline DBA (“doing business as” for non-english natives) the airline, and the equipment for the DBA comes from another airline entirely. Do you see any potential for trouble here?

Email update #1. Slight change in itinerary/time.

two weeks later:
Email update #2. Ominous. Slight change in itinerary/time. Just 12 minutes different time or departure in NY.
Email update #3. Slight change in itinerary/time. This arrived three weeks after update #2.
Email update #4. Slight change in itinerary/time. Two weeks later, another ‘cosmetic’ change.
Email update #5. Slight change in itinerary/time. More changes. Vacation party feeling fragile. Maybe I stop telling them about the updates.

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The fallacy of collaboration technology - InfoWorld

The fallacy of collaboration technology - InfoWorld | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it

Sometimes, the future won't go away, even though it also doesn't actually transpire. Case in point: I've been a technology writer and editor for nearly 30 years and have yet to see the promised utopia of collaborative computing. This is the same future that envisioned flying cars and undersea cities, mind you. Just as those don't exist, neither does the virtual collaboration vision in which we're all videoconferencing from anywhere while working on the same documents and projects together in real time.

Many of the technologies needed to support that vision exist, so why isn't it a reality? In fact, we've seen the failure of two high-profile versions of this future in the ignoble deaths of the Avaya Flare and Cisco Cius videoconferencing tablets. Additionally, despite the universality of cameras in laptops, their rare use in business for videconferencing shows it's not just exorbitant infrastructure costs that doomed the Avaya and Cisco tablets.

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Social Media Marketing: Trust Is Key To Any Sale

Social Media Marketing: Trust Is Key To Any Sale | ZipMinis: Science of Blogging | Scoop.it

Regardless if you are an online marketer, or a brick and mortar establishment, you aren’t going to sell anything if you haven’t gained the trust of your customers. Trust that they are getting the best product, the most choices and an uncompromising level of customer service after the sale. If you are using social media marketing correctly, you will be able to instill a level of trust in your customers faster than when compared to traditional forms of advertising. Yes, Radio, TV and Print can make you a household name, but it doesn’t guarantee that you have achieved a level of trust that will result in any type of sale.

This is where social media marketing takes up where traditional advertising simply cannot go. When your business joins in on the conversation, IE. having and effectively using a social media platform to build relationships as opposed to retailing, you are going to build trust. It really is that simple. Not only do consumers now have a tool to rate you on your performance and value, you also have the same tool to interact and prove your worth.
According to searchengineland.com

It is through understanding the variables of trust and credibility, no matter the network, that you can begin to think of your relationships as highly credible sources of relevance. Additionally, the relationship is becoming the medium, and your brand assets can be thought of as signals that are carried over these relationships.

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