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Scooped by Martin (Marty) Smith
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Cool Tools of the Week by Robin Good

Cool Tools of the Week by Robin Good | Social Marketing Revolution | Scoop.it

Weekly Cool Tools from The Tool Guy
If you've never followed or read Robin Good's tool reviews they are works of art. Robin is the best "tool guy" on the planet. Robin has started sending out a weekly Tools of the Week email. Here are his selections for this week:

1) Mobile Visitors Insta-check
http://mobileratio.com/
 
2) Google Mobile Compatibility Rating
3) Free Live Chat
 
4) Save & Organize
 

5) Cloud Storage Cost Comparisons
https://cloudvertical.com/


Foll @Robin Goodand subscribe to his Tech Tool Roundup (couldn't find the link to encourage subscription, so Robin if you read this ping the link to subscribe and will include).

Sign up for Robin's Newsletter Here:
http://forms.aweber.com/form/61/518534561.htm

more...
Robin Good's comment, March 20, 6:28 PM
Thank you Marty! To sign-up for my newsletter you can send your readers here: http://forms.aweber.com/form/61/518534561.htm
Alicia Rodriguez Ruiz's comment, March 23, 2:20 PM
My pleasure
Rescooped by Martin (Marty) Smith from Curation Revolution
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Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter II [Robin Good & Scenttrail Conversaton]

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter II [Robin Good & Scenttrail Conversaton] | Social Marketing Revolution | Scoop.it

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note
If you missed I don't Like Scoop.it Links I, here's a link:
http://sco.lt/5ZrOcb

First post prompted a great note from my curator mentor coach Robin Good:

« Marty, I can't agree more. I hate it myself when I see Scoop.it links in my Twitter stream because I know that most of the time it's a lame post with next to no content leading me somewhere else.

I think this is part of the culture of Scoop.it, and the only ones that can change it significantly are those who direct and promote its editorial and marketing policy.

Until you promote a tool like Scoop.it as a tool to save time and produce more content, target it to novice content marketers, and don't moderate actively what you showcase (like Flipboard or Medium do), you can't expect a different kind of outcome. I may be wrong but this is the impression I get. What's your take Marty? »

Yes, but
I agree with Robin much more than I disagree. Points of agreement include:

Agree 80%

* Difficulty of Creating Branded Curators on Scoop.it due to little or no "SHOWCASE".
* Spam control on backs of curators.
* Difficulty of building community on Scoop.it due to the first bullet.

Disagree 20%

* Adding Google authorship signals a desire by Scoop.it to share back value of the commons making Scoop.it UNIQUE in social nets / tools.
* No commons is constructed as much as guided, influenced and moved like weather or a wave at a football game.

The disagreement 20% speaks to the highly distributed nature of any commons. When content is coming in from pirates and the navy then content cherished, featured and held up as examples creates powerful social signals.

This very TINY balancing beam is where cutators and editors of any commons must excel. Too heavy a hand and free discourse is squashed. Too light a hand and the commons (substitute community if it makes it easier to understand lol) can't find or share its spirit.

Robin is successful because he is creative, intelligent and generous. Robin's skills mean he can be successful anywhere, so finding ways to partner with Robin, giving Robin (and Michele, Jan, Karen and Brian) "jobs" or defined roles would help shore up the GOOD and so decrease chances for the BAD to run amok.

This "Showcasing" is a fine art since it too walks a fine and tiny beam between elitist and populist. When Robin hit 1M views on Scoop.it I would have been tempted to have a much bigger party (lol). The key push and pull between curators and any commons is how much value will be shared with the sharecropping contributors.

When Robin and then Ana-Christina right behind him passed a million views I would have stopped time a little to interview them, qualify their tactics and strategies and in so doing call attention to a tool capable of helping a sharecropper reach a lot of people.

For me, the third act of any commons is always "Review the Reviewer" or Brand the Curator (in Scoop.it's case). Who gets that? Red Bull gets it. I think FlipBoard does too though Robin has more experience there than me (recent innovations make me want to go back and check it out).

Tools, like life itself, aren't permanent fixtures. As Scoop.it crosses this next chasm it walks a tight rope across the Grand Canyon and competitors such as FlipBoard are generating lots of wind. The Scoopit team is smart and they must sense a pivot is upon them. Personally I want to help. In for a penny...:). Marty

 

more...
Karen Dietz's comment, August 22, 2014 2:07 PM
Right on Marty! I'm re-scooping this as a way to help that learning along about how to really use Scoop.it well and leverage it.
Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 22, 2014 2:25 PM

FYI Folks -- I trust that the reviews I write about the articles I curate help people along in their business storytelling journey. I know that there are many curators out there who do not add reviews/comments to the articles they highlight. 


As a result, Scoop.it and other curation sites are getting a backlash because audience members are tired of getting a link to an article that brings them to Scoop.it, and then requires another click to get to the article. Now I know that is annoying. And there is nothing of value offered between clicks.


Marty's response to the original blog post is right on. Read it along with all the other comments. Truly illuminating.


Other than a rant for me, what's the value of this post to you and business storytelling?


Namely this -- no matter what medium you use -- blogging, curating, digital storytelling -- make sure you are actually adding value for your audience. Expand their knowledge, give them tools, show them how, and offer your excellent insights. The stories you share have to connect to your audience in these ways. Anything else is a waste.


All of these posts and reviews add up to telling your story in a big picture way. So thanks Marty for addressing this issue, and reminding us about principles for quality curation. I've learned a lot from both you and Robin!


Karen Dietz

Bob Connelly's comment, November 23, 2014 7:11 PM
Being new to Scoop.it, I was glad to read this. I wouldn't have thought about this...