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Is Content Curation Stealing or a Shrewd B2B Marketing Practice?

Is Content Curation Stealing or a Shrewd B2B Marketing Practice? | social media literacy | Scoop.it

This very timely article was written by Andrew Hunt, founder of Inbound Sales Network, for Business2Community.

 

It raises an issue between original Content Creators, Content Curators and people who repost these articles.

 

Commentary by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

The reason I was moved to do this commentary is because I see a wonderful opportunity to come together as a community and help shape the future of curation. Content Curation is in its infancy and there’s a lot of misunderstanding about its potential. As I see it, it’s a brilliant B2B marketing strategy for anyone who is selling a product or service if done responsibly.

 

Content Curators are providing a very valuable service for the original author and their own audiences.

 

 

Here is what ethical, responsible curators are providing for content creators:

 

1. Syndicating content and introducing it to new audiences, which is excellent PR if it is being curated by a “trusted source”

 

2. A good headline grabs the attention of a reader and gets them into the piece quickly. A curator who can tailor the headline to grab their audience will inevitably send more traffic to the original article

 

3. A curator who is skilled at adding commentary and context to the original piece also broadens the audience of the original work

 

4. Curation is one of the building blocks of collective intelligence

 

5. If a curator fully accredits both author and article, authors might have a whole new area of exposure/distribution channel that they wouldn’t have had before

 

6. People get paid to market and open up new business for brands. Curators do this free of charge while building their own audience. Each party gains. It is a new and exciting form of symbiosis in business

 

 

I know that there are people out there who are just taking people’s work. I have spent time adding commentary only to find it has been published on Facebook and other sites without giving credit to me or the original author. They use it for their own gain but I think and hope this will become more the exception as Curation matures.

 

I like many of my colleagues are building our brands and want to be known for selecting only the best content that informs and educates our audience. We want authors to want us to curate for them and feel that we’re working in concert not on opposing teams. We want them to be happy that we're taking the time to find the essence in what they’re saying and take it to a whole new audience. It is a part of our job to bring authors to the attention of people who would not otherwise know of them.

 

 

This was a Q & A at the end of the original article in Business2Community:

 

(q) How is content curation different from stealing?

 

(a) Great question! Part of the genesis of Aggregage was my experience with “curators” who would take my content, put it on a page with no link or a link that had an anchor tag that said “link” or something similar. They would change the title and URL for my post on their site. The goal of that person was to get SEO value from my content.

They also allowed commenting on their sites. The reason I would write the post is for people to find me and my content and to engage with me in conversation.

These types of curators were definitely taking away from that. Aggregage takes a very different approach. Our goal is to be THE launching point out to all the great content getting created on particular topics. We specifically do not have pages that compete with the original source. We only show snippets.

We provide full links with the original title. We don’t have commenting on our site. Basically, we are doing everything we can to get readers to go to the original source and engage with the content. Many of the participating bloggers find that we become the second biggest referral source behind Google search.

 

 

My take is that we're still in the early stages of curation and while I understand resentment to curators who do not fully attribute their work. However, it is incorrect to assume that changing headlines and URLs automatically means that people are stealing your work strictly for their own gain. That's not how this works with people who are serious about curation.

 

The end goal  and my vision is for us to build community and broaden the audience of the content producers who we promote while building a niche audience of our own who trust that we are cutting through the noise to bring them the few articles they will hopefully find relevant. My community is the authors whose work I curate, the audience I bring their work to and other curators. I appreciate and nurture each relationship equally.

 

There are so many of you who could add brilliant insights, would love to hear your thoughts.

 

Read the original article: [http://bit.ly/u89c95]

 


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janlgordon's comment, November 28, 2011 4:30 PM
@bethkanter
Would love to meet you in NY! In the meantime, let's do connect next week and start the conversation, really looking forward to it, lots to talk about:-)
Liz Wilson's comment, November 29, 2011 3:17 AM
Jan, Thank you for this commentary - I completely agree with you. I would also emphasise that a curator must (in my opinion) take responsibility for ensuring what is curated is true/honest/accurate/fair, which involves thoroughly checking the source article's credibility.

Great piece - thanks again.
janlgordon's comment, November 29, 2011 1:08 PM
@Liz Wilson
Thanks for your comments. I absolutely agree with everything you said here.
Rescooped by Karen Riggs from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Curation Tools That Help You Find Hidden Gems That Nobody Else Is Posting

Rob Diana writes: "The core of my concern is that curators need tools to find those stories that may not be as popular as others.

Otherwise, all news comes from a few select sites that are read by the masses. Obviously, this is not what we want to have happen."

 

He couldn't be more right. 

The rest of his article, dating back to November, offers good insight into what the 1% of former Google Reader was really doing and what they are looking for now that it is gone.

 

Insightful. 8/10

 

Curated and Selected by by Robin Good

 

 

Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/tCbIPj]


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janlgordon's comment, December 18, 2011 2:57 PM
Hi Robin,
This is a good one - thanks for sharing this!!
Jan
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The State of Social Marketing 2011 – 2012 - Brian Solis

The State of Social Marketing 2011 – 2012 - Brian Solis | social media literacy | Scoop.it

The following report is brought to you by the Pivot Conference taking place in New York on October 15-16, 2012. You can download a full copy of the report for free by clicking here.


At the end of 2011, Social marketing stands at a profound crossroads. Some organizations are finally embracing the importance of social networks and, as a result, increasing investments in creative engagement, marketing, and service programs. Others see the future value, but lag behind in execution. At the vanguard, Social Businesses drive a virtuous cycle of discovery: Their successes in Social marketing lead to new data, which lead to insights, which lead to new and more effective programs as well as the business systems and processes necessary to improve internal and external collaboration...


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How 5 Top Fashion Facebook Pages Market on Facebook | Jeffbullas's Blog

How 5 Top Fashion Facebook Pages Market on Facebook | Jeffbullas's Blog | social media literacy | Scoop.it

Shopping is a form of entertainment for some and something to be more avoided than herpes for others.

 

Shopping brings some to tears, for the retail and fashion obsessed it is a joyous synergy and celebration of capitalism, consumerism and style.
Waiting for new designs to be launched at the favourite fashion store are waited upon by fashionistas with expectant excitement, like children waiting for Santa and his sleigh.

 

Sharing your shopping experiences was usually reserved to a chat over the phone with your girlfriends or while having a coffee or a quick liquid lunch.


Shopping has been social for a long time but now we have social networks that can enhance and accelerate that joy by being able to share in an instant with 200 friends at once on Facebook, rather having to wait for the weekend....


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6 Laws Every Blogger Needs to Obey so they Don’t Get Sued

6 Laws Every Blogger Needs to Obey so they Don’t Get Sued | social media literacy | Scoop.it

If you’re a blogger, do you know how to stay on the right side of the law? Do you know what you need to do to keep the FTC from knocking on your door or to keep from getting a dreaded cease and desist letter?


Fortunately you don’t have to be a lawyer or law scholar to understand the laws that govern blogging, particularly in the U.S. In fact, you really only have to understand six basic laws. Let me explain…

 

note: I’m not a lawyer, so do consult one if you are unsure about any blogging-related laws.

 

Law #1: Do you have to disclose paid endorsements?

 

One of the most important developments in the blogosphere when it comes to U.S. law is that bloggers must be open with the fact that they are being paid to use, promote, or review a product...


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10 Ways to Turn Your Blog into a Lead-Generation Machine

10 Ways to Turn Your Blog into a Lead-Generation Machine | social media literacy | Scoop.it

Sometimes when I hear companies talking about creating a "machine" for their lead-generation efforts, I think about Dr. Seuss. Specifically, I think about all the fantastical and imaginative machines he created in his 46 children's books--like the Super-Axe-Hacker, the Utterly Sputter and (my favorite) the Eight-Nozzled Elephant-Toted Boom Blitz, a mighty machine that rapidly fires explosive sour-cherry stones.

 

Of course in real life, businesses can't flip the switch on a Triple-Sling Jigger to instantly produce prospects. But what if you could create a kind of machine for lead generation on your own company blog, allowing it to help you continuously fill that sales funnel?

 

Blogs are a great way to increase your digital presence, making you more visible and "findable" via Google, Bing and the like. They can also be a great way to generate leads. Your blog can function as a kind of triage for your sales team, fielding and answering questions organically via the content you produce there. However, it can perform that function only if you effectively create momentum with visitors who are likely to buy, turning them from mere passersby into something more...


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34 Stunning Infographics To Understand The World Of Social Media

34 Stunning Infographics To Understand The World Of Social Media | social media literacy | Scoop.it

Smashingapps shows us how the world spends its time online.

 

Intro:

 

Infographics is a new way of showing information through graphical representation. We recently posted some interesting posts on infographics that you can also find on the net.

 

Great demonstration on how infographics can increase your understanding of the interlinking world of social media and it’s impact on the global internet users.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read more: [http://bit.ly/uuBUoq]


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11 Uncommon Blog Post Ideas for More Web Traffic

11 Uncommon Blog Post Ideas for More Web Traffic | social media literacy | Scoop.it

A really great blog post can bring a flood of visitors to your website when people who read your post share it with the world.

 

The best way to create a potentially viral blog post is to experiment with lots of different types of blog posts and to observe what has worked for other blogs.

 

Below I’m going to share 11 blog post ideas you can use to get more traffic. These ideas each came by examining popular posts from some of my favorite blogs. These posts became some of the most popular posts on some incredibly popular blogs. There’s no guarantee they’ll work the same for you, but try several of them and you might just make a breakthrough...


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Tips for Starting a New Facebook Fan Page

Tips for Starting a New Facebook Fan Page | social media literacy | Scoop.it

One of the things many people struggle with in social media are identity issues, and I am no different. Up until yesterday, my main Facebook entities included my personal profile and my fan page for Kikolani. While I love both of these, I found some problems with sharing links to posts I’ve done elsewhere. Specifically…

 

- Links I’ve posted to my personal profile lately haven’t gotten that much attention compared to plain status updates or photos.
- The fan page for this blog is focused on posts from this blog only. Fans didn’t sign up for posts from elsewhere.


So the solution was creating a new Facebook page. This page is specifically focused on my freelance writing and blogging as a whole so it can be a platform where I can share links to anything I have written anywhere...


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The Most Effective Tools To Enrich Reader Engagement On Your Site

The Most Effective Tools To Enrich Reader Engagement On Your Site | social media literacy | Scoop.it

What do we mean when talking about reader engagement? Well, in terms of blogging the first things that come to mind are comments, sharing, questions, conversion rates. To sum up we could compare reader engagement with building a community. A community where readers care about each other, where action doesn’t stop after reading the final paragraph and where exciting discussions are born. Unfortunately, good content and neat design aren’t the only factors which affect reader engagement. You need to learn to focus readers attention and start a conversation. Developing an engagement is a win-win situation. Your visitors will want to explore more and join the conversation but you, as the publisher, will be looking at higher conversion rates.

 

Gamification is a whole branch in reader engagement which brings together game mechanics and marketing to create engagement and solve problems. What do we understand with game mechanics from a web standpoint? Well, that doesn’t necessarily has to be the traditional online games as we are used to seeing them...


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jeevanand's curator insight, July 3, 2013 3:17 PM

Does outbrain really increase reader engagement? In most of the sites i hv seen Outbrain (taboolaa and similar others), they show quite unrelated and random stuff!

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How to optimize your blog’s RSS feed

How to optimize your blog’s RSS feed | social media literacy | Scoop.it

Your RSS Feed is sometimes the only way your visitors experience what you have to offer on a regular basis.


It serves to inform and entertain, but is also an essential tool for driving traffic back to your website and improving your overall search-engine ranking.

 

If all your feed does is show a poorly formatted excerpt of your posts, the hundreds of visitors who are not hitting your main site everyday will have no reason to read your content or share it with others.

 

When optimizing your RSS Feed, you have to consider the kind of content you curate. There are several reasons why you may want to use your feed to generate clicks. You may have a product, feature or art-directed element to your full site that needs exposure, or your content may be largely image-driven...


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