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Gavin Dudeney 'What is digital literacy?'

Gavin Dudeney 'What is digital literacy?' | social media literacy | Scoop.it

The latest recording from the British Council  Seminars series is about digital literacy. What is digital literacy, and what is its significance to you as a teacher?


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GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's curator insight, January 31, 2013 1:38 AM

E-learning/mobile learning, course design and emerging technology

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Telling Stories with Data – VisWeek 2011

Telling Stories with Data – VisWeek 2011 | social media literacy | Scoop.it

"Data storytelling" is all the rage on websites ranging from international news outlets, to political and economic organizations, to personal blogs. Indeed, this trend has captured the attention of those who research and work in information visualization. Scores of both aspiring and seasoned visual storytellers descended on the Telling Stories with Data workshop that we organized this year


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A collocation thesaurus concordancer that produces word clouds!

A collocation thesaurus concordancer that produces word clouds! | social media literacy | Scoop.it

The word combinations option produces a great list of collocations for the word, and what's better, if you click on the collocates, you get the kind of list that a concordancer will produce, with the expressions highlighted in context.


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5 Best Practices for Educators on Facebook

5 Best Practices for Educators on Facebook | social media literacy | Scoop.it

Facebook has been pegged as a waste of time, a classroom disruption and a bad habit that is correlated with low grades. Missouri even went so far as to ban Facebook and other social media relationships between teachers and students (the law was later repealed).

But teachers such as Reynol Junco — who recently published a study that shows certain types of Facebook use are correlated with higher GPAs — are beginning to look at ways that they can use Facebook to their advantage.


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William Kwon's comment, December 8, 2011 9:50 PM
I really enjoyed this post because it reminded me of what Facebook could be used to do to support students at risk who are too nervous to even ask questions, example through using Face book Groups. Many adminsitrators have an immediate aversion to facebook and don't see its possibilites as a learning and modertated group discussion tool.
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Broadband, Social Networks, and Mobility Have Spawned a New Kind of Learner -- THE Journal

Broadband, Social Networks, and Mobility Have Spawned a New Kind of Learner -- THE Journal | social media literacy | Scoop.it
Students are different today because of technology. Every educator knows this, of course, but this change is about much more than agile thumbs, shriveling attention spans, and OMG'd vocabularies.

 

According the Pew Research Center, the combination of widespread access to broadband Internet connectivity, the popularity of social networking, and the near ubiquity of mobile computing is producing a fundamentally new kind of learner, one that is self-directed, better equipped to capture information, more reliant on feedback from peers, more inclined to collaborate, and more oriented toward being their own "nodes of production."


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Is Mobile Video Viewing Taking Off?

Is Mobile Video Viewing Taking Off? | social media literacy | Scoop.it

In July 2010, eMarketer estimated that 23.9 million US mobile users would watch video on their devices at least monthly by the end of the year, which would represent a nearly 30% increase over estimated 2009 levels. Research from Nielsen suggests the jump may have been even larger.

According to the measurement firm’s “State of the Media: Mobile Usage Trends: Q3 and Q4 2010” report, the number of US consumers watching mobile video increased 40% year over year in Q3 and Q4 2010. That brought the total number of US mobile video viewers to just shy of 25 million by the end of the year.

Nielsen also found mobile video viewers were spending more time with the medium. Viewers ages 13 and older spent an average of 4 hours, 20 minutes per month watching mobile video during the second half of 2010, up from 3 hours, 15 minutes in Q3 2009 and 3 hours, 37 minutes in Q4 2009.


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icurate: Digital Tools for Gathering and Sharing Information

icurate: Digital Tools for Gathering and Sharing Information...

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Authority in the Age of Overload

Social media is out of beta. We’re entering the era of validation.

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Is Content Curation Stealing or a Shrewd B2B Marketing Practice?

Is Content Curation Stealing or a Shrewd B2B Marketing Practice? | social media literacy | Scoop.it

This very timely article was written by Andrew Hunt, founder of Inbound Sales Network, for Business2Community.

 

It raises an issue between original Content Creators, Content Curators and people who repost these articles.

 

Commentary by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

The reason I was moved to do this commentary is because I see a wonderful opportunity to come together as a community and help shape the future of curation. Content Curation is in its infancy and there’s a lot of misunderstanding about its potential. As I see it, it’s a brilliant B2B marketing strategy for anyone who is selling a product or service if done responsibly.

 

Content Curators are providing a very valuable service for the original author and their own audiences.

 

 

Here is what ethical, responsible curators are providing for content creators:

 

1. Syndicating content and introducing it to new audiences, which is excellent PR if it is being curated by a “trusted source”

 

2. A good headline grabs the attention of a reader and gets them into the piece quickly. A curator who can tailor the headline to grab their audience will inevitably send more traffic to the original article

 

3. A curator who is skilled at adding commentary and context to the original piece also broadens the audience of the original work

 

4. Curation is one of the building blocks of collective intelligence

 

5. If a curator fully accredits both author and article, authors might have a whole new area of exposure/distribution channel that they wouldn’t have had before

 

6. People get paid to market and open up new business for brands. Curators do this free of charge while building their own audience. Each party gains. It is a new and exciting form of symbiosis in business

 

 

I know that there are people out there who are just taking people’s work. I have spent time adding commentary only to find it has been published on Facebook and other sites without giving credit to me or the original author. They use it for their own gain but I think and hope this will become more the exception as Curation matures.

 

I like many of my colleagues are building our brands and want to be known for selecting only the best content that informs and educates our audience. We want authors to want us to curate for them and feel that we’re working in concert not on opposing teams. We want them to be happy that we're taking the time to find the essence in what they’re saying and take it to a whole new audience. It is a part of our job to bring authors to the attention of people who would not otherwise know of them.

 

 

This was a Q & A at the end of the original article in Business2Community:

 

(q) How is content curation different from stealing?

 

(a) Great question! Part of the genesis of Aggregage was my experience with “curators” who would take my content, put it on a page with no link or a link that had an anchor tag that said “link” or something similar. They would change the title and URL for my post on their site. The goal of that person was to get SEO value from my content.

They also allowed commenting on their sites. The reason I would write the post is for people to find me and my content and to engage with me in conversation.

These types of curators were definitely taking away from that. Aggregage takes a very different approach. Our goal is to be THE launching point out to all the great content getting created on particular topics. We specifically do not have pages that compete with the original source. We only show snippets.

We provide full links with the original title. We don’t have commenting on our site. Basically, we are doing everything we can to get readers to go to the original source and engage with the content. Many of the participating bloggers find that we become the second biggest referral source behind Google search.

 

 

My take is that we're still in the early stages of curation and while I understand resentment to curators who do not fully attribute their work. However, it is incorrect to assume that changing headlines and URLs automatically means that people are stealing your work strictly for their own gain. That's not how this works with people who are serious about curation.

 

The end goal  and my vision is for us to build community and broaden the audience of the content producers who we promote while building a niche audience of our own who trust that we are cutting through the noise to bring them the few articles they will hopefully find relevant. My community is the authors whose work I curate, the audience I bring their work to and other curators. I appreciate and nurture each relationship equally.

 

There are so many of you who could add brilliant insights, would love to hear your thoughts.

 

Read the original article: [http://bit.ly/u89c95]

 


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janlgordon's comment, November 28, 2011 4:30 PM
@bethkanter
Would love to meet you in NY! In the meantime, let's do connect next week and start the conversation, really looking forward to it, lots to talk about:-)
Liz Wilson's comment, November 29, 2011 3:17 AM
Jan, Thank you for this commentary - I completely agree with you. I would also emphasise that a curator must (in my opinion) take responsibility for ensuring what is curated is true/honest/accurate/fair, which involves thoroughly checking the source article's credibility.

Great piece - thanks again.
janlgordon's comment, November 29, 2011 1:08 PM
@Liz Wilson
Thanks for your comments. I absolutely agree with everything you said here.
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YouTube Changes: Everything You Need To Know

YouTube Changes: Everything You Need To Know | social media literacy | Scoop.it

Aaron Biebert wrote this timely and very helpful piece on his blog 8pmWarrior about all the new changes on Youtube.

 

YouTube announced changes to channels that feature a news feed integrated with Google+, Twitter, and Facebook for videos shared on other platforms.

 

Here's an intro:

 

"I’m sharing from experience as a producer of several online shows and video productions that were created to build community and sell a product in a social savvy way".

 

Video changes the game.

 

Here’s why YouTube matters:

 

**YouTube is the #2 search engine in the world (think SEO)It is the largest video-based social network

 

**Google+ is now integrated even closer with YouTube for additional community building (more on the way)

 

**YouTube is simple to use and even offers a free video editing feature Video is perfect for the Attention Era

 

Lots of valuable "how-to" information here.

 

Aaron says:

 

"If you have any questions about the new YouTube upgrade, feel free to post the questions below, on the 8pm Warriors Facebook discussion forum, or on twitter @Biebert I'll do my best to answer or point you in the right direction".

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

See full article here: [http://bit.ly/t1lLfd]


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Aaron Biebert's comment, December 5, 2011 4:19 AM
Jan, once again...thank you for sharing my post. You are so helpful and thoughtful. I really appreciate it.

Hopefully it gets folks thinking more about video. Now's the time.
janlgordon's comment, December 5, 2011 9:48 AM
@Aaron Biebert
It's a pleasure to share your articles thank you for always posting quality information and inspiration. Yes, video is a very important part of the media/marketing mix. Would love to chat with you offline soon, let's DM and set something up.
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Tools Cannot Understand the Context of the User: Five Approaches To Content Curation

Tools Cannot Understand the Context of the User: Five Approaches To Content Curation | social media literacy | Scoop.it

According to the Romain Goday, there are five distinct approaches to content curation. They are: 

 

1. The Expert Approach: Curators
A way to obtain relevant information with a reduced level of effort is to rely on experts. 

 

2. The Crowd Approach: Popularity
Most content curation tools use a series of algorithms to determine which content is popular and make it more visible to users. 

 

3. The User Behavior Approach: Personalization
Content personalization involves using technology to accommodate the different information needs between individuals. It surfaces content that is assumed to be more relevant for a specific user. 

 

4. The Relationships Approach: Social Graph

The social graph is an increasingly used approach to curate information. 

 

5. The Patterns Approach: Emergence
This approach consists of representing the emergence of content over the Web.

 

And for each one it provides an in-depth description, pros and cons as well as example of real tools utilizing that approach.

 

He concludes with a simple but insightful point:

 

"Most of those approaches are combined by content curation tools in an attempt to increase information relevance for the users.

 

Tools cannot effectively understand the context of the user.

 

So the challenge is to reduce the noise without filtering information that could be valuable for the user.

 

Just as a reminder, it would require 413 IBM's BlueGene supercomputers to replicate the operational capabilities of the human brain. So there is no doubt that successful tools need to leverage the human abilities instead of replacing them."

 

I would additionally underline, how important it is, for those very tools that claim to cater to curators and content curation needs, to better develop their noise filtering abilities without taking away opportunities for relevant discovery, instead of trying to guess what we may prefer or want. 

 

For all content curation tools this is a urgent challenge to overcome or curators will be very soon incapable themselves of sifting through the huge quantity of news they will be receiving. 

 

(Curated by Robin Good) 


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janlgordon's comment, December 8, 2011 1:27 AM
This is a great piece Robin!
Martin Gysler's comment, December 8, 2011 4:09 AM
A great post!
Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, December 8, 2011 4:11 AM
thank you Martin!
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What Are You Going To Be? A Noise Firehose or a Focusing Lens?

What Are You Going To Be? A Noise Firehose or a Focusing Lens? | social media literacy | Scoop.it

Seth Godin latest article, entitled "the trap of social media noise", touches on one of the hot issues that boiling under the new content curation tools carnival.

 

****Are we creating and leveraging these tools to regurgitate and spit out more noise,

                                               **or**

 

****Are we working to build tools and to help others understand the value of distilling and making sense of the information wave surrounding us?

**As Seth, correctly points out;

 

**to lead the way, to challenge new ground and not for the lowest common denominator is a scary proposition.

 

Nonetheless, many a curation tool is approaching the marketplace claiming as key benefits the zero-time-to-publish, frictionless content-gathering powers, super-easy sharing to multiple social networks and seo domination. 

 

**If this isn't an invitation to create yet more noisy content, with little or no value attached to it, then I fail to see where is this true invitation and support for making intelligent and truly valuable use of these tools.

 

**The fad will soon vanish, as anyone will soon be able to clip, republish (in cool formats) and share in a matter of clicks, without needing a training on it. The ensuing noise tsunami will make it rapidly evident that it is not more content or information that we need, but humans -aided by intelligent tools- that can help others find and make sense of the information and resources out there.

 

****"...either be better at pump and dump than anyone else, get your numbers into the millions, outmass those that choose to use mass and

 

****always dance at the edge of spam (in which the number of those you offend or turn off forever keep increasing)...

 

or Relentlessly focus.

 

****Prune your message and your list and build a reputation that's worth owning and an audience that cares.

 

Only one of these strategies builds an asset of value."

 

If it's tough to read, this is your reading. 10/10

 

Curated by Robin Good covering "Content Curation World" 

 

Original article: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2011/12/the-trap-of-social-media-noise.html 


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janlgordon's comment, December 11, 2011 12:42 PM
Excellent piece, I love "prune your message and your list and build a reputation that's worth owning and an audience that cares".
Beth Kanter's comment, December 11, 2011 12:49 PM
I love that headline!
janlgordon's comment, December 11, 2011 1:41 PM
@Beth Kanter

I love this headline too but sometimes I think we might be in a "curation bubble" and although we "get it" lots of people are still trying to figure out how to translate "content curation" into actual business terms they can relate to and use.
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Social Media and the Professional Learning Community

Social Media and the Professional Learning Community | social media literacy | Scoop.it

As life grows more complex, so too does education. The role of the teacher, once essentially an autonomous, well defined position, is now vast and continually changing. It is now impossible for a teacher to be engaging in best practice unless they are part of a supportive, informed and well developed network.


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Kay Oddone's comment, November 10, 2011 5:58 PM
Thanks for sharing our blog post! I hope it is useful for your PLN!
Kay Cantwell, Education Officer, Digital Learning
ResourceLink Brisbane Catholic Education.
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17 Eye-Opening Examples of Content Visualization

17 Eye-Opening Examples of Content Visualization | social media literacy | Scoop.it
Visualized content is popping up all over the web lately, and it's no surprise.
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Teens, kindness and cruelty on social network sites

Teens, kindness and cruelty on social network sites | social media literacy | Scoop.it

Social media use has become so pervasive in the lives of American teens that having a presence on a social network site is almost synonymous with being online. Fully 95% of all teens ages 12-17 are now online and 80% of those online teens are users of social media sites. Many log on daily to their social network pages and these have become spaces where much of the social activity of teen life is echoed and amplified—in both good and bad ways.


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Twelve Ideas for Teaching with QR Codes | Edutopia

Twelve Ideas for Teaching with QR Codes | Edutopia | social media literacy | Scoop.it
Blogger and PBL specialist Andrew Miller offers an array of creative suggestions for using Quick Response codes in the classroom. (RT @betamiller: In case you missed it!

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Planned MIT Courses May Advance Front on Elite Open Education | Inside Higher Ed

Planned MIT Courses May Advance Front on Elite Open Education | Inside Higher Ed | social media literacy | Scoop.it

Forget free content repositories; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology wants to deliver “interactive” elite education to the masses, complete with credentials certifying “mastery” of MIT-grade coursework.

 

In the latest boon for the “open education” movement, the engineering mecca on Monday announced a new online learning initiative, called MITx, that will give anyone the opportunity to work through MIT course material and earn a certificate of achievement.


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Beet.TV: Media Curation Platform "Storify" Tapped by the Weather Channel

Storify, the social media curation tool was used by the Weather Channel during Hurricane Irene, says Cameron Clayton EVP for Digital in this interview with Beet.TV He explains that the network had to scramble to cover the dramatic impact Irene...

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Telling Social Stories with Storify - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Telling Social Stories with Storify - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education | social media literacy | Scoop.it

"After my post about perceptions versus reality in the classroom a few weeks ago, several folks wrote to ask about Storify. I’ve been playing around with Storify for a few months now, since the very end of its private beta, and I like the way I can weave tweets, links, videos, and other media into one coherent storyline..."


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Social Media – can you really make a profit from it?

Social Media – can you really make a profit from it? | social media literacy | Scoop.it
Blog post at Social-able : The intensive use of social media is a reality of the 21st century. To ignore this fact is disastrous for any business.
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34 Stunning Infographics To Understand The World Of Social Media

34 Stunning Infographics To Understand The World Of Social Media | social media literacy | Scoop.it

Smashingapps shows us how the world spends its time online.

 

Intro:

 

Infographics is a new way of showing information through graphical representation. We recently posted some interesting posts on infographics that you can also find on the net.

 

Great demonstration on how infographics can increase your understanding of the interlinking world of social media and it’s impact on the global internet users.

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read more: [http://bit.ly/uuBUoq]


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Content Curation - Choosing the Right Topic - What You Need To Know

Content Curation - Choosing the Right Topic - What You Need To Know | social media literacy | Scoop.it

This post was written by Sue McKittrick for Marketing to Business Executives Blog.

 

My commentary: In writing this post, Sue clearly demonstrates how to curate content effectively. She refers to Pawan Deshpande's post on Crafting the Perfect Content Curation Strategy and then takes it to another level. This is the kind of "context" that is valuable to your readers. 

 

Pawan points to three factors to consider in selection of the right topic:

 

*competitors' content strategies

*the volume of content on a subject

*audience interest

 

Sue says these three things are definitely important but some refinements are in order and she delivers the goods in this article. We may have read these things before but are we really taking it all in and applying it to our work as curators or for building our business?

 

Here's what particularly caught my attention:

 

**Think about what is compelling to your targets. What information do they need to do their jobs? Where are major changes underway that will affect their success?

 

****Look at your answers to those questions through the prism of your business, products or services.

 

****What is the storyline that connects your products or services to information needed to do their jobs

 

**or**

 

** the actions they will need to take to respond to important changes occurring in their business?

 

I love this one!

 

****Consider the issues associated with the topics under consideration.

 

**Will exploration of the issues provoke rich discussion

 

**A discerning perspective on controversial views will draw more attention and offer more opportunities for engagement.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/sS17vz]


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Infographic on how social interactions influence buying

Infographic on how social interactions influence buying | social media literacy | Scoop.it
This infographic focuses on the psychology behind how/why we buy and how social interactions influence those buying decisions.
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