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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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The Voice of Reason: Facebook Messenger has invasive permissions like MOST apps

The Voice of Reason:  Facebook Messenger has invasive permissions like MOST apps | The Social Media Learning Lab | Scoop.it
Few of us realize, or understand, the access we give to programs we use every day.

    

Via the Washington Post:  In Facebook’s defense, there are plenty of legitimate reasons for requesting these permissions. Messenger needs access to your camera, for instance, so that you can send pictures, and few people would want to confirm microphone access every time they use the app to place a call.
     

....Our collective ignorance over this whole app permissions thing probably explains the hullabaloo over Messenger. Yes, it’s potentially “insidious,” to quote Fiorella, but so are WhatsApp, Viber, MessageMe and virtually every other popular messaging app, all of which request comparably creepy permissions. 
 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I logged out of my mobile Facebook account due to video data usage.  I uninstalled Facebook Messenger too as it was just a bit too intrusive to my taste,   Now it's good to review just what you need in order for the app to work in the first place, like most apps.  It's all about the data they collect that funds the way they do business.  ~  D

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Networked or Just Worked? LinkedIn’s Shiny, New Endorsements Buttons

Networked or Just Worked?  LinkedIn’s Shiny, New Endorsements Buttons | The Social Media Learning Lab | Scoop.it

"You may have seen the shiny, new skills endorsement tools on LinkedIn.  Is endorsing a useful enhancement or a troublesome distraction?"


As a curator of tech topics in social media, this is one of my own posts with input from social media specialists on what they think of LinkedIn's new endorsements function.


Excerpts, Pros & Cons


PROS:


It’s EASY.   It takes mere seconds to endorse one or more of your contact’s particular skills pulled from your contact’s profile. 


It RENEWS connections.   This could be a great way to affirm good things you know to be true from working with those well-known colleagues, clients and other contacts.


Cons:

It might be TOO easy.  – The temptation may be to use the endorse function with those you met only briefly. 


Gaming for Influence via Junk Profiles:  Forbes Blogger, Pam Moore, writes:


  • Endorsements are of course good, when they mean something.


  • She describes her dismay when staff from  her team searched those claiming bragging rights for their social search ranking on LinkedIn via Twitter, and says that they were, “honestly shocked with the result.”



See my full post here via  Networked or Just Worked on LinkedIn?

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3 Surprising Social Media Statistics That Will Make You Rethink Your Social Strategy | Fast Company

3 Surprising Social Media Statistics That Will Make You Rethink Your Social Strategy | Fast Company | The Social Media Learning Lab | Scoop.it

The most surprising social media statistics from 2013.  

   
Excerpted from a list of 10 from Fast Company:

     

1. THE FASTEST GROWING DEMOGRAPHIC ON TWITTER IS THE 55–64 YEAR AGE BRACKET.
     

  • This demographic has grown 79% since 2012.
  • The 45–54 year age bracket is the fastest growing demographic on both Facebook and Google+.
  • For Facebook, this group has jumped 46%.
  • For Google+, 56%.

       

___________________
   
Rethink it: If you’re hoping to get people involved, think about which platforms are best for that. 

   

___________________



2. 189 MILLION OF FACEBOOK’S USERS ARE "MOBILE ONLY"  

Mobile use generates 30% of Facebook’s ad revenue as well. This is a 7% increase from the end of 2012 already.

          

6. LINKEDIN HAS A LOWER PERCENTAGE OF ACTIVE USERS THAN PINTEREST, GOOGLE+, TWITTER AND FACEBOOK
    

Although LinkedIn is gathering new users at a fast rate, the number of active users is lower than most of the biggest social networks around. So more people are signing up, but they’re not participating.


This means you’re probably not going to have as good a response with participatory content on LinkedIn, like contests or polls, as you might on Facebook or Twitter.


Rethink it: If you’re hoping to get people involved, think about which platforms are best for that. ...Twitter and Facebook....might be a better place for your contest or survey, while passive content like blog posts or slide decks might be just right for your LinkedIn audience.


Read more here:


   

Related posts & tools by Deb:

      


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

As social media continues to become mainstream, articles like this zoom to the top of popularity charts.  Fast Company reports that this article was one of the "most-read leadership articles of 2013."  

That it is really about social media techmology is intriguing or an editor's mistake. ~  Deb 

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Privacy Practices: How to Muddy Your Tracks on the Internet, The New York Times

Privacy Practices:  How to Muddy Your Tracks on the Internet,  The New York Times | The Social Media Learning Lab | Scoop.it

"No Romulan cloaking device (or Harry Potter invisibility cloak) for your digital footprint, including email? The Times shares easy & many free ways to create less of a lighted trail."


Sharing on FBook, Google+ and ScooptIt. Heh.  


That said, I'd also say there's a balance of getting lots of services for free (Gmail, Google Search, Google Apps, tailored results) vs. the tradeoffs mentioned here.    Some say it's cool, not creepy.   Others, as here, say it is creepy, and NOT cool.   Here's a perspective to add to your digital learning landscape.   ~  Deb


Excerpted:


It’s probably impossible to cloak your online activities fully, but there are steps you can take to make them harder to follow.

...

There are no secrets online. ...while it’s probably impossible to cloak your online activities fully, you can take steps, [some] quite easy and many are free.


The trick is to find the right balance between cost, convenience and privacy.


...security experts and privacy advocates said more worrisome were Internet service providers, search engine operators, e-mail suppliers and Web site administrators — particularly if a single entity acts in more than one capacity, like Google, Yahoo, Facebook and AOL. This means they can easily collect and cross-reference your data, that is, match your e-mails with your browsing history, as well as figure out your location and identify all the devices you use to connect to the Internet.


“The worst part is they sell this extremely creepy intrusion as a great boon to your life because they can tailor services to your needs,” said Paul Ohm, an associate professor at the University of Colorado Law School in Boulder who specializes in information privacy and computer crime.


He advised logging off sites like Google and Facebook as soon as practicably possible and not using the same provider for multiple functions if you can help it.


“If you search on Google, maybe you don’t want to use Gmail for your e-mail,” he said.    ...But even with your own mail server, Google will still have the e-mails you exchange with friends or colleagues with Gmail accounts, said Peter Eckersley of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a digital rights advocacy group in San Francisco. “You’re less exposed,” he said. “But you can’t totally escape.”

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