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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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The Sad Tales of Public Shaming, Bullying and Ignominy in Social Media

The Sad Tales of Public Shaming, Bullying and Ignominy in Social Media | The Social Media Learning Lab | Scoop.it

"Sacco’s Twitter feed had become a horror show."


Sacco’s tweet had become not just an ideological crusade against her perceived bigotry but also a form of idle entertainment. ....As Sacco’s flight traversed the length of Africa, a hashtag began to trend worldwide: #HasJustineLandedYet.  ...Come on, Twitter! I’d like pictures #HasJustineLandedYet.”

           

"...shaming ...gained momentum in 1787, when Benjamin Rush, a physician in Philadelphia and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, wrote a paper calling for its demise  the stocks, the pillory, the whipping post, the lot. “Ignominy is universally acknowledged to be a worse punishment than death,” he wrote. “It would seem strange that ignominy should ever have been adopted as a milder punishment than death, did we not know that the human mind seldom arrives at truth upon any subject till it has first reached the extremity of error.”

   

I found no evidence that punitive shaming fell out of fashion as a result of newfound anonymity. But I did find plenty of people from centuries past bemoaning the outsize cruelty of the practice, warning that well-meaning people, in a crowd, often take punishment too far.

     

....Social media is so perfectly designed to manipulate our desire for approval, and that is what led to [Sacco's] undoing. Her tormentors were instantly congratulated as they took Sacco down, bit by bit, and so they continued to do so. Their motivation was much the same as Sacco’s own — a bid for the attention of strangers — as she milled about Heathrow, hoping to amuse people she couldn’t see.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I remember these stories.  Many of us do.  We may not realized how the power of social media can end up being today's version of inhumane tarring and feathering another person and ruining a human being's life and affecting his or her family.
    
This story gives a wider perspective than is normally seen, including the authors own participation in the lure of judgement online.  ~  Deb

#shaming #bullying #judging #socialmediamob

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Missy Mullen Caulk's comment, February 13, 2015 7:43 AM
Deb, I saw this on a lot of blogs when people were not happy with Brady Hoke, it made me sick. People hid behind multiple screen names and just tarred and feathered him.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, February 16, 2015 12:32 PM
Missy, there is such mob behavior that can happen online and football and sports (think soccer parents, the stereotypes) are not immune. I'm all for owning your social media behavior, but that does not apply to trolls and the kind of bullying, anti-social and harmful behavior described here.
Missy Mullen Caulk's comment, February 17, 2015 10:59 AM
That is one reason I have #respect for John Bacon he makes you use your correct name. It will never happen across the board but I think folks should say things they are NOT willing to put their name behind.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest – Are You Sharing Too Much Online? [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter

Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest – Are You Sharing Too Much Online? [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter | The Social Media Learning Lab | Scoop.it
Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest – Are You Sharing Too Much Online?


Do NOT publicize your DATE or PLACE of BIRTH friends.


Just because it is easy to share information doesn't mean you should.  If you see any of those Facebook or other social media status games asking for ANY security information, do not play along and do not forward it to your friends. It's not a game, it's a hacking identity theft business at work. ~  Deb


Excepted from the article & infographic:


It pays to remember that with social media you’re always on camera, and anything you say or do can be used against you.


This infographic from Trend Micro takes a closer look at the risks of posting too much information (TMI) to social networks.

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