Social Media and ...
Follow
Find
3.6K views | +0 today
Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation
Program evaluation and research of social media strategies in healthcare
Curated by bacigalupe
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

Back Issues ACI – Applied Clinical Informatics

Back Issues ACI – Applied Clinical Informatics | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
ACI: Applied Clinical Informatics - Official eJournal of IMIA and AMDIS
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

8 of the Best Tools to Understand Your Social Media Traffic

8 of the Best Tools to Understand Your Social Media Traffic | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
Monitoring traffic is almost just as important as generating it, and I’ve touched on the subject in the past as well.
bacigalupe's insight:

Read the original post here: 8 of the Best Tools to Understand Your Social Media Traffic http://windmillnetworking.com/2013/04/17/8-of-the-best-tools-to-understand-your-social-media-traffic/#ixzz2QwarYStr ;
This content is copyrighted and illegal copy of it without explicit permission is not permitted. 
Follow us: @msocialbusiness on Twitter | maximizesocialbusiness on Facebook

Monitoring traffic is almost just as important as generating it, and I’ve touched on the subject in the past as well. However, I thought it would be a good idea to revisit this subject and not only take a look at a different angle but also make a list of all the best tools to use to monitor your social media traffic.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

The Smartphone Physical: The evolution of the checkup | TEDMED Blog

The Smartphone Physical: The evolution of the checkup | TEDMED Blog | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
bacigalupe's insight:

Imagine a comprehensive, clinically relevant well-patient checkup using only smartphone-based devices. The data is immediately readable and fully uploadable to an electronic health record. The patient understands – and even participates – in the interaction far beyond faking a cough and gulping a deep breath.

For real?

Johns Hopkins medical student and Medgadget editor Shiv Gaglani says it is not only possible, but may in fact be the checkup of the future. Gaglani and a team of current and future physicians will do a first-of-its kind large-scale demo of a “smartphone physical” for hundreds of attendees at TEDMED 2013.

The checkup, which uses a unique combination of smartphone-powered devices, will capture quantitative and qualitative data, ranging from simple readings of weight and blood pressure to more complex readings such as heart rhythm strips and optic discs. Measurements and instruments will include:

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

Twitter Community #BCSM Expands Online To Broaden Patient Engagement - Forbes

Twitter Community #BCSM Expands Online To Broaden Patient Engagement - Forbes | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
Last week, the ongoing twitter conversation under the hashtag #BCSM officially expanded online in support of the global breast cancer community. The new website is here: http://www.bcsmcommunity.org – and there's a companion YouTube Channel here.
bacigalupe's insight:

 

Last week, the ongoing twitter conversation under the hashtag #BCSM officially expanded online in support of the global breast cancer community. The new website is here: http://www.bcsmcommunity.org – and there’s a companion YouTube Channel here. The hashtag itself stands for Breast Cancer Social Media – and the first online community “chat” using the #BCSM hashtag was on July 4th, 2011. Websites aren’t normally all that newsworthy anymore, but the evolution here most definitely is. The more traditional trajectory, of course, is to start with a website and then add a “twitter handle” as a way to expand an audience or community reach. Among the many amazing powers of twitter, it seems, is the ability to reverse that model. At least that’s been the trajectory for #BCSM.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

The best digital health app is conversation

The best digital health app is conversation | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
Although our attention may be distracted from time to time by a health-related smartphone or tablet app, a health tracking device, a quantified self peripheral, or some other piece of shiny, soon-t...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

The Smartphone Physical: The evolution of the checkup | TEDMED Blog

The Smartphone Physical: The evolution of the checkup | TEDMED Blog | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
bacigalupe's insight:

Imagine a comprehensive, clinically relevant well-patient checkup using only smartphone-based devices. The data is immediately readable and fully uploadable to an electronic health record. The patient understands – and even participates – in the interaction far beyond faking a cough and gulping a deep breath.

For real?

Johns Hopkins medical student and Medgadget editor Shiv Gaglani says it is not only possible, but may in fact be the checkup of the future. Gaglani and a team of current and future physicians will do a first-of-its kind large-scale demo of a “smartphone physical” for hundreds of attendees at TEDMED 2013.

The checkup, which uses a unique combination of smartphone-powered devices, will capture quantitative and qualitative data, ranging from simple readings of weight and blood pressure to more complex readings such as heart rhythm strips and optic discs. Measurements and instruments will include:

• Body analysis using an iHealth Scale.

• Blood pressure reading using a Withings BP Monitor.

• Oxygen saturation/pulse measured simultaneously with blood pressure, using an Masimo iSpO2 placed on the left ring finger.

• Visual acuity via an EyeNetra phone case.

• Optic disc visualization using a Welch Allyn iExaminer case attached to a PanOptic Ophthalmoscope.

• Ear drum visualization with a CellScope phone case.

• Lung function using a SpiroSmart Spirometer app to conduct a respirometer test.

•Heart electrophysiology using the AliveCor Heart Monitor.

•Body sounds: A digital stethoscope from ThinkLabs auscultates and amplifies the sounds of a patients lungs and heart.

• Carotid artery visualization using a Mobisante probe.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

CommunicateHealth at the 2013 Healthcare Experience Design Conference - CommunicateHealth | CommunicateHealth

CommunicateHealth at the 2013 Healthcare Experience Design Conference - CommunicateHealth | CommunicateHealth | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
Last week, Sandy, Ana and I joined hundreds of other designers, user experience experts, and patient advocates at the Healthcare Experience Design Conference.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

The General Medical Council muzzles British doctors who want to post anonymously

The General Medical Council in Britain released new guidelines on social media for medicine. Essentially, if you are a doctor in the United Kingdom Big Brother the GMC does not believe that you sho...
bacigalupe's insight:

The General Medical Council in Britain released new guidelines on social media for medicine. Essentially, if you are a doctor in the United Kingdom Big Brother the GMC does not believe that you should be able to tweet/blog/post anonymously if you self-identify as a physician. The exact wording is as follows:

If you identify yourself as a doctor in publicly accessible social media, you should also identify yourself by name. Any material written by authors who represent themselves as doctors is likely to be taken on trust and may reasonably be taken to represent the views of the profession more widely.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

Patient Translations

Patient Translations | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
bacigalupe's insight:

The first time you become a patient you join a tribe while remaining always and forever unique.

Patient Translations is a multi-faceted audio and visual artwork about the experience of being a patient, supporting a patient, or managing health. It is made by artists Halsey Burgund and Kelly Sherman from voices contributed by the public about their personal experiences.

This site is a tool that lets you contribute your voice to the artwork, as well as listen to the artwork’s evolving audio collage of music and voices. You will need a flash enabled browser and a microphone to add a story to this site.

Stories can also be added via the iOS application.

Patient Translations is generously sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Mad*Pow, BostonCHI and John Snow, Inc (JSI). It was initially developed for the 2013 Healthcare Experience Design Conference in Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

Equity in the Digital Age: How Health Information Technology Can Reduce Disparities | IssueLab

bacigalupe's insight:
Equity in the Digital Age: How Health Information Technology Can Reduce DisparitiesFeb 14, 2013
Publisher(s): Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum; California Pan-Ethnic Health Network; Consumers Union; National Council of La Raza
Issue Area(s): Computers and Technology; Health
Geographic Focus: North America-United States Download nowWhile enormous medical and technological advancements have been made over the last century, it is only very recently that there have been similar rates of development in the field of health information technology (HIT).

This report examines some of the advancements in HIT and its potential to shape the future health care experiences of consumers. Combined with better data collection, HIT offers signi?cant opportunities to improve access to care, enhance health care quality, and create targeted strategies that help promote health equity. We must also keep in mind that technology gaps exist, particularly among communities of color, immigrants, and people who do not speak English well. HIT implementation must be done in a manner that responds to the needs of all populations to make sure that it enhances access, facilitates enrollment, and improves quality in a way that does not exacerbate existing health disparities for the most marginalized and underserved.

- See more at: http://www.issuelab.org/resource/equity_in_the_digital_age#sthash.YMNJvMR9.joQ7rMJ9.dpuf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

Teens and Technology 2013 | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

Smartphone adoption among teens has increased substantially and mobile access to the internet is pervasive. One in four teens are “cell-mostly” internet users, who say they mostly go online using their phone.
bacigalupe's insight:

Smartphone adoption among American teens has increased substantially and mobile access to the internet is pervasive. One in four teens are “cell-mostly” internet users, who say they mostly go online using their phone and not using some other device such as a desktop or laptop computer.

These are among the new findings from a nationally representative Pew Research Center survey that explored technology use among 802 youth ages 12-17 and their parents. Key findings include:

78% of teens now have a cell phone, and almost half (47%) of them own smartphones. That translates into 37% of all teens who have smartphones, up from just 23% in 2011.23% of teens have a tablet computer, a level comparable to the general adult population.95% of teens use the internet.93% of teens have a computer or have access to one at home. Seven in ten (71%) teens with home computer access say the laptop or desktop they use most often is one they share with other family members.

“The nature of teens’ internet use has transformed dramatically — from stationary connections tied to shared desktops in the home to always-on connections that move with them throughout the day,” said Mary Madden, Senior Researcher for the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project and co-author of the report. “In many ways, teens represent the leading edge of mobile connectivity, and the patterns of their technology use often signal future changes in the adult population.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

The commons of health knowledge - 13 predictions for 2013 - Nesta

The commons of health knowledge - 13 predictions for 2013 - Nesta | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
bacigalupe's insight:

Big data has been big news in 2012. This year has seen a plethora of new apps, platforms and sensors that help create and capture more data about many aspects of our lives - from fitness and diet to energy consumption and retail. Advances in computer science and digital tools are rapidly improving our ability to analyse a greater volume, variety and velocity of data. Culturally, the shift towards much greater openness has had a significant impact on the public sector with more and more agencies opening up their data sets.Research shows that businesses are increasingly using data analytics to guide their innovation strategies.  

How will this affect how we create and use knowledge about our health? How could we get better at mobilising knowledge held by all of the different people involved in improving health - including doctors and nurses, community health workers, pharmacists, researchers, businesses, patients, families and carers - and make this knowledge widely accessible?  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

TEDMED doodle: Protecting the patient's pearls

TEDMED doodle: Protecting the patient's pearls | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
Amy Abernethy spoke from the TEDMED stage earlier this week, and from reports from friends in the audience, she was great. Here's how Dean Meyers of Discovery Doodles (discoverydoodles.com) capture...
bacigalupe's insight:

Amy Abernethy spoke from the TEDMED stage earlier this week, and from reports from friends in the audience, she was great.

Here’s how Dean Meyers of Discovery Doodles (discoverydoodles.com) captured the highlights of her talk (which will be available for viewing at tedmed.com in the future).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

Eric Dishman: Health care should be a team sport | Video on TED.com

When Eric Dishman was in college, doctors told him he had 2 to 3 years to live. That was a long time ago.
bacigalupe's insight:

When Eric Dishman was in college, doctors told him he had 2 to 3 years to live. That was a long time ago. Now, Dishman puts his experience and his expertise as a medical tech specialist together to suggest a bold idea for reinventing health care -- by putting the patient at the center of a treatment team. (Filmed at TED@Intel)

Eric Dishman does health care research for Intel -- studying how new technology can solve big problems in the system for the sick, the aging and, well, all of us.Full bio »

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

Guest Post from Stacey Glaesmann – “Web Therapy Finally Evolves”

Guest Post from Stacey Glaesmann – “Web Therapy Finally Evolves” | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
I'm happy to share a guest post from Stacey today. Clients can book sessions with Stacey over the Regroup platform. If you'd like to request a time or date that you�
more...
Margarita Tarragona's curator insight, April 23, 2013 11:18 PM

Reseña de una nueva plataforma para dar terapia en línea.

Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

Think Before You Tweet, E-mail, or Post to Online Groups, Advise Physicians

Think Before You Tweet, E-mail, or Post to Online Groups, Advise Physicians | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
Physicians should pause before hitting “send” on an e-mail, tweet, or other digital communication to ensure that the communication will uphold their professional obligations to patients and not mar...
bacigalupe's insight:

Physicians should pause before hitting “send” on an e-mail, tweet, or other digital communication to ensure that the communication will uphold their professional obligations to patients and not mar the reputation of the profession, urges a new joint position paper released by the American College of Physicians (ACP) and the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB).

Questionable physician behavior online is not uncommon, suggested a 2012 study that found 92% of state medical boards had received reports of online violations of medical professionalism. The most commonly reported violations were inappropriate communication with patients (such as sexual misconduct), inappropriate medical practices such as prescribing of medications outside the physician-patient relationship, and misrepresentation of the physician’s credentials. A previous study had documented online misbehavior by medical students. But Humayun J. Chaudhry, DO, MS, SM, FSMB president and chief executive officer and one of the study’s coauthors, noted that it was a surprise to see so many licensed physicians getting into trouble online.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

The Touch-Screen Generation

The Touch-Screen Generation | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
Young children—even toddlers—are spending more and more time with digital technology. What will it mean for their development?
bacigalupe's insight:

What, really, would Maria Montessori have made of this scene? The 30 or so children here were not down at the shore poking their fingers in the sand or running them along mossy stones or digging for hermit crabs. Instead they were all inside, alone or in groups of two or three, their faces a few inches from a screen, their hands doing things Montessori surely did not imagine. A couple of 3-year-old girls were leaning against a pair of French doors, reading an interactive story called Ten Giggly Gorillas and fighting over which ape to tickle next. A boy in a nearby corner had turned his fingertip into a red marker to draw an ugly picture of his older brother. On an old oak table at the front of the room, a giant stuffed Angry Bird beckoned the children to come and test out tablets loaded with dozens of new apps. Some of the chairs had pillows strapped to them, since an 18-month-old might not otherwise be able to reach the table, though she’d know how to swipe once she did.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

"El potencial de las TICs y la Web 2.0 para la promoción de la salud" by Gisel Fontanet

La web 2.0 y la Educación para la salud (EpS) comparten muchos elementos comunes en sus respectivas conceptualizaciones como: la Inteligencia colectiva (más allá del experto único); el Compartir (más allá de ofrecer), la Participación activa (más...
bacigalupe's insight:

El potencial de las TICs y la Web 2.0 para la promoción de la salud

 

Gisel Fontanet, Col·legi Oficial Infermeres i Infermers BarcelonaFollow

 Abstract

La web 2.0 y la Educación para la salud (EpS) comparten muchos elementos comunes en sus respectivas conceptualizaciones como: la Inteligencia colectiva (más allá del experto único); el Compartir (más allá de ofrecer), la Participación activa (más allá de la pasiva), Dialogar (más allá de comunicar) o la Continuidad (más allá de la actividad atomizada), que las transforma en dos recursos ideales y complementarios para promocionar la salud de las personas al alcance de todos los profesionales de la salud.

 Recommended Citation

Fontanet, Gisel (2013) "El potencial de las TICs y la Web 2.0 para la promoción de la salud,"Revista de Innovación Sanitaria y Atención Integrada: Vol. 5: Iss. 1, Article 1. 
Available at: http://pub.bsalut.net/risai/vol5/iss1/1

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

Appily Ever After? The Smartphone as Shrink

Appily Ever After? The Smartphone as Shrink | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
The author puts five psychology apps to the test to see if they really help her improve her and her family’s lives.
bacigalupe's insight:

But now a proliferation of psychology smartphone apps — with names likeBreakkUp, iStress andmyinstantCOACH — purports to help us live happier, less anxious lives. As Mark McGonigle, a therapist in Kansas City, Mo., who invented the app Fix a Fight, puts it: “Electronic devices don’t have to drive us apart. They can bring us together.” Which sounds so good. A few bucks and a lot of squinting into my phone: that certainly beats a $300-an-hour psychiatrist, right?

But can an algorithm iron out the kinks in our existence? Will I be able to get my kids to do their homework, or calm down, or simply get my husband to stop nagging, all by following the protocol of these apps? I decided to test them against the stressors of my own less-than-peaceful life: work, cranky husband, twin 11-year-old boys.

Over the course of two weeks, I did a lot of screen tapping — just as I used to spend hours shaking that Magic 8 Ball — and discovered the pleasures, and frustrations, of making my smartphone my shrink.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

The Diabetic's Paradox

The Diabetic's Paradox | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it
Health self-tracking is in vogue. But is it more of a boon or a burden?
bacigalupe's insight:

Asking people to monitor their own health and change behaviors according to their own data -- self-tracking -- is the premise behind a deluge of mobile apps, new wearable devices, and patient services. The practice offers lots of hope for a world where so many ills and diseases are the result of human behavior. But self-tracking isn't a panacea. I's a complicated process, and one that can easily backfire. Just ask the 26 million Americans with diabetes.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

When the Designer is a Patient: A View from the Inside

My patient experience talk from Healthcare Experience Design 2013.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by bacigalupe from Aesthetics & Space
Scoop.it!

Research Conducted Using Data Obtained through Online Communities: Ethical Implications of Methodological Limitations

Research Conducted Using Data Obtained through Online Communities: Ethical Implications of Methodological Limitations | Social Media and Healthcare Evaluation | Scoop.it

An increasing number of public/private initiatives are exploring novel ways of conducting scientific research, including the use of social media and online collection of self-reported data.
Research relying on collection of self-reported data by self-selected participants has known methodological limitations, including selection bias, information bias, and confounding.
Such limitations may mean that results and conclusions of research using data obtained through online communities need to be interpreted with caution, as further replication is often required.
The findings of research, including their potential actionability, should be communicated to participants in a way that is understandable, accurate, complete, and not misleading.
The potential for sharing participants' data with third parties as well as the commercial uses of research findings should be disclosed to participants prior to consent.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

Cyberhugs: Creating a Voice for Chronic Pain Sufferers Through Technology

bacigalupe's insight:

Chronic pain is a pervasive and expensive public health problem affecting roughly one-third of the American population. The inability of language to accurately convey pain expressions combined with the social stigmas
associated with discussing pain persuade many sufferers to remain silent about their pain. Gender politics and fear of professional repercussions further encourage silence. This article explores the need for a safe and secure
place for chronic pain sufferers to talk of their pain experiences. The extent to which digital communication technology can fulfill this need is examined. This descriptive study examines the use of one online chronic pain management workshop for its ability to create an engaged community of choice. Workshop admittance was based on participants having a qualifying chronic pain condition. A thematic discourse analysis is conducted of all entries chronic pain participants posted. In addition to goal setting, participants discuss the ways in which pain affects them on a daily basis. Two themes emerge: validation and encouragement. This study suggests that chronic pain users need a discursive space to legitimate their chronic pain identity. It confirms that online websites and virtual audiences facilitate disclosure and allow for authentic communication. The benefits of computer-mediated discussion as well as its limitations are examined

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by bacigalupe
Scoop.it!

Patient Bill of Rights for Psychotropic Medications

The pharmaceutical industry has made it very difficult to know what the clinical trial evidence is regarding psychotropics. As a consequence, primary care physi
more...
No comment yet.