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Digital Medicine: Benefits and Risks of Healthcare Social Media

Digital Medicine: Benefits and Risks of Healthcare Social Media | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it

The use of social media in healthcare represents an increasingly effective tool in healthcare. It can be used to communicate with consumers, inform about new wellness schemes, market healthcare products, provide basic healthcare advice, inform about latest medical devices, get instant public feedback and much more. At the same time, Healthcare social media also presents challenges, including risks to information accuracy, organizational reputation, and individual privacy.


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How charity leaders can get the most out of social media

How charity leaders can get the most out of social media | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it
As charities engage more with supporters on social media, what role should their leaders play?
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Healthcare’s Pinterest Strategy

Healthcare’s Pinterest Strategy | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it

It’s true that, no matter what a company’s mission is, social media platforms can enable meaningful engagement with many of its core audiences. However, it’s also true that different social media platforms offer their own ways in which the user’s message can be distributed. Tools range from image and video sharing (Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube) to social networking (Facebook, LinkedIn) to microblogging (Tumblr, Twitter).

One of the more interesting new social platforms to gain popularity, even in the healthcare industry, is Pinterest. The platform is focused around a visual dashboard for users to collect various images and links, organizing each by categorized “boards” and sharing them with others to add to their own collections. While Pinterest has recently been one of the fastest growing social platforms on the planet, it has often been viewed as a platform frequented by soccer moms and sorority girls. Despite the stereotype, Pinterest is also gaining increased popularity among healthcare organizations.  This isn’t too surprising when you consider that health-related boards are among the most common, including diet and exercise.

But healthcare organizations are finding different creative uses for this new platform based on their own individual organizational and digital strategies.  The varied uses and assumed strategic roles of healthcare-focused Pinterest accounts often represent a range between soft “audience engagement” goals and more analytics-driven SEO goals. Here are three Pinterest-using healthcare companies, each of which utilizes the platform in their own ways.

Boehringer Ingelheim

 

BI’s Pinterest account appears to be used to support the company’s overall corporate visibility and thought leadership rather than direct audience engagement. What is unique about BI’s Pinterest is that most of the images included are uploaded, rather than pinned from an external link. Some boards contain photos from recent events, while others focus on BI’s work, or serve to educate the audience on diseases which are relevant to BI’s initiatives.  Many of the images are branded, containing visual marketing from BI, with very few coming from outside sources, such as other users. 

Mayo Clinic

Unlike BI, which is primarily focused on BI-related information, Mayo’s unique approach is driven by their core audience – patients. The account features board topics that range from audience-engaging and interactive (“Healthy Recipes,” “Fitness”) to more company-focused content (“Mayo on Everest,” “In The News”). The audience-driven board topics adapt to find a middle ground between how Pinterest’s primary audience uses the platform and some of the Mayo Clinic’s primary focus areas.

Also unlike BI, the images are often pinned by sharing links to the Mayo Clinic website, rather than directly uploaded to Pinterest. This seeks to take advantage of one of the platform’s greatest strengths, driving significant referring traffic to web publishers, even more than Twitter, Reddit and YouTube.

Bayer

 

While Bayer, as an organization, is much more similar to BI than the Mayo Clinic, its Pinterest account represents somewhat of a middle ground between the two accounts – being both corporate and patient focused – including both direct uploads and pins via shared links. Bayer typically pins images by sharing links to their own websites. The company utilizes nine boards that range in focus from Bayer business initiatives and consumer campaign materials to others that more closely match the average Pinterest user’s favorite topics, like gardening and sustainability.

Unlike many pharmaceutical social media initiatives, some posts include comments from other users, to which Bayer typically responds. Through their Pinterest account, Bayer interacts with their audience without losing sight of the interactive opportunities within the platform.

With its freeform, creative nature, Pinterest may seem like an unlikely social media tool for healthcare companies. However, companies like Boehringer Ingelheim, the Mayo Clinic and Bayer have found diverse ways to utilize it. In the hands of innovative healthcare organizations, Pinterest can foster a connection with key audiences around shared interest areas, on a common platform.

 


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Joanne Basford's curator insight, June 29, 9:46 AM

Some interesting examples in here. 

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Smartphone coaching can boost diabetic management and help reduce disease risks

Smartphone coaching can boost diabetic management and help reduce disease risks | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Diabetics living in low to modest socioeconomic communities can benefit from patient coaching via smartphone when it comes to managing their disease and improving their health, according to a new study from the School of Kinesiology & Health Science at York University in Canada. Researchers conducted a six-month pilot study, involving 21 participants, in which a smartphone application intervention program using provided to patients as well as device coaching. The focus was to improve behavioral management of type 2 diabetes in ethnically-diverse populations. Of the 21 participants 12 saw their sugar levels drop with minimal changes in medication. The smartphone not only helped reduce diseasee complications but helped patients hurdle obstacles such as miscommunication and issues with attending medical care tied to travel difficulties. Study


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Apple's Healthbook: alleged first photos emerge

Apple's Healthbook: alleged first photos emerge | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it
Details and images of Apple's first foray into the booming health and fitness tracking market have been leaked to through the website 9to5Mac. Codenamed Healthbook, the future app is likely to be included with iOS 8, the next iteration of Apple's mobile operating system. 

 

According to the website's sources, Healthbook will allow users to track a multitude of different health indicators (heart rate, blood sugar, sleep, nutrition, activity, etc.), each of which can be accessed through its own "card." The entire program seems to be designed for use with next-generation health-tracking sensors.

 

The app even features an "Emergency Card," which will allow users to enter their critical information such as blood type, organ donor status, allergies and medications for doctors and emergency medical technicians in case they are unable to speak in a health emergency.


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Andrew Spong's curator insight, March 19, 2:05 PM

Tracker tools that already exist, and an ICE variant.

 

Wow... :-/

 

Let's hope the 'next-generation health-tracking sensors' don't further reduce the already sketchy battery life of the iPhone.

 

There's really not much to get excited about here.

 

And, of course, its utility is predicated upon the ability of the user to be able to acquire their health data from external sources, as well as collect their own.

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Social Conversations from Doctors 2.0 & You

Social Conversations from Doctors 2.0 & You | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it
One of the joys of having large data sets about the past is the opportunity to learn from observing patterns. And from observing patterns you may be able t

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UK begins assessment of Proteus Digital Health’s intelligent medicine platform

UK begins assessment of Proteus Digital Health’s intelligent medicine platform | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Proteus’ frame for digital medicine includes three key components: Measurement, engagement, and alignment. 

The technology in the Proteus digital medicine platform includes unique measurement tools, like sensor-enabled pills, a peel-and-stick biometric sensor patch worn on the body, and companion smartphone apps. The patch records when a pill is ingested and also tracks other things like sleep patterns and physical activity levels. The ingestible sensor component secured FDA clearance in July 2012, while the company’s sensor-laden patch got FDA clearance in 2010.


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Rising Use of Social Media in Healthcare

Rising Use of Social Media in Healthcare | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it
I came across this cool infographic made by Demi & Cooper Advertising while researching this week’s New Tech Friday post. There are some really great nuggets of information in the graphic, including the fact that 60% of physicians feel social media improves patient care and half of smartphone...

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Influence of Social Media on Health Care Industry

Research says about 60% people move towards the social media for their health related issues. Health care industry use the social media to share its messages an

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A Physicians Guide to Online Medical Communities

This guide helps you navigate tips and best practices for using online medical communities for everything from tumor boards to ecurbsides. When doctors share a

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Digital Health Innovation: Moving Toward Individualized Medicine

Digital Health Innovation: Moving Toward Individualized Medicine | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Health care and consumer technology are converging, and the resulting innovations in digital health are revolutionizing the historically conservative field of healthcare. From online doctor’s appointments to apps for organ transplants, it seems that healthcare, which represents nearly 20% of the United States’ economy, is finally undergoing a technology transformation. Digital health innovation is allowing the industry to move beyond the previously generalized treatment approaches to an era of individualized medicine with endless opportunity.

Digital health innovations cover all aspects of medicine, from the way we interact with our healthcare providers, to the accuracy of diagnosis and the efficacy of treatment. Technology allows us to touch people’s lives, both through groundbreaking innovation and spreading awareness. It opens new doors of communication and education to the consumer that were simply not available in the past.

Nothing happens in a vacuum, and the engineers, physicians and investors behind any digital health innovation need access to the population that can benefit from their product or service. Enter social media. Social media platforms are a lightning fast way to disseminate information to a large and diverse population. Given the fact that Americans spend 121 billion minutes on social networking sites per month, it is not surprising that using social media to spread news has become standard operating procedure at most companies.

We were thrilled when our implantable device to restore partial vision to the blind became ready for the general public. With approval from the FDA, we knew that we finally had the opportunity to communicate to the patients who could benefit from this approval, as well as their caretakers, with a bit more freedom. The population we work with is passionate, as is any consumer looking for a solution to their problems, and the chance to communicate with them was thrilling.

It’s a very exciting time to be involved in scientific discovery and we are thrilled to share the stories of people whose lives our device has touched. It’s a true marriage of exciting technological advances and the ability to share that news with the world.

As global citizens in the 21st century, it is just as important to be a part of the greater conversation about maximizing people’s quality of life. Consumer technology such as social platforms, mobile apps, and the internet in general, have enabled us to connect with the very people whose lives we seek to improve, as well as their families, friends, colleagues, and acquaintances. Society is more curious, engaged, informed, and technologically saturated than ever before. People want to be a part of the conversation, which can benefit all of us in terms of credibility, funding, and future innovation. It may be challenging to adapt high-tech medicine to a mainstream audience, but it is manageable if done efficiently.

 


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Social Media: A Review and Tutorial of Applications in Medicine and Health Care

Social Media: A Review and Tutorial of Applications in Medicine and Health Care | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Background: Social media are dynamic and interactive computer-mediated communication tools that have high penetration rates in the general population in high-income and middle-income countries. However, in medicine and health care, a large number of stakeholders (eg, clinicians, administrators, professional colleges, academic institutions, ministries of health, among others) are unaware of social media’s relevance, potential applications in their day-to-day activities, as well as the inherent risks and how these may be attenuated and mitigated.


Objective: We conducted a narrative review with the aim to present case studies that illustrate how, where, and why social media are being used in the medical and health care sectors.
Methods: Using a critical-interpretivist framework, we used qualitative methods to synthesize the impact and illustrate, explain, and provide contextual knowledge of the applications and potential implementations of social media in medicine and health care. Both traditional (eg, peer-reviewed) and nontraditional (eg, policies, case studies, and social media content) sources were used, in addition to an environmental scan (using Google and Bing Web searches) of resources.


Results: We reviewed, evaluated, and synthesized 76 articles, 44 websites, and 11 policies/reports. Results and case studies are presented according to 10 different categories of social media: (1) blogs (eg, WordPress), (2) microblogs (eg, Twitter), (3) social networking sites (eg, Facebook), (4) professional networking sites (eg, LinkedIn, Sermo), (5) thematic networking sites (eg, 23andMe), (6) wikis (eg, Wikipedia), (7) mashups (eg, HealthMap), (8) collaborative filtering sites (eg, Digg), (9) media sharing sites (eg, YouTube, Slideshare), and others (eg, SecondLife). Four recommendations are provided and explained for stakeholders wishing to engage with social media while attenuating risk: (1) maintain professionalism at all times, (2) be authentic, have fun, and do not be afraid, (3) ask for help, and (4) focus, grab attention, and engage.
Conclusions: The role of social media in the medical and health care sectors is far reaching, and many questions in terms of governance, ethics, professionalism, privacy, confidentiality, and information quality remain unanswered. By following the guidelines presented, professionals have a starting point to engage with social media in a safe and ethical manner. Future research will be required to understand the synergies between social media and evidence-based practice, as well as develop institutional policies that benefit patients, clinicians, public health practitioners, and industry alike.

 


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The use of social media in Healthcare

Liette Lapointe February 21, 2014 The use of social media in healthcare: From collaboration to strategy Middlesex University - Department of International M...
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Twitter 'big data' can be used to monitor HIV and drug-related behavior, study ... - Medical Xpress

Twitter 'big data' can be used to monitor HIV and drug-related behavior, study ... - Medical Xpress | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it
domain-B Twitter 'big data' can be used to monitor HIV and drug-related behavior, study ...
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Digital Opinion Leaders in Diabetes: The Worldwide HCP Social Media Study

Digital Opinion Leaders in Diabetes is the largest behavioural study ever conducted into healthcare professionals’ views on the diagnosis and management of dia…

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The digital behaviours of patients: an infographic

The digital behaviours of patients: an infographic | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it
Patient digital behaviours

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The Doctor Is Into This Medical Photo Sharing App

The Doctor Is Into This Medical Photo Sharing App | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Doctors aren’t big users of social media--their schedules don’t leave a lot of time for casual status updates, and a state-by-state patchwork of ethics rules limit what they can post and who they can friend, says Toronto critical care physician Dr. Joshua Landy.

But, Dr. Landy says, they are signing up for a specialized smartphone app called Figure 1, created by a company of the same name he cofounded. It’s a specialized photo-sharing hub for physicians and other medical professionals, letting them share photos of medical conditions for teaching and diagnostic purposes while incorporating safeguards to ensure patient privacy and consent.

"From my users' perspectives, the way that privacy gets dealt with in the app is essentially, if you can think of the phrase, the best way to keep a secret is not to have it,” Dr. Landy says.

That means doctors are prompted before they share an image to make sure they have proper consent and to delete any identifying features from their photos and captions, like patient faces, tattoos, or potentially unique facts like the dates of a hospital stay. Redacted parts of a picture are actually scrubbed from the image file, not merely obscured, he says.

"After that you submit the images, before they're released for anyone to see, they're reviewed by our privacy moderators, and then once they've been moderated or released, if anyone has any concern about any images, they can be flagged or removed immediately,” Dr. Landy says.

Dr. Landy, who as a visiting scholar at Stanford University studieddoctors’ use of mobile devices, said health care workers were already snapping and sharing pictures of patients’ medical conditions with their colleagues before Figure 1 launched about a year ago.

“But what they're not doing is saving those pieces of information: those interesting cases, those teachable moments, that sometimes happen at 4 in the morning when you're alone,” he said. "There's no current way, or there hadn't been [before Figure 1], any way to archive these great educational assets."

The company formally markets Figure 1 as an educational tool, not a diagnostic one, and, Dr. Landy says he’s seen doctors use the tool to quiz students and residents about medical conditions. About 15% of U.S. medical students use the app, estimates cofounder and CEO Gregory Levey.

Dr. Landy says Figure 1 lets doctors and other medical professionals see a wider range of cases than they might see in ordinary practice.

"There's so much just outside the usual circle of regular diagnoses,” he said. "You only learn how to make that diagnosis if you've read a case or seen that case in person."

While the site is open to any licensed medical professional, Dr. Landy says it’s definitely not intended for patients looking to self-diagnose.

"People get called out if it seems like someone's trying to hide their own medical condition as a patient's condition that they're trying to help, and I think that makes sense,” he says. “People are here in a professional environment, and they want to talk to each other and learn from each other."

But, he says, patients he’s spoken to are generally okay with doctors anonymously showing their colleagues photos of their medical conditions through the app.

"Almost every patient I've asked is interested in having the images shared as long as they're being shared in the interest of education and being able to help people who are in similar circumstances," he says. "Obviously if someone says no, that's pretty much the end of the conversation; the first principle of medical ethics is pretty much patient autonomy."

 


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Social media in healthcare report 2014

A report by IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics on the use of social media in healthcare by both patients and professionals.

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How social media facilitates peer review

How social media facilitates peer review | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Much has been written about how Web 2.0 tools can change the healthcare landscape.  It would appear a recent set of circumstances has upped the ante.

This story begins with a recent study that attempted to tackle the problem of ICU infections. ICU infections are a challenging problem, patients who are admitted to the ICU are at risk of worsening illness and death from infections such as MRSA which can be acquired while in the ICU setting. To counteract this risk, current practice is the performance of surveillance cultures on people who are admitted to intensive care. If the person tests positive for certain infections they are placed in isolation (and health care providers are asked to wear silly gowns and share a useless stethoscope).

 

The success of this strategy is dubious, ranging from successful in some studies to nearly useless in others. Based upon my personal observations of my own hospital’s isolation practices, my only conclusion has been that yellow is not a good look for me.

But I digress. In this study, patients underwent “universal decontamination” with chlorhexidine, a commonly used antiseptic. The study found a dramatic drop in the numbers of MRSA infections and bloodstream infections. The study was peer reviewed and published in the flagship of medical publishing, the New England Journal of Medicine.

The results were so impressive in fact, that the accompanying editorial in the same issue was titled “Screening Inpatients for MRSA — Case Closed.”  The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality even advised on its website that hospitals begin implementing universal decontamination.

And why wouldn’t they? The 44% drop in ICU bloodstream infections resulted in a number needed to treat of 54, didn’t it?

Um, well, about those numbers …

An online journal club discussion found that the numbers didn’t quite add up.  The discussion was taken over to the Intensive Care Network, a relatively small blog in the outer rings of the healthcare galaxy, light years from the central galactic location of the mighty Journal. Their online community was called to look at the studies calculations and issued the following challenge:

PLEASE have a go and see if you can match their NNT’s.

IF you can’t there is a serious problem, with practice changing implications.

When none of them could get the numbers to add up, they contacted the study’s lead author.

Dr. Huang responded, and found the same problem as the rest of the community: There was an error in the calculations. As a result, the NNT increased from 54 patients to prevent one bloodstream infection to 99. Still encouraging, to be sure. But not nearly as impactful as the original results would suggest.

This story makes me excited about the power of Web 2.0 tools, in particular social media sites that allow for rapid interactions between researchers and clinical providers so that they can exchange information in real time. In this case, the combination of the traditional journal club combined with Web 2.0 tools effectively lead to the crowdsourcing of the usual peer review process. By turning the usual peer review process on its head, trusted information that was potentially practice changing but factually erroneous was corrected so that practicing clinicians could make decisions based on good data.

I don’t foresee that social media tools tools like blogs and crowdsourcing will ever replace the current process of academic peer review. But perhaps by replacing the one way exchange of information between researchers and clinicians with a two-way exchange of information between them, we can make the process better.

And if that results in me no longer  having to wear those ridiculous looking gowns, well so much the better.

 


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The future of mobile technology: less phone, more operating system

The future of mobile technology: less phone, more operating system | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it
After all, recent history has shown that the “revolutionary” 64-bit chip in Apple’s iPhone 5S has generated less than 1 percent of real value.

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Health apps: where do they make sense? A patient opinion-informed white paper

Health apps: where do they make sense? A patient opinion-informed white paper | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Conclusions of the first ever cross-stakeholder, pan-european seminar on health apps, held at the King's Fund on 28 October 2013.

 

Direct download from Alex Wyke's blog: https://www.dropbox.com/s/xt6oh78wpn4b1ef/MASTER%20A4%20WHITE%20PAPER%20PDF.pdf

 

The five key messages:

 

1. Overhauling healthcare systems–making them patient-centric

2. Engaging doctors in the prescribing of health apps
3. Overseeing quality standards for health apps
4. Ensuring that health apps remain of a high standard throughout their lifetime
5. Considerations for policymakers wishing to oversee health apps


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Andrew Spong's curator insight, March 18, 5:17 AM

My POV:

 

1. Lip-service has been given to this idea since time immemorial, but there are few examples of such change having not only been instantiated, but maintained, and used to drive strategic direction. This is a systemic problem which I don't think will be resolved until we accept that 'reskinning' existing structures is inadequate to the needs of truly patient-centred healthcare design.

 

2. Unenforceable, but necessary. A paradox that may only be resolved through cross-constituency digital peer-review (imagine the degree of insight and involvement if there were a '#FOAMed meets #bcsm' for every disease area)

 

3. See above. 'Regulation' as we understand it will neither be viable, nor enforceable. Whether we want a 'top layer' of heavy-hitting health faculty acting as a secondary filter before content enters the App Store (Apple) and Play (Google) is another question. I'm not sure if it's even a good idea (re-replacing 'evidence with eminence' again) unless it's largely automated using a Watson-like AI with a complete picture of the existing gold standard in all evidence.

 

4. Predicated upon the expectation that they're of a high standard at launch, which simply isn't the case.. The majority of health-related content available as apps is of low quality and relevance.

 

5. Re. the first paragraph of the synopsis of this section: 'The consensus at the seminar was that the adoption of smartphone technology will not create health inequalities, but rather can increase healthcare sustainability'. I strongly agree with this line of reasoning, and feel that the 'digital divide' debate needs to be answered once and for all.

 

My answer to this last point: principally, this is a period of transition, and no plans should be made to accommodate perceived (and usually unsubstantiated) inequalities in terms of access to health information which will diminish over time -- although NB levels of health literacy are another matter. Where digital exclusion exists (and such conclusions often overlook the 'one step removed' access to digital health via family members, friends, and carers) the savings made from the efficient implementation of lower-cost digital health initiatives (and there really should be some; if there aren't, questions need to be asked about the organisation under review) should be reinvested in targeting hard-to-reach communities in an offline setting.

rob halkes's curator insight, March 18, 6:25 AM

Great Read!

Marisa Maiocchi's curator insight, March 21, 2:55 PM

Aportes y conclusiones del primer seminario pan-europeo sobre apps de salud. Muy interesante.

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5 Ways Pinterest Can Be Used for Patient Education In Healthcare

5 Ways Pinterest Can Be Used for Patient Education In Healthcare | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Pinterest is an image-driven social network that has rocketed in popularity in the last couple of years. Pinterest works as a way to visually organize things on the Internet via “Boards,” which act kind of like folders, to organize thoughts into certain categories or interests. As more and more people use the Internet to search about healthcare, Pinterest is a way to organize the information they find, also allowing for them to share content easily with others. The other potential benefit from Pinterest is to reach people when they’re in various Internet “mindsets.” It can be a way to reach the patient when they’re not necessarily concerned with a particular problem at the moment (i.e. searching for specific health information for an issue they have right now). Pinterest can provide a medium for reaching patients to remind people of the many aspects of their life in which health plays an important role.

Pinterest is a good medium for patient education because many people learn best visually. Images can help convey information that would be much harder to digest in words. It can also serve as a good reference, and is more shareable.What can Healthcare marketers do? Use Pinterest to inform patients about:1. How the body worksGiving patients a better understanding of how the body works will help them understand problems they may have and the treatments that are available. It also helps patients better identify issues to communicate with their doctor when they know where things are, how they work, and what they’re called.Pinterest for Patient Education

2. How medical procedures workWhen a patient understands how a medical procedure works they may feel more comfortable getting it done. A patient who understands the procedure is also probably less likely to be as anxious about the procedure if they know what is going to happen. Patients can also be informed of procedures or treatment options that they may not have been familiar with before.Pinterest for Patient Education

3. How medical devices workGiving people illustrations about how a medical device works can not only help patients who are currently using the device, but can also help to bring awareness to other patients who may not have known about the device. Patients who are using the device can become more familiar with how the device is actually working.Pinterest for Patient Education

4. General wellness and maintaining good healthPinterest for Patient EducationPinterest is a good way to give patients reminders about how to take care of their health in general. Visuals can serve as reference points that can be digested easily. Imagery can also be an effective tool for conveying information in a way that resonates with patients more effectively.

5. Diseases, medical conditions, and illness preventionPinterest can be used to generate awareness for diseases and how they are identified and managed. Images can be used to illustrate the way a disease affects the body and what kinds of symptoms can be present. Infographics and other images serve as powerful vehicles for educating patients.


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Using Social Media for HIV/AIDS Work: A Golden Opportunity

Using Social Media for HIV/AIDS Work: A Golden Opportunity | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it

We live in a social age, breathe the same air as savvy influentials across the country, and speak the language of many women across the world who desire to have their voices heard. Each day young women are actively engaged in their communities through discussions at neighborhood block clubs, student activities on campus, in-class, at church and other youth programs to create change for the future.

Here, the dynamic power that rests within each of these young women reveals the influence of content and how open dialogue about issues people care about, receives exposure.

 

Social media, which took flight nearly 50 years ago, is by far the most advanced and strategic method of communication in the 21st Century. We have the ability to connect with millions of influentials within seconds, and the capacity to spread a message for change instantly. According to the Pew Internet & American Life Project, 70 percent of African Americans, 72 percent of Hispanics and 65 percent of whites are social media users (Pew Internet & American Life Project).

Like many other mission-driven nonprofits, the Red Pump Project has garnered a significant trail of active listeners, thought leaders and consumers interested in education surrounding sexual and reproductive health, which is shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. The Red Pump Project Social Media Sites Usage (As of January 27, 2014).

1

Facebook9, 806 likes

2

Twitter7, 251 followers

3

Instagram1,376 followers

4

Flickr957 photos shared

5

YouTube310 video views

6

Tumblr2,000+ for one post

 

Now, you may be thinking “Why Is this Important?” Here’s a few reasons I’ll leave you with: 

Technology, now and more than ever has taken a leading role in the lives of those young and old. Healthcare organizations, nonprofits and many other organizations can take flight with their mission to attract the audience they wish to communicate with. This is a golden opportunity we’ve all been waiting for.Nearly 72% of adults use social media in some way or another.Whether a discussion about prevention, education or female empowerment, social media has the potential to bring forth awareness and value to your mission.The Pew Internet & American Life Project found nearly 15% of users receive health information via social networking sites.Power lies within every message about HIV/AIDS, so continue tweeting, posting and uploading. The power will grow stronger and the message will propel.

Sources: Pew Internet & American Life Project, “Social Networking Sites,” Accessed August, 10, 2013; Pew Internet & American Life Project, “The Social Life of Health Information: Accessed August 23, 2013.

 


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Social media help sought after medical emergencies

Social media help sought after medical emergencies | Cloud Computing and Social Media in Healthcare | Scoop.it

When Bobbie Pottorff’s stepson Joshua was diagnosed with lymphoma last month, shock soon gave way to a question: Now what?

“We have a 23-year-old son who has cancer, and he’s never been sick a day in his life,” she said.

Joshua is unable to work while undergoing chemotherapy, and medical and other expenses are piling up, The Joplin Globe (http://bit.ly/1akoGLQ ) reports.

“He had just started out in an electricians union about six months ago,” said Pottorff, of Joplin. “He wanted to have a career and a life and a family. Now he has a port in his chest and he lives with us.”

Facing expensive tests and unsure what insurance eventually will cover after the deductible is met, Pottorff did what many other area residents have done in similar situations: crowdfunding.

Using sites such as Facebook to get the word out about illnesses, injuries and fundraising events, and newer crowdfunding platforms on the Web such as gofundme.com, people in the region and around the country have found that social media can be a critical tool, whether it’s for battling back from cancer or a car accident.

Joshua now has a profile at www.youcaring.com. As of Friday, 14 donors had given $715 toward a $5,000 goal.

“I did it at the advice of a friend whose brother recently was diagnosed with cancer,” Pottorff said. “They told us there will be expenses come up you’ll need that you won’t realize.”

She also wanted a way to share updates on Joshua’s medical status and progress that didn’t require individual calls to each friend and family member - something that can be tedious and draining, she said. Youcaring.com allows her to do so within his profile and to share via Facebook and Twitter.

 

“It’s easier when you have a network of people,” she said. “Rather than make a phone call or texting every single person you know, it’s easier to reach out and make one update for everyone.”

Likewise, friends and family members turned to both the sharing power of Facebook and the online fundraising site www.gofundme.com to assist Garrett Buzzard, a 2009 graduate of Carthage High School who suffered a broken neck in a motorcycle accident on Jan. 11.

Buzzard received medical treatment in the intensive care unit at Freeman Hospital West, and on Thursday he was transferred to the Craig Hospital rehab center in Colorado - a trip with a price tag of about $10,000 that was not covered by insurance.

“I would like to encourage everyone to donate anything they can,” wrote Klista Lambeth Bacon when she set up his profile on the gofundme.com project site Jan. 22. “If all my friends on Facebook alone donated just $5, it would raise more than $3,000. Please share this on your Facebook page. Any and all donations are greatly appreciated.”

People may share via social media directly from the gofundme.com profile. By Friday, Bacon’s request had generated 1,000 Facebook shares and had raised $7,235 toward the $50,000 goal.

A Garrett Buzzard Benefit page on Facebook has 204 followers who can see immediate updates on his progress.

Buzzard’s friends also turned to Facebook to promote a chili fundraiser held at a Carthage church. By using the “create event” function, they were able to share details with hundreds of friends and family members, who in turn could issue digital invitations to hundreds of other friends and family members.

Friends and family members of Jonathan Russell, a seriously ill 34-year-old Neosho man who has been receiving treatment in St. Louis, also turned to an online fundraiser and social media site, and they say they have found great success.

“Using an online donation service has taken out the legwork of a fundraiser,” said Amber Hall, who has been managing a profile at youcaring.com to raise money for Russell’s medical expenses.

Russell was diagnosed with the H1N1 strain of flu and was admitted in early December to a local hospital, where he was quickly transferred to the intensive care unit. He also developed acute respiratory distress syndrome, a potentially life-threatening illness that can show up in the lungs of individuals who are already battling a major disease.

Now in a St. Louis hospital, Russell remains at risk of infection, so his team of doctors, nurses and other health professionals is continually monitoring his progress and condition.

Setting up an online fundraiser meant getting him immediate financial help, Hall said. By Friday, 103 supporters had contributed $10,723 toward a $20,000 goal.

A relative of a man who was found nearly frozen outside a rural Pittsburg, Kan., home on Jan. 6 in subzero temperatures said social media and online fundraising helped not just financially, but connected friends and family members who are at a distance.

“There is no doubt that social media has played a huge role from keeping friends and family updated to receiving prayers and support from everywhere,” said Shaun Hampton, of Webb City.

Hampton’s brother-in-law, Colter Steffens, 27, of Mulberry, Kan., was flown to University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan., where he spent several days in ICU recovering from hypothermia and then began physical rehabilitation and physical therapy.

Friend Jill Brinkmeyer used Facebook to issue invitations to a pancake feed at Applebee’s that raised $1,800, and she created a page to plan a band benefit and auction on March 2 at Mooreman’s in Pittsburg.

Steffens‘ aunt, Kala Hillery, established a fundraising page on gofundme.com for Steffens, with the goal of raising $1,000. With 875 shares through social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, the page raised $2,000 given by 42 people in 17 days.

Hillery also used the site to give friends and family members an update about Steffens‘ progress posted on Jan. 27.

“Facebook’s ‘share’ feature has made it possible to see people from California to Pennsylvania to other countries around the world posting prayers and kind words,” Hampton said. “I can’t even put a number on the number of people praying for him.

“We were able to post an update and tag family members. Then their friends could share with their friends, family and network of people, and one update could end up being read by hundreds of people.”



Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/feb/7/social-media-help-sought-after-medical-emergencies/#ixzz2sen8BKce ;
Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter

 


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