Social media for scientists
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Social media for scientists
Use social media to make and teach science, and to share and communicate your research. Engagement in social media provides you with an opportunity to be considered a thought leader. It's a new world out there!
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Social Media for Scientists Part 1: It’s Our Job | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network

Social Media for Scientists Part 1: It’s Our Job | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
Scientists. We're an enigmatic group of people. On the one hand, we are trailblazers. We're the innovators and inventors whose job it is, quite literally, to ...
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Alan Alda: 

“if scientists could communicate more in their own voices—in a familiar tone, with a less specialized vocabulary—would a wide range of people understand them better? Would their work be better understood by the general public, policy-makers, funders, and, even in some cases, other scientists?”
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Science blogs in research and popularization of science: why,
how and for whom?

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The Bare Minimum Of Learning Technology

The Bare Minimum Of Learning Technology | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
15 Examples Of What Could Be Considered The Bare Minimum Of Learning Technology

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Humans are losing the battle against social media algorithms

Humans are losing the battle against social media algorithms | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
Social media has become infrastructural to our society in a very literal sense, argues Tero Karppi. Computer systems are making decisions for us quicker than we can comprehend and a single tweet ca…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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'Facebook for Scientists' Could Change Science Research For Good -- And For The Better

'Facebook for Scientists' Could Change Science Research For Good -- And For The Better | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it

Ijad Madisch knows how quickly things can spread -- viruses, for example. The 34-year-old has studied pathogens, including at Harvard. Now he’s preoccupied with finding out the shortest amount of time it takes for knowledge to get from Toronto to Timbuktu, from Beijing to Berlin.

That’s because Madisch, whose family comes from Syria, is using his Berlin-based startup, ResearchGate, to build a kind of Facebook for scientists. The platform, founded in 2008, already has 6 million members. By Madisch’s estimate, that might be as many as 80 percent of the world’s researchers. Every day, Madisch said, 10,000 new scientists sign up. 

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Social Media for Scientific Institutions - How to Attract Young Academics

Social Media for Scientific Institutions - How to Attract Young Academics | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
This book covers relevant topics of social media in the area of research institutes. Daniel Hurrle and Julia Postatny follow the research question of how...
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This book covers relevant topics of social media in the area of research institutes. Daniel Hurrle and Julia Postatny follow the research question of how social media can empower the communication of such institutes by using the example of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Based on a comprehensive analysis of the designated target group of young academics, a holistic social media concept is developed with clear guidelines for immediate application and implementation. Diagrams, illustrations, models and short summaries after each section facilitate the understanding of the process and complex decisions and lead the reader gently through the topic.

http://www.gbv.de/dms/zbw/815466633.pdf

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Social Media for Scientists Part 4: On The Road | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network

Social Media for Scientists Part 4: On The Road | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
A couple weeks ago, I braved the freezing north to speak at the University of Washington for a workshop focusing on Social Media for Scientists. The ...
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Using social media for communicating science | Oxford Sparks

Using social media for communicating science | Oxford Sparks | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
Top Ten Tips: Using social media for communicating science
(Download as pdf)

Don’t use acronyms, technical jargon, or Oxford speak (e.g. “Hilary Term”). Instead, write your posts in lay English and always check your spelling.
JoseAlvarezCornett's insight:

Don’t use acronyms, technical jargon, or Oxford speak (e.g. “Hilary Term”). Instead, write your posts in lay English and always check your spelling.

Follow your peers (e.g. internal and external to your department/division/university, patient groups, journalists, news feeds, policy makers etc.) and check what they are doing.

Shorten web-links using bitly (or similar). This keeps posts easy to read and will allow you to analyse how many people click your links. Always check your links work before posting.

Make posts interesting and engaging by asking questions, surveying opinions, including images/video/blog posts (not just text). Surprise your audience or make them laugh. Give them something they will want to share or talk about. And remember that social media is social. Interact, don't just broadcast!

Be prepared to post content frequently. For Facebook it is acceptable to post at least every few days, but for Twitter you should aim to post at least daily. It is better not to start an account, than to have an inactive account. However, avoid over-posting.

Consider setting up new ‘professional’ accounts rather than using existing personal ones.

On Twitter, use hashtags (e.g. #OxfordSparks), to involve yourself in conversation threads. Avoid using more than one or two hashtags in any post.

Share interesting content, but make sure you’ve checked the original source first. On Twitter, it is standard etiquette to retweet original content. You can click the ‘retweet’ button or quote a tweet. If you quote, start your tweet with RT (retweet). If you change it when you quote, then start your tweet with MT (modified tweet).

Investigate different types of social media - blogging, image sharing etc - to see where those you want to engage with are active. Remember it is only one means of communication. Don’t rely on your social media presence alone to get the word out, but use it as part of a suite of communication tools (e.g. website, newsletters, etc.).

Acknowledge funders, sponsors, collaborators etc. (e.g. on Twitter: @NERCscience).

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Net Smart | The MIT Press

Net Smart | The MIT Press | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it

Like it or not, knowing how to make use of online tools without being overloaded with too much information is an essential ingredient to personal success in the twenty-first century. But how can we use digital media so that they make us empowered participants rather than passive receivers, grounded, well-rounded people rather than multitasking basket cases? In Net Smart, cyberculture expert Howard Rheingold shows us how to use social media intelligently, humanely, and, above all, mindfully.

 

Mindful use of digital media means thinking about what we are doing, cultivating an ongoing inner inquiry into how we want to spend our time. Rheingold outlines five fundamental digital literacies, online skills that will help us do this: attention, participation, collaboration, critical consumption of information (or “crap detection”), and network smarts. He explains how attention works, and how we can use our attention to focus on the tiny relevant portion of the incoming tsunami of information. He describes the quality of participation that empowers the best of the bloggers, netizens, tweeters, and other online community participants; he examines how successful online collaborative enterprises contribute new knowledge to the world in new ways; and he teaches us a lesson on networks and network building.

 

Rheingold points out that there is a bigger social issue at work in digital literacy, one that goes beyond personal empowerment. If we combine our individual efforts wisely, it could produce a more thoughtful society: countless small acts like publishing a Web page or sharing a link could add up to a public good that enriches everybody.

JoseAlvarezCornett's insight:

Howard Rheingold´s Net Smart is one of the best guides around for how to smartly navigate in the stream of data produced by the web and social media platforms. I am very happy to have taken classes with Howard, I have learned tons of useful things with him.

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Social Media for Scientists Part 2.5: Breaking Stereotypes | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network

Social Media for Scientists Part 2.5: Breaking Stereotypes | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
Ok, I swear I will get to Part 3 soon. But first, I want to comment on some of the critiques of my article.

There are ...
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The value and use of social media as communication tool in the plant sciences

The value and use of social media as communication tool in the plant sciences | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
Social media now complements many parts of our lives. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and many other social networking sites allow users to share and interact with online content and to connect with like-minded people.
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Ten Simple Rules of Live Tweeting at Scientific Conferences

Ten Simple Rules of Live Tweeting at Scientific Conferences | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it

"The power of mobile communications has increased dramatically in recent years such that these devices (smartphone or tablet computer) can be used productively to do science. The software applications installed on them do not necessarily have to be specialized to be useful for science, e.g., Evernote can be used as an electronic lab notebook.  Twitter is a popular microblogging platform famously limited to messages of up to 140 characters and represents a simple way to express what's on your mind to a global audience of followers. Twitter has useful real-world scientific applications, such as in disease surveillance enabling the tracking of disease pandemics, as well as the capacity to be used for the communication of science itself. Like other professionals, scientists are increasingly tweeting about their own research and the work of colleagues and sharing links to scholarly publications, laboratory results, and related scientific content such as molecular structures. Twitter can additionally serve as a catalyst in the development of scientific tools, with at least one mobile app for science coming directly out of a tweet at a scientific conference."


JoseAlvarezCornett's insight:

For this to be more effective scientists will have to also learn few tricks and tips from journalists. 

Here are some useful links:

http://www.journalism.co.uk/news/live-digital-reporting-10-tips-for-journalists-and-news-outlets/s2/a549951/

http://stevebuttry.wordpress.com/2011/09/06/suggestions-but-not-standards-for-live-tweeting/

http://www.poynter.org/how-tos/journalism-education/181255/how-journalism-educators-can-teach-students-to-live-tweet-campus-events/

http://blog.newswhip.com/index.php/2014/03/8-top-twitter-journalism-tips

http://www.journalism.co.uk/news/infographic-tips-and-advice-for-mobile-journalism-/s2/a557180/

 

 

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Bringing Astronomy Beyond the Doorstep of Social Media

Faster and more engaging than traditional media, social media gives control to individuals, who can turn into highly trusted and almost real time sources of inf
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The Future of Science is... Twitter?

The Future of Science is... Twitter? | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
Editor’s Note: This is the latest installment in our new blog series, exploring the intersection of science, society, and beyond. Follow us on Twitter (@Benchling) to catch future blog posts and product announcements! When Kim Kardashian appeared in last month’s issue of Genome Biology, it should have been
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Should All Research Papers Be Free?

Should All Research Papers Be Free? | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
One woman’s guerrilla campaign seeks to tear down the paywalls of scholarly journals and make research papers free.
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Turning Students into Good Digital Citizens

Turning Students into Good Digital Citizens | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
Teaching students how to be good digital citizens gets a boost in this article written by John K. Waters for The Journal.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Scientists Behaving Badly (On Social Media) - The Student Blog

Scientists Behaving Badly (On Social Media) - The Student Blog | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it

Why do academics attack each other personally (rather than the ideas they presented) on social media? Applies science to understand and propose solutions.

(....)

The problem
It is far too often that discussions between scientists break down into petty debate about how an idea is expressed, or where it is expressed, rather than the idea itself. The practice does not seem to be limited to any single field, as I have seen it everywhere (just look in your own newsfeed and you will find examples of this).

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How scientists can reach out with social media

How scientists can reach out with social media | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
The world needs scientists to bring science to life. Jennifer Rohn with tips on how researchers can use social media to engage new audiences.
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Social Media for Scientists Part 2: You Do Have Time. | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network

Social Media for Scientists Part 2: You Do Have Time. | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
If you look at the comments on my last post, it seems like everyone agrees that scientists should be more active online. But when I gave ...
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Social Media For Scientists Part 3: Win-Win | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network

Social Media For Scientists Part 3: Win-Win | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
I confidently believe that increasing the use of social media for outreach by scientists will positively affect how the public views and understands science. I stand ...
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Social Media For Scientists Part 5: It’s Time To e-Volve | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network

Social Media For Scientists Part 5: It’s Time To e-Volve | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
If you follow this blog closely, you know I have a strong opinion on the use of new media platforms for science communication. Well, in the ...
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Marketing for Scientists | Gobbledygook

Marketing for Scientists | Gobbledygook | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it

Scientists may feel uncomfortable about marketing their work, but we all are doing it already. We know that giving a presentation at a key meeting can be a boost for our career, and we know about the importance of maintaing an academic homepage listing our research interests and publications. And people reading this blog will understand that a science blog can be a powerful marketing tool.

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What Twitter Changes Might Mean for Academics

What Twitter Changes Might Mean for Academics | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it

“ Twitter’s earnings last quarter, after all, were an improvement on the period before, and it added 14 million new users for a total of 255 million. The thing is: Its users are less active than they once were. Twitter says these changes reflect a more streamlined experience, but we have a different theory: Twitter is entering its twilight.” 

 

"In light of these predictions, it’s not surprising that Twitter is contemplating some big changes to how it handles content and discourse. Twitter has always been notable for avoiding the algorithmic approach favored by Facebook and other social media. The hierarchy of information on Twitter is clear: the most recent tweets are always at the top, and when you log in to your timeline, the majority of your attention is focused on a constantly refreshing portrait of the moment. Content that is regularly retweeted by people you follow is more likely to appear in any time snapshot you view, and thus retweets are a way of maintaining visibility even as the hierarchy stays time-based."

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Designing a Personal Knowledgebase

"Since so much knowledge is now digital, there is no shortage of material from which I can learn. On the contrary, I’m usually drowning in too much information. But that’s a discussion for another day. For me, right now, the major problem is that I lack an easy and effective system for capturing and recording my learning. My memory alone will not suffice. What I need is a personal knowledgebase, which I define as an external, integrated digital repository for the things I learn and the resources from which they come.


Many have tried to solve the problem I’m encountering now, and numerous digital solutions exist. Some of the most popular options include Evernote, Devonthink, and Voodoo Pad. Over the course of my graduate studies, I’ve tried many of these programs, but all have fallen short of what I really need, given my own workflow."


Via Howard Rheingold
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AlisonMcNab's curator insight, September 6, 2014 4:48 PM

Informative post from @Howard Rheingold

Stephen Dale's curator insight, September 7, 2014 6:41 AM

We live in an age where information is all around us, all of the time. Sometimes we seek it out, other times it comes to us, uninvited. The only way we can learn from and apply this information (actionable knowledge) is by having the tools and know-how to be able to sort, sense, filter, organise and ultimately retrieve this information within a context where it can be applied.

 

There are lots of tools out there that can help us (I use Evernote, Mindjet Mindmapping, Social Bookmarking and Blogging as my core tools), but I haven't yet found the El Dorado of a single tool/application/software that can do it all. This article from Alex provides an outline specification of the ideal system. An opportunity for an entrepreneur - perhaps, to satisfy what I think is a growing need amongst most people grappling with the information torrent.

 

Reading time: 20mins

Crystal Renfro's curator insight, September 8, 2014 2:48 PM

This individual does a very detailed job both describing his workflow and what he would like to find in a one-stop shop tool.  All the myriad of comments opens a new flood of tools and ideas to consider.  It reiterates my belief that building interfaces between powerful tools that achieve different purposes may be the way to go... it goes back to what docear.com is trying to do.... the downside is that interfaces break very easily as different apps upgrade their products and thus makes the interface unstable.

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Social Media for Science Communication: Scientific Communication Decalogue / Comunicar la Ciencia a través de las redes sociales: Decálogo de la Comunicación Científica

Social Media for Science Communication: Scientific Communication Decalogue / Comunicar la Ciencia a través de las redes sociales: Decálogo de la Comunicación Científica | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
Science communication is changing: scientific research is reaching to a wider range of recipients through other channels different to the exiting traditional ones thanks to more varied and innovati...
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How quickly data is generated in social media networks. Click & See it.

How quickly data is generated in social media networks. Click & See it. | Social media for scientists | Scoop.it
From tweets to likes, see how fast data is generated every second on the internet in this interactive visualization.
JoseAlvarezCornett's insight:

When data means money, eh?

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