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Social Media and Patient Advocacy

These are the slides from my talk at the 4th Annual Putting Patients First Conference in Mumbai.

 

If god were to manifest the world using technology, he would first create something like social media. Conceptually provide technology with the ability to understand the thoughts of a population


SocMed leaves behind the old model of 1-to-1 communication – “talking to someone over the phone”  Enables one-to-many communication (via blogs or microblogging) or many-to-many communication (discussion forums, social walls). Now anyone can setup an online community site/portal to represent a small or big offline community.

 

Further, anyone can setup an online site related to a treatment, a disease, a doctor, a drug , a concept or anything and see it grow into a popular site which in effect is simply the manifestation of a community which exists/ed but which no one ever knew of.


Via nrip
Marie Ennis-O'Connor's insight:

Thanks so much for sharing your slides - i am looking forward to reading them. 

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PatientView's curator insight, November 28, 2013 8:19 AM

We have figures on the scale of soical media intreaction by patient advocates. In countries where the impact of the finanical crisis is at its worst, patient advocates have turned to social media to interact with one another and raise awareness  of the predicaments of their country's healthcare system to place pressure on government when undertaking reforms. 

Plaza Dental Group's curator insight, January 29, 8:53 AM

Great info! I think SocMed  will boost the thought of population and will effect change in local communities. 

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Beyond the Buzz: Healthcare Social Media | HealthWorks Collective

Beyond the Buzz: Healthcare Social Media | HealthWorks Collective | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
In my new column, "Beyond the Buzz," learn not only how to use social media in healthcare, but how to do it exceptionally well.
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Art Jones's curator insight, February 25, 10:36 AM

Thank you @Jbbc

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Cancer patients on Twitter: a novel patient community on social media

Cancer patients on Twitter: a novel patient community on social media | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Patients increasingly turn to the Internet for information on medical conditions, including clinical news and treatment options. In recent years, an online patient community has arisen alongside the rapidly expanding world of social media, or “Web 2.0.” Twitter provides real-time dissemination of news, information, personal accounts and other details via a highly interactive form of social media, and has become an important online tool for patients. This medium is now considered to play an important role in the modern social community of online, “wired” cancer patients.


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Think before you tweet: a lawyers’ guide to using social media at work

Think before you tweet: a lawyers’ guide to using social media at work | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
From breaches of confidentiality to airing workplace grievances, here’s what public servants should avoid online
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How pharma should harness mobile technology

How pharma should harness mobile technology | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
A huge proportion of the adult population now carries a smartphone, so pharma and healthcare providers need to look to this 'doctor in your pocket' potential to augment the face-to-face consultation, improve medicines adherence and inform better...
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Karin Benckert's curator insight, Today, 3:51 AM

Att patienten efterfrågar möjligheten till "en doktor på fickan" i o m smartphones kan konstateras. Och hälso- och sjukvården är inne på samma spår. Det handlar inte om att ersätta det personliga mötet utan med nya lösningar erbjuda en bättre vård. Varför ska läkemedelsindustrin vänta på att tredjepartsbolag förstått och skapat lösningar som möter hälso- och sjukvårdens behov? Nej, det är nu läkemedelsindustrin kan göra skillnad och ta en aktiv roll i formandet av framtidens sjukvård genom att leda utvecklingen i t ex appar för att öka behandlingsföljsamheten hos patienten. På så vis finns fina möjligheter att leverera värde "after the pill" till hälso- och sjukvården. 

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From Patient to Consumer – A Changing Paradigm

From Patient to Consumer – A Changing Paradigm | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
By Ken Saitow, President and CEO, CareWire Inc.

There is widespread agreement that in today’s dynamic healthcare
environment the shift from volume to value, among other macro-level trends,
makes it more important than ever to get individuals actively involved in
their own care. This strategic imperative has become widely recognized as
“patient engagement”.  Like so many buzzwords that have come before it –
think big data, business intelligence, and outcomes – patient engagement is
fast becoming one of those terms that is over used and whose promise is far
from realized.

Before going any further, I would like to submit for consideration an
important change to this phrase.  Because words do matter, I believe there
is a strong case that can be made to change patient engagement to
healthcare consumer engagement.  As things currently stand, the first word,
“patient”, carries with it baggage from the healthcare environment of
yesterday.  Merriam-Webster defines the word patient as “an individual
awaiting or under medical care and treatment”. By definition, this excludes
the population of individuals who are well and that we want to keep healthy
– a critical segment that we want “engaged” in their healthcare. It also
brings to mind a transactional relationship – one that has a beginning,
middle and end. This is in stark contrast to a relationship that has the
potential to span an individual’s entire life. In today’s world, it is more
appropriate to think about the target of engagement activities as a health
care “consumer”  - an individual who utilizes goods or services - versus a
patient. Once we begin thinking about the target of engagement activities
as consumers, expectations of quality, frequency and communication channels
increase dramatically. This is especially true as we consider other
industries that we as consumers interact with on a day-to-day basis.  In
this context, the goal of “good enough” falls woefully short.

With that out of the way…

While healthcare consumer engagement is a common topic of discussion and
many innovative health care IT companies are placing big bets on engagement
solutions, the typical healthcare provider is not currently expending much
energy evaluating and fundamentally revisiting how they are communicating
with consumers. This is a missed opportunity. Healthcare providers are
under extreme pressure to not only do more with less but to “do better”
with less – increase quality, improve outcomes, enhance the experience.
Rethinking how they are communicating and interacting with consumers will
drive significant efficiencies today – where every dollar counts – while
establishing a foundation to support the consumer engagement needs of
tomorrow.

Many provider organizations will point to their patient portal as an
example of an advancement in consumer communication.  Due to the current
level of consumer adoption, however, this channel is falling short of
delivering material value to both providers and consumers. In many ways,
the patient portal is an extension of the historical “we will see you now”
paradigm where nothing of value can happen until the patient presents
physically (or now virtually) to a place owned and managed by the provider.

While there are many other communication channels that can and are being
utilized to engage consumers – the mobile device is one that has not yet
been fully embraced by healthcare providers as a strategic communication
tool. When you consider the fact that the typical US adult has their mobile
phone with them and accessible almost 22 hours out of every day and that
this device is all but replacing other forms of communication, is it
astonishing that it has not been leveraged as a way to extend the care
delivery process.

So, what should a healthcare provider consider when putting together a
mobile consumer engagement approach? The following are a few
recommendations to consider:

Utilize “Low Friction” Mobile Channels – While Apps, for example, are
getting a lot of attention in healthcare they are not necessarily the best
way to achieve maximum reach. Getting the typical consumer to download an
App is proving to be difficult, and, arguably, those downloading Apps are
not necessarily the ones that really need to be reached. Seek to leverage
push-oriented communication channels that have already realized wide spread
adoption, such as mobile messaging, to their absolute fullest. Consider
socio-economics and demographics of those you want to reach when
architecting your mobile communication approach. If a consumer’s primary
language is Spanish, for example, consistently communicate with them in
Spanish.

 Offer the Consumer Value – Communicate information at precisely the moment
the consumer needs to do something or know something about their care. The
level of engagement is directly proportional to the value they see.
Examples include alerting them to the fact that they have reached a
milestone (such as a birthday) and it time for a diagnostic procedure,
educating them about the procedure they are about to have or checking in
with them after a procedure to ensure the recovery process is going as
planned.

Use One Channel to Complement Another – Exploit channels that are not only
effective on their own, but also enhance the effectiveness of other
channels by bringing those channels to the healthcare consumer. For
example, consider the situation where a lab result is available on the
patient portal.  One approach to driving traffic to the portal (which by
all accounts has been a challenge) is to send a mobile message alerting the
consumer to this fact and – in the spirit of low friction – include a link
to the portal within the message that will allow them to click directly
through.

Always Maintain the Consumer’s Point of View – We are all healthcare
consumers. Bear in mind what it is like to get information from your
provider and how easy it is to become overwhelmed by what you need to do
and when. This feeling of being overwhelmed is further multiplied when you
factor in your emotional state. Perhaps you are caring for a sick child or
an aging parent. Communicating in a way that is easily accessible, clear,
just in time and can be referenced at a later date become critical success
factors.

Changing the paradigm from patient to consumer and rethinking communication
approaches within this context will pay immense dividends:

* The consumer experience will be greatly enhanced promoting more
intimate, long-term relationships and a consumer that is engaged
throughout their healthcare journey.
* Provider asset utilization – people, technology, space – will be
improved by creating a highly personalized interaction that drives
consumer understanding and adherence.
* Enables healthcare providers to quickly and effectively respond to
new and evolving healthcare requirements that require engaged
consumers.

Changing our paradigm from patient to healthcare consumer and putting this
new mindset to work in the most efficient, effective and relevant
communication mode in the lives of all consumers are critical steps to
realizing the promise of  true engagement.
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'Silver surfers' more health savvy

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Moving from "Big Data" to "Smart Data" in Digital Health - PHARMAGEEK

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« Wearables and other digital health tools have the ability to gather an unprecedented amount of data from patients. What’s the best way to turn this data into meaningful diagnostic information for doctors and patients alike? Ray Bradford shares his thoughts on what can be done across the industry to reach this goal. » Source: www.youtube.com
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36 Uses for Video: Magnify Your Healthcare Marketing Big Time

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The Internet is video-rich. By some estimates, half of all the traffic online is in video format. And, healthcare marketing is increasingly embracing video as a means to effectively and efficiently tell its story.
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Digital and mobile health: can doctors and consumers get on the same wavelength? | Health Populi

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Generating Medical Practice Referrals Using Social Media - Medical Practice Marketing

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Doctors and other medical providers have traditionally sought referrals only from existing clients. Until just recently, that was the only means. But in today’s world of social marketing, there is another way, and even a better way to go about medical practice marketing. Who is using social media for medical practice marketing? More than twenty …
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Edgardo Vazquez's curator insight, November 20, 4:04 PM

20% de medicos en consultorio de USA utilizan Redes Sociales para marketing de sus practicas profesionales

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Social media insights help locate healthcare professionals

Social media insights help locate healthcare professionals | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
Listening to HCP conversation helps brand teams locate healthcare professionals discussing their brand or therapy area are (both online and offline).
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Helen Adams's curator insight, November 17, 3:56 AM

Hardly earth shattering information, go where the audience are going, but how many of us are doing just this?

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Reiterating the Use of Social Media in Exploring Drug Safety Information | HCL Technologies

Reiterating the Use of Social Media in Exploring Drug Safety Information | HCL Technologies | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
The FDA's regulatory requirements mandate the conduct of pre-clinical studies and clinical trials to establish product safety and efficacy of drugs, before they are launched in the market. Data from clinical trials represents the most pragmatic method of detecting possible new Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). They can be conveniently assessed by officers at the FDA and may be used to mark the drugs’ safety positioning / profile. These ADEs are listed, and the information about them is readily available on FDA’s website.
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Do Cancer Patients Tweet? Examining the Twitter Use of Cancer Patients in Japan

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Europeans becoming enthusiastic users of online health information

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A new EU-wide survey shows that Europeans are hungry for online information about health and healthy lifestyles.
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Better Thinking, Together: Rx for Growth: Healthcare + Social Media

Better Thinking, Together: Rx for Growth: Healthcare + Social Media | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Fact: Looking for health information is the third most popular online activity.

Fact: Two-thirds of internet users look for information on a specific disease or medical condition.

Fact: The day that Facebook altered profile pages to allow members to specify their organ donor-status, 13,054 people registered to be organ donors online in the United States, a 21-fold increase over the daily average of 616 registrations.

Social media and healthcare go along together like peanut butter & jelly. People want to find healthcare information easily. They want to connect with others who share their situation. Before the doctor visit, people want to be aware of their combined symptoms and the conditions possibly connected to them. And while self-diagnosing has never been a reliable method, internet users continue to browse the web for answers.

As a healthcare provider, relaying information and being easily accessible to your patients besides a scheduled appointment is vitally important. It’s something Mayo Clinic has known for years – and why they’ve led the healthcare revolution on social media… to the tune of 772,000 Twitter followers, 498,252 likes on Facebook, with regular YouTube content publishing and additional podcasts and blog posts.


What does it all mean to you?


It’s time to dip a toe into social media. While this doesn’t mean you have to start out huge – Mayo Clinic-style – the benefits associated with an online presence are too valuable not to connect and engage with your patients and community. There is a vast selection of trending social media tools for you to choose from. Besides the classic methods like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, opportunities abound. Instagram, Snapchat, StumbleUpon, Pinterest and Reddit are just five of the creative platforms that businesses and healthcare facilities are beginning to use to connect with their community.

 Instagram: Share photos and short videos online with applied digital filters. Hashtags are used to sort postings.Snapchat: Similar to Instagram, this platform is used to share pictures and short videos. Media is not posted publicly, instead it is shared with contacts for a set time limit.StumbleUpon: Classified as a discovery engine (a type of search engine). Users select interests and rate the websites, photos and videos that appear each time the user "stumbles." Pages with high ratings are shared with like-minded individuals.Pinterest: Users create and share boards with various pinned items such as websites, pages, etc. Boards can be used to develop projects or store pictures.Reddit: Community member-driven news website. Members can submit content, and member votes determine the ranking and position of content within the site.


At the minimum, it is vital for healthcare providers to have an active Twitter account and/or a Facebook page for their patients to connect with.

Stories of Facebook engagement and intervention are everywhere. From the nurse who found out about a patient’s struggle with the anniversary of the day his friend died in his arms, to the trauma teams who were better prepared after learning of the Boston bombings on Facebook.

In fact, Facebook itself is exploring the possibilities of leading online support communities, where Facebook users suffering from the same condition could share stories, commiserate and in theory, improve their quality of life. Whether you choose to go that far – or simply share your thoughts and expertise or provide an avenue for conversation – your patients will find a comfort level when they find you on social media (36% of internet users look online for information about hospitals or other medical facilities). 

Social media is not going away. Younger generations who grew up with the internet and social media platforms are now reaching the age of decision about their own healthcare providers. 89% of 18-29 year olds use social media. Being easily accessible to those potential patients on the platforms they use can take you the distance.

However it may develop, the social media-healthcare relationship is just beginning. The Healthcare Hashtag Project tracks where healthcare conversations take place, and when we last checked, healthcare social media buzzed to the tune of 629 million tweets and 11 million topics.

Diseases trending as of presstime:

#Migraine
#Ebola
#BTSM
#LCSM
#Vote4DM
#BCSM
#Keratoconus
#Diabetes#Lymphoma
#BRCA
#BreastCancer
#BrainTumorThursday
#LynchSyndrome
#PainSomnia
#EbolaChat


Your mission is clear: Talk the talk. Let your voice be heard and provide your community with the answers they are searching. Be active and reachable on the accounts you have.


Via Plus91, DIRECT MEDICA
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Why mHealth Brands Need an Agile Approach to Marketing

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Gathering and transmitting vital information is a core function of the healthcare industry, and over the last decade the impact of new technology has completely transformed many procedures. What has emerged from this evolutionary process is the broad field of mHealth where everything from retrieval of patient records, to physician collaboration, to monitoring a patient’s medication compliance has changed.

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The Uproar Over the New Samaritans Radar Twitter App

Ed: We invited Mark Brown (@markoneinfour) to share the perspective from the Twitterverse on a new Twitter app released yesterday by the UK charity, the Samaritans, meant to help people who express suicidal words on Twitter. We also asked the Samaritans...
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Tweetchat for patient-preferred fibromyalgia outcomes | The Cochrane Collaboration

Tweetchat for patient-preferred fibromyalgia outcomes | The Cochrane Collaboration | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Three Cochrane Review Groups to engage with relevant consumer and patient groups using simple questions to identify important outcomes in fibromyalgia, via Twitter.

Marie Ennis-O'Connor's insight:

This is a great way to use social media for research and relevance

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The Compelling Case for Doctors to Warmly Embrace Social Media

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Doctor-to-doctor advice about embracing social media, where there are more benefits and opportunity than risk.
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MedEdWorld - A Reflection on Social Media in Medical Education

MedEdWorld - A Reflection on Social Media in Medical Education | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

A great deal has been written on the use of social media in medical education.  For both the novice and experienced user, there are so many different aspects to consider, and so many new media emerging, while others lose prominence, that the environment and how best to survive and thrive in it can be rather daunting.

This reflection encourages one to step back a little, and take an overview of some essentials when using social media in medical education.  It is aimed mostly at the novice, but also at those who have used social media for a while, and are feeling a little overwhelmed.

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Code of Conduct for Healthcare Professionals on Social Media

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The digital domain is an excellent platform for communication. And if professionals across several industries are getting connected then why should professionals from the healthcare industry lag behind?

Via Antoine POIGNANT, MD
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"Why" Establish Your Healthcare Social Media Digital Footprint

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From the archives ... At its heart, digital media is about people, it is about relationships, and it is about communication. Establishing a digital footpri
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As Facebook Turns Toward Healthcare, Social Media Privacy Concerns Increase

As Facebook Turns Toward Healthcare, Social Media Privacy Concerns Increase | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
Facebook is all about sharing. That’s why its apparent foray into healthcare is causing increased concerns about social media privacy.
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Kevin Moran's curator insight, November 15, 4:53 PM

There are legitimate privacy concerns.  However, it amazes me what people will post on Facebook and other social media sites about their personal health!

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Healthcare Social Media: How 3 Top Healthcare IT Companies Succeed Using Social Media

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It is no secret that consumers use the Internet to find information on physicians, treatments, and health plans. According to many critics Healthcare companies
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Use Social Media In The Fight Against Communicable Diseases

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If there were a way to use existing technology to help identify people potentially exposed to Ebola (or any communicable disease like SARS or the flu) would..
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