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140 Health Care Uses for Twitter

140 Health Care Uses for Twitter | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Twitter’s simplicity of functional design, speed of delivery and ability to connect two or more people around the world provides a powerful means of communication, idea-sharing and collaboration. There’s potency in the ability to burst out 140 characters, including a shortened URI. Could this power have any use in healthcare? After all, for example, doctors and nurses share medical information, often as short bursts of data (lab values, conditions, orders, etc.).

Marie Ennis-O'Connor's insight:

Mega list from Phil Bauman on how Twitter may be used for healthcare

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eMedToday's curator insight, June 23, 2013 7:40 PM

There is no limit to how you might use twitter in a busienss

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Beyond the Buzz: Healthcare Social Media | HealthWorks Collective

Beyond the Buzz: Healthcare Social Media | HealthWorks Collective | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
In my new column, "Beyond the Buzz," learn not only how to use social media in healthcare, but how to do it exceptionally well.
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Social Media: A Useful Tool for Patient-centered Outcomes Research?

My talk for the Brown University Emergency Medicine Digital Health Innovation Group
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The Networked Public Physician: Will you take the plunge?

Slides for my talk to the 1st year medical students at the University of Michigan about the transformative power of social media. Check out the homework I gave…
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Social Media In Health Care: Stories From The Front Lines

Social Media In Health Care: Stories From The Front Lines | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
Hear real stories about adopting social media in health care from top industry professionals. Learn how social media can improve patient satisfaction
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Pharma and social media: A qualitative look

Pharma and social media: A qualitative look | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
KEY TAKEAWAY: Analysis of two social media accounts, Twitter and Pinterest, show that the majority of followers were either industry people (media, agencies) and that patent followers were not enga...
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7 Content Ideas from the Best Doctor Blogs

7 Content Ideas from the Best Doctor Blogs | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Good doctor blogging is a lot like good doctoring: Listen to patients and try to meet their needs. Extra points for being funny, warm, thoughtful and, most of all, engaging. Try some or all of these patient-friendly content types on your medical practice blog:

1. Answer frequently asked questions

Howard J. Luks, an orthopedic surgeon in Westchester and Dutchess Counties, New York, bases his blog on questions his patients ask in office, writing posts such as “Why Does the Front of My Knee Hurt?” and “You Have Torn Your Meniscus: What’s Next?” He explains how he comes up with blog post ideas in “Great Medical Blog Content: Think Like a Patient”.

2. Give health tips (with numbers)

For some reason, titles with numbers do well on the internet, probably because they promise the reader quick, concise information delivery. Take a look at “Atrial Flutter — 15 facts you may want to know” from the blog of cardiologist John Mandrola in Louisville, Kentucky.

3. Shoot video

Las Vegas internist Zubin Damania’s blog is a collection of parody music videos starring his alter ego ZDoggMD—they’re a little bit educational and a lot funny. That’s him in the image above, explaining Obamacare. Watch Damania do Taylor Swift as a doctor-shopping pill addict in “Blank Script” and Garth Brooks in “Friends with Low Platelets”. If you don’t have his singing and acting talent, a simple explanatory video like “‪What is Plantar Fasciitis?” by Philadelphia sports podiatrist Lee S. Cohen is fine. Just don’t expect to get ZDogg’s hundreds of thousands of video views on YouTube.

4. Chronicle the silly side of daily life as a doc

The author of the Dr. Grumpy in the House blog is anonymous, and a good thing too because the blog is all about the inane things his or her patients do or say, mostly told in verbatim dialogue, like this phone call:

Mrs. Call: “My husband is having a seizure. He sees Dr. Nerve for epilepsy.”

Dr. Grumpy: “Okay, do you have a medication to give him for seizures?”

Mrs. Call: “It’s in the bathroom. Can’t I just hold the phone next to him and you tell him to stop?”

5. Explore the doctor-patient relationship

Dr. Val Jones runs health education company Better Health and her blog posts at GetBetterHealth.com like “Why Do Patients Lie to Doctors?” go to the heart of the doctor-patient relationship and are equally readable by those on both sides of the stethoscope. She suggests some blog post topics for doctors in this list.

6. Filter the news

Patients need a guide to point out what’s important in the mountain of health news and information on the internet. That could be you. Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s The Chart blog on CNN.com is a good example of creating a news feed by highlighting a few of the many medical studies that get published.

7. Pick a niche, be an authority and do it with a distinctive voice

Greenville, South Carolina, pediatrician Chad Hayes blogs on “demystifying parenting and pediatrics” in a straight-talking style, like the post “Just Call It ‘Colic’: The Diagnosis That Isn’t”, a refreshing admission that doctors don’t really know much about a common condition. Colin E. Champ, a Pittsburgh radiation oncologist, blogs atCavemanDoctor.com, advocating for the “caveman diet” and critiquing conventional wisdom in medicine, diet and exercise.

And watch this blog for more tips and inspiration…

Pioneering doctor blogger Kevin Pho, a primary care doc in Nashua, New Hampshire, gives hands-on advice on running a blog and links to the latest posts from hundreds of other doctor blogs at KevinMD.com.

 


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#HIPAAandBeyond: Legal Issues in Social Media 2015 HCCA Compliance I…

#HIPAAandBeyond: Legal Issues in Social Media 2015 HCCA Compliance I… | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
Explore various legal risks associated with the use of social media in the healthcare industry, including HIPAA, risks for employers, state privacy laws, twitt…
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Why Does a Twittering Doctor Tweet?

Why Does a Twittering Doctor Tweet? | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
I borrowed the title from Dr. Anne Marie Cunningham (@amcunningham). It's from her Slideshare presentation. She lists 10 reasons why doctors should try Twitter.   Why does a twittering doctor ...
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Pharma growing its use of social media - report - PMLiVE

Pharma growing its use of social media - report - PMLiVE | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Pharma's corporate participation in social media is rapidly evolving with a small contingent of companies looking to take its digital activities further.

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Internet of Things (IoT): Four Ways it will impact Health

Internet of Things (IoT): Four Ways it will impact Health | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

My vision of a digital health revolution is in four parts, those being:

Access to information (the internet age)Access to each other (the socialised internet)Access to ourselves (the rise of quantified self, expressed through mobile and wearable health technology)Access to everyone (the subsequent development and application of big data)

 

What is interesting is that it is really a revolution in five parts, the final one is not as noisy as the previous four. It could even be called silent, but there is good reason to believe it will be the most important for the future of medicine, healthcare and well-being. This is the connectivity to everything. 


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Tim Mustill's curator insight, April 30, 12:00 PM

Without help this revolution will by-pass the demographic that need it most ie the unwired, co-morbid, underprivileged elderly. Thankfully there are some companies out there trying to access these stakeholders eg http://www.seespeak.co.uk/

 

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A New Source of Data for Public Health Surveillance: Facebook Likes

A New Source of Data for Public Health Surveillance: Facebook Likes | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

Facebook likes may be a source of digital data that can complement traditional public health surveillance systems and provide data at a local level.

Marie Ennis-O'Connor's insight:

This study concluded that Facebook may provide more reliable, timely, and cost-effective county-level data than that obtainable from traditional public health surveillance systems as well as serve as an adjunct to those systems.

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MEdIC Series | The Case of the FOAM Faux Pas

MEdIC Series | The Case of the FOAM Faux Pas | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
The use of online open access secondary has increased recently. Many clinicians are turning to these resources for continuing education. There is debate about these resources that can occasionally result in conflict between early adopters and those…
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How will healthcare professionals use Periscope, Twitter’s new streaming video app?

How will healthcare professionals use Periscope, Twitter’s new streaming video app? | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
The new live streaming  app Periscope, launched by Twitter at the end of March, is causing much excitement. I was on my Twitter feed and a local TV station tweeted “join us on #Periscope”. I was ...
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5 Tips on Social Media for Pharma Marketing

5 Tips on Social Media for Pharma Marketing | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
Social media marketing presents challenges for every company in defining the appropriate voice for the brand and how to engage. However, some companies are
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The Empowered E-Patients and social media, healthcare

The Empowered E-Patients and social media, healthcare | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

“ "E-Patient" is a term used to describe individuals who use the Internet and other tools to seek out, share and sometimes create information about health and wellness. Common words used to describe E-Patients: 1.e-patient, 2. internet patient, 3. health seeker, 4. cyberchondriac. As EHR implementation and adoption becomes more commonplace across the health care environment, providers are beginning to focus more on maximizing the value from their investment. Stakeholder engagement is a critical success factor for the effective use of EHRs and other health IT and patients are one of the last, and most important, groups to get involved in this process. While EHRs continue to evolve and technologies like patient portals become more common, providers have the opportunity to drive improvements in quality by encouraging patients to become an active participant in their own care.”


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An overview of Social Media Use in Medical Education

Describe how different Social Media tools can be used in teaching, research, leadership and professional development. Summarize the advantages and perils of th…
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How social media can be used to track disease outbreaks

How social media can be used to track disease outbreaks | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

A full nine days before Ebola was even recognized by the World Health Organizations as an epidemic there was something else. HealthMap, a software that mines government websites, social networks and local news reports, identified a “mystery hemorrhagic fever” that was going around.

This raised the question: What potential do the vast amounts of data shared through social media hold in identifying outbreaks and controlling the disease?

A San Diego State University professor recently authored a study that shows the connection between predicting potential outbreaks (specifically pertussis and influenza) and social media and data from mobile phones.

Ming-Hsiang Tsou believes that algorithms that may be applied to tweets and information stored in mobile phones can be used to predict and track outbreaks.

“Traditional methods of collecting patient data, reporting to health officials and compiling reports are costly and time consuming,” said Tsou. “In recent years, syndromic surveillance tools have expanded and researchers are able to exploit the vast amount of data available in real time on the Internet at minimal cost.”

Given the popularity of social media, infectious disease surveillance systems that use data-sharing technologies to accurately track social media data could potentially inform early warning systems and outbreak response, and facilitate communication between health-care providers and local, national and international health authorities.

 

Social media tracking: Then and now

Currently there are no official national programs for disease surveillance via social media, but several systems are being used as complementary sources of information.

For example, disease detection app Flu Near You helps predict outbreaks of the flu in real time. Users self-report symptoms in a weekly survey, which the app then analyzes and maps to show where pockets of influenza-like illness are located. Flu Near You is administered by HealthMap in partnership with the American Public Health Association and the Skoll Global Threats Fund. The effort is supported with private funds to demonstrate its utility for multiple sectors that work together on pandemic preparedness. The information on the site is available to public health officials, researchers, disaster planning organizations and anyone else who may find the information useful.

“There are real opportunities for using this data that is scattered across the Web in news, blogs, chat rooms and social media,” John Brownstein, HealthMap co-founder and associate professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, told Emergency Management in a recent interview. “We’re focused on collecting all that information using data scraping, machine learning and other processes and combining it into one platform that will enable clinicians, public health practitioners and consumers to see what’s happening.”

Understanding the accuracy of such information is also important, said Tsou, whose recent study explored the interaction between cyberspace message activity (measured by keyword-specific tweets) and real-world occurrences of influenza and pertussis. Tweets were collected within a 17-mile radius of 11 U.S. cities chosen on the basis of population and the availability of disease data. Tweets were then aggregated by week and compared to weekly influenza-like illness and pertussis incidence. The correlation coefficients between tweets or subgroups of tweets and disease occurrence were then calculated and trends were presented graphically.

“The correlation between the weekly flu tweets versus the national flu data was almost 86 percent,” said Tsou. “It was a very high correlation. Even more interesting is that when we compared our data to data from the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency, who we partner with, we received even more precise data on weekly flu cases reported through their lab testing. The correlation was 93 percent — even higher than the national level. That was a very encouraging finding.”

But utilizing social media data in this manner also presents challenges, such as correlating a social media post with a specific disease or condition. 

“A lot of people tweet that they have a fever or have the flu, but sometimes that information isn’t specific enough for us to connect it with a disease like whooping cough,” Tsou said. “That’s one of the limitations we are dealing with.”

“There’s both a blessing and a curse to using social media in that it’s super rapid, but it also generates huge amounts of noise,” Brownstein said. “Dealing with all the noise and trying to pick out the signals that have meaning is definitely a challenge.”

A world of possibilities for public health

Some public health agencies are already beginning to rely on social media data to investigate health issues. 

For example, last year the Chicago Department of Public Health began using Twitter to identify cases of foodborne outbreaks. The department teamed up with a group called Smart Chicago to develop an app that analyzes tweets that reference food poisoning, leading the city to step up inspections and enforcement on offending establishments. 

The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is taking a similar approach. It recently worked with Columbia University and Yelp on a pilot to prospectively identify restaurant reviews on Yelp that referred to foodborne illness.

“These systems are operational, and they are being used by government entities to provide situational awareness,” Brownstein said. “They’re not necessarily the only sources of information, but they are an important source of information.”

But it may still be a while before public health departments officially adopt social media data as a significant element of their regular investigations.

 


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How to Grow a Medical Practice with Social Media Marketing

How to Grow a Medical Practice with Social Media Marketing | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

According to a study by the American Academy of Family Physicians, 70% of primary care physicians use social media marketing at least once a month.  So, if you run a medical practice, social media is not something that you can afford to ignore.  After all, if your competitors are doing it, you should be doing it too.  But just how can you use social media to grow your medical practice?  Here, Best Edge Medical Marketing provide some tips.

 

1. Have a Purpose

Before you start using social media, you need to have a purpose for what you are doing.  For a medical practice, you will ideally want to build your follower count, and increase the level of trust that people have for you.  But what is your main purpose?  Do you want to inform your community about pressing health issues, or do you want to attract baby boomers to your practice?  Once you have a purpose, you can work out who your demographic is, and then sign up to the relevant platforms.

2. Post Relevant Content Regularly

Videos of cats may be cute, but they’re not the best thing to publish on your social media platforms if you want to gain the trust of your followers.  With most homeowners now having the internet, it’s easier than ever to self diagnose.  Unfortunately, many of these diagnoses are wrong, which can lead to many patients feeling anxious.  Your social media platforms could be a place for people to go to obtain reassurance and real advice.  So make a point to post content regularly, interact with your followers, and engage your community.  Keep your social media pages active, and post relevant information that can help those in your area.

3. Remain Professional

Whilst it’s vital to engage with your community on social media, it is also incredibly important to remain professional.  Before pressing the ‘submit’ or ‘post’ button, read back what you have written and see if you are happy with it.  A good rule of thumb is to see whether your mother would be happy with what you have written.  Whilst you don’t want your posts to come across as boring, they always need to be professional and should follow the same etiquette rules that you would use in real life.  Remember, you are representing your company on social media, and anything you say can and will impact your reputation.

4. Don’t Overshare

You might find it cathartic to share information about a specific problem patient, but it won’t do your reputation any favors.  It could even land you in court if the patient can identify themselves from what you have posted.  You really should never, ever post anything about a patient online.  Even if you think you are anonymously talking about a condition one of your patients is facing, you shouldn’t do it without their permission.  Another thing you should avoid doing is answering any specific medical questions.  Instead, advise them to visit your practice so that you can perform a proper diagnosis.

Social media marketing is a great way to engage your community, but you should take the time to do it correctly.  Otherwise, you may end up harming your reputation.

- See more at: http://www.internetbillboards.net/2015/04/29/how-to-grow-a-medical-practice-with-social-media-marketing/#sthash.LxiF1d4M.dpuf

 


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People participate online to help others, and be part of a community

People participate online to help others, and be part of a community | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it

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How should Healthcare be using Social Media?

How should Healthcare be using Social Media? | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
"Sorry to hear that you've contracted MRSA..." "I'm afraid that we can't provide those strong painkillers over the counter, we need to see your insurance details first" "No, fish fingers are not a ...
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When the Tweeters Are the Treaters

When the Tweeters Are the Treaters | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
With great power comes great responsibility for physicians on social media, says ACP presenter.
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Engaging Physicians During the Rise of Digital Health

Engaging Physicians During the Rise of Digital Health | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
With big shifts like the Sunshine Act restrictions and physicians’ increasing appetite for an interactive, virtual experience, the tides are changing in the pharma industry— and if pharma marketers don’t respond accordingly, they may find themselves washed ashore and stranded.

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Vaccination and social media: the perfect storm - mHealth

Vaccination and social media: the perfect storm - mHealth | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
The latest measles outbreak in the United States has raised alarms about vaccines policies. In 2014, CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Preven...
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Should Patients Be Able to Find Organ Donors on Facebook?

Should Patients Be Able to Find Organ Donors on Facebook? | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
A recent case in Belgium, in which a man took to social media to ask for a kidney, is raising questions about who can ethically donate.
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What healthcare professionals should know about social media profiles and industry guidelines

What healthcare professionals should know about social media profiles and industry guidelines | Health Care Social Media And Digital Health | Scoop.it
There seem to be confusion on what constitute private space on social media. Also, there's a dichotomy between
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