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Predicting success for new drugs using Social Media analysis

Predicting success for new drugs using Social Media analysis | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it

Treato's Gideon Mantel writes:

 

Social media can predict the success of a new drug launch much faster than traditional methods. Many pharmaceutical companies try to measure the success of their launch based on weekly script trends. The difference between social media data and data derived from prescriptions is significant: social media data can predict the future, while script data record the past.

 

Social media can also, to some degree, explain events and not just record them, since patient posts are much more nuanced than purchase data, often sharing the why and not just the what.

 

Using older methods, it can take years to understand the result and impact of a new drug launch. Today social media can provide early vital signals in real time.

 

To illustrate this, let’s look at Tecfidera (formerly called BG-12 during clinical trials), a new multiple sclerosis drug that Biogen launched on April 13 [through an examination of the patient voice from billions of patient-written social media posts on over 2,000 health blogs and forums].

 

Interestingly, since the launch of Tecfidera in mid-April, the most talked about MS drug in social media has been Tecfidera, bypassing all other MS medications and growing on a daily basis. We also see significant differences between Tecfidera discussions and that of other MS medications in that 36% of the Tecfidera discussions are on Facebook while for other MS medications only 28% of the discussions are taking place on Facebook (our analysis does not include Twitter).


Via Andrew Spong
Marie Ennis-O'Connor's insight:

Interesting.

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Art Jones's curator insight, May 31, 2013 7:45 AM

Monitoring social media conversations can predict the success of a new drug or not, more accurately than in the past.

Health Care Social Media Monitor
Monitoring The Pulse Of Health Care Social Media
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Beyond the Buzz: Healthcare Social Media | HealthWorks Collective

Beyond the Buzz: Healthcare Social Media | HealthWorks Collective | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
In my new column, "Beyond the Buzz," learn not only how to use social media in healthcare, but how to do it exceptionally well.
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Art Jones's curator insight, February 25, 7:36 AM

Thank you @Jbbc

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Three Trends for App Developers to Watch in Mobile Health

Three Trends for App Developers to Watch in Mobile Health | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
As mobile healthcare technology emerges as a mainstream staple of modern healthcare, a growing number of app developers want to break into this

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Social Media In Healthcare – Too Risky To Adopt Yet Too Risky To Avoid

Social Media In Healthcare – Too Risky To Adopt Yet Too Risky To Avoid | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
15 Apr 2014 - United Kingdom - Food, Drugs, Healthcare, Life Sciences - Social Media In Healthcare – Too Risky To Adopt Yet Too Risky To Avoid - Deloitte - The Internet has not only changed the way people communicate, it has become a powerful and important resource for health information.
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Wearable Technology in Urology - BJUI

Wearable Technology in Urology - BJUI | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
Dr. Brian Stork looks at wearable technology trends in urology. Physicians and patients will need to work together to understand quantified self data
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Why blocking social media is not the answer: a doctor's point of view

Why blocking social media is not the answer: a doctor's point of view | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it

Edwin Kuys writes on the 'Doctor's Bag' blog:

 

"I am a strong proponent of open access to social media. I feel the decision to block staff access to e.g. LinkedIn or YouTube is often ill-advised, and it’s not beneficial to organisations in the long run.

 

Many times I’ve heard the following reasons for restricting social media usage at work: “We don’t want our staff to be distracted.” And: “They shouldn’t waste their time on social media.” Other reasons may include perceived cyber risks or the cost of excess data usage.

 

Any organisation that blocks social media sites may send out one or more of the following messages:

 

We don’t really understand what social media is all aboutWe don’t trust our staffEven though consumers are using social media for health purposes, we’re not interested

 

Admittedly, this is probably unintentional. In most cases decision makers are probably unfamiliar with social media and may see it as a threat.

Here are five reasons why health care staff should have access to LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, Blogs etc…Social networks are powerful learning tools for staffSocial media are increasingly used as health promotion tools (e.g. embedded YouTube videos)Shared knowledge accessible via social media will assist staff in finding answers and making better decisionsInteractions with peers and thought leaders increases work satisfaction (and will contribute to staff retention)Participating in social media and other new technologies will raise the (inter)national profile of an organisation"


Via Andrew Spong, Anneliz Hannan
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The Expanding Web of Clinical Trial Patient Recruitment

The Expanding Web of Clinical Trial Patient Recruitment | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it

It is a poorly kept secret in the world of clinical trials that issues with patient recruitment and enrollment are the primary causes for missing clinical trial timelines.  Most of us have seen the data. We know that for each day a company goes beyond the planned deadline for a clinical trial, that company could be losing as much as $600,000 in foregone sales of smaller products and as much as $8 million on blockbuster drugs. As necessity is the mother of invention, it comes as no surprise that sponsors and CROs are looking to any and all means by which to increase the rate of patient enrollment.

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Disease Outbreak Warnings Via Social Media Sought by U.S.

Disease Outbreak Warnings Via Social Media Sought by U.S. | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
Whooping cough first sickened the Illinois high school cheerleaders, then it struck the football players, the cross-country team and the band.
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Quality of patient health information on the Internet: reviewing a complex and evolving landscape

Quality of patient health information on the Internet: reviewing a complex and evolving landscape | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it

The popularity of the Internet has enabled unprecedented access to health information. As a largely unregulated source, there is potential for inconsistency in the quality of information that reaches the patient.

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Listen to the Internet: The Patient Communication Opportunity

Listen to the Internet: The Patient Communication Opportunity | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it

Every minute, an estimated 200,000,000 emails are being sent, 200,000 search queries are being typed into Google, and nearly 700,000 new pieces of content are being added to Facebook. 

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Can Twitter save lives?

Can Twitter save lives? | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
It seems to me the most compelling reason NHS Wales staff are on Twitter is the potential for actually saving lives.
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Doctors Going Mobile, But Still Skeptical of Connected Health

Doctors Going Mobile, But Still Skeptical of Connected Health | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
At least two-thirds of American doctors surveyed use mobile-health apps on the job. But about two-thirds also think a truly connected healthcare system in
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The social media 'cure'

The social media 'cure' | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
In England, a physician terminally ill with cancer has turned to social media to chronicle her view from both sides of the bedside and to try to improve the health care system for patients.
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What do patients expect from mHealth?

What do patients expect from mHealth? | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it

Patients expect mHealth to change their healthcare experience.
Expectations are high, but do they truly know what mHealth is?
And what is it that the general public is really expecting it to do?

Defining mHealth ::
mHealth is defined by Price Waterhouse Cooper as, the provision of healthcare or health-related information through the use of mobile devices (typically mobile phones, but also other specialised medical mobile devices, like wireless monitors). Mobile applications and services can include, among other things, remote patient monitors, video conferencing, online consultations, personal healthcare devices, wireless access to patient records and prescriptions.

Here are some facts discovered by a recent PWC mHealth survey ::

59% of patients expect mHealth to change how they seek information on health issues51% of patients expect mHealth to change how providers send general healthcare information49% of patients expect mHealth to change how they will manage their overall health48% of patients expect mHealth to change how they will manage their chronic conditions48% of patients expect mHealth to change how they will communicate with their healthcare providers48% of patients expect mHealth to change how they will manage their medication46% of patients expect mHealth to change how healthcare providers monitor condition and compliance

As you can see expectations are high … here hoping we can deliver!


Via Dinesh Chindarkar
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How Pharmaceutical Firms Are Using Social Media to Speak to Patients

How Pharmaceutical Firms Are Using Social Media to Speak to Patients | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it

Historically, the pharmaceutical industry has been a little slow on the uptake when it comes to the adoption of online marketing. But things are changing. In particular, pharma companies are embracing social media as they seek new, effective ways of helping the people using their products gain valuable information and, in turn, build their brand.

Much of the reason for this is that people have become digitally-savvy, as well as digitally-demanding. Research by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, for example, shows that 80% of internet users in the USA – about 93 million Americans – have searched for a health-related topic online.

There is a wealth of healthcare information available on the web. Whether it is reliable or not is open to debate; nevertheless, the research demonstrates just how important the internet is in the sphere of healthcare.

Into this space steps the pharmaceutical firm. Increasingly, drug manufacturers and healthcare providers are moving social media to the centre stage of their business models as they come to recognise its power in engaging patients.

A new report from the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics, one of the most wide-ranging analyses of the social media activities of some of the largest pharmaceutical brands, shows that nearly half of pharmaceutical manufacturers are now actively using social to engage with patients on healthcare-related topics.

Key findings:

Twenty-three of the top 50 pharmaceutical companies worldwide are now actively using social media – on Facebook, Twitter or YouTube – to engage with patientsBut only 10 are using all three services for healthcare-related topicsTwitter is used by 22 of the 50 companies studied, YouTube by 17 companies and Facebook by 15 companiesOf the ten pharmaceutical companies that were active across these three channels, Johnson & Johnson was ranked the bestThe overall level of engagement between pharmaceutical companies and patients has steadily increased over the past yearWikipedia is the single leading source of medical information for patients and healthcare professionals

‘Relevant, accurate content’

“Increasingly, patients are turning to social media as an essential forum for obtaining and sharing information related to their health,” explained Murray Aitken, IMS executive director.

“This trend only heightens the need for relevant, accurate content that can be accessed and used throughout the patient journey. Healthcare professionals, regulators and pharmaceutical manufacturers all need to acknowledge the vital role they can and should play as participants in the healthcare conversation.”

Tips for pharma firms starting out on social mediaStart with strategy

A plan of action is crucial to any social media activity. Start by defining your goals. What do you want to do on social? What do you want to accomplish?

Be human – tell stories

Health is a human issue, so offer stories on social media that engage with people. This could be links to case studies, personal blogs or interviews with experts.

Consider translated content

The most successful pharmaceutical companies are global ones. If you are expanding into new markets, consider offering translated social media content to effectively communicate with your new customers.

Pay attention to regulations

Remember that there are restrictions governing the type of marketing activity pharmaceutical companies can offer. Ensure you are up-to-date with regulations.

Start to review and audit

As your social media activity develops, it is crucial that you measure its success. Start analysing your content – see what works and what doesn’t, and make any necessary changes.

 


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Effect of Social Media on Healthcare

This is one of the largest influences associated with social media on healthcare. As Well As this ca...

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Wearable Devices Won't Succeed On The Mass Market Until More Apps Become Available

Wearable Devices Won't Succeed On The Mass Market Until More Apps Become Available | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
Despite all the new wearables on the market, there still aren’t many apps in these devices’ app stores. And without apps, there’s not a great reason for mainstream consumers to adopt the devices.
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A Conversation Between a Futurist and ePatient | HealthWorks Collective

A Conversation Between a Futurist and ePatient | HealthWorks Collective | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
Fard Johnmar, a digital health futurist, and I came up with an interesting idea: why not hold a public conversation focused around the following, provocative question: Is digital health helping or failing patients?
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Infographic: Cancer patients use of the internet for medical information

Infographic: Cancer patients use of the internet for medical information | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
Infographic: #Cancer patient us of the internet for medical information

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Deborah Fenlon's curator insight, April 16, 5:27 PM

Plenty of older people on the net!

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Privacy Threats When Seeking Online Health Information

Privacy Threats When Seeking Online Health Information | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
Patients increasingly use the Internet to access health-related information for which they are not charged.1 In turn, websites gather information from those who browse their sites and target advertisements to them. Yet this business model masks a more complicated picture. A patient who searches on a “free” health-related website for information related to “herpes” should be able to assume that the inquiry is anonymous. If not anonymous, the information knowingly or unknowingly disclosed by the patient should not be divulged to others.
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Are Hackathons the Future of Medical Innovation?

Are Hackathons the Future of Medical Innovation? | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it

Doctors can look inside you with magnetic fields and pill-mounted cameras. They use robots to perform surgeries and lasers to fix your vision. And yet, in so many other ways, the field of medicine seems stuck in the past. Doctors carry pagers. 

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Liberating the literature: Evidence-based tweeting

Liberating the literature: Evidence-based tweeting | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
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Harnessing the Power of the Digital Patient in the Clinical Development Process

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Gaining Perspective on Patient Engagement Through Social Media

Gaining Perspective on Patient Engagement Through Social Media | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
Healthcare Informatics Magazine | Health IT | Information Technology,Health care information technology & IT strategy news for CIOs, CMIOs & clinical informaticists. Learn about EMR EHR, ARRA HITECH, wireless technologies & meaningful use policy. Articles on patient safety, point-of-care tech & HIE analysis. Electronic medical records, health information exchange networks & hospital administration – financial – imaging news. Ambulatory care and business management info. Free Webinars and industry conferences.

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Patients want more services, online outreach from pharma | mobihealthnews

Patients want more services, online outreach from pharma | mobihealthnews | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it
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Nearly three-quarters of prescription-takers use mobile apps, including most older adults and seniors

Nearly three-quarters of prescription-takers use mobile apps, including most older adults and seniors | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it

Most patients taking prescription medicine (72%) also use mobile apps (Android smartphone, iPhone, Android tablet, iPad, or Kindle Fire),

Mobile app adoption rates are high across all medication-taking adult age groups: 93% (age 18-24), 90% (age 25-34), 88% (age 35-44), 80% (age 45-54), 66% (age 55-64), and 50% (age 65+),

App-using patients prefer the privacy-protected single app Mobile Health Library (MHL) system (by a factor of 11 to 1) over email programs often offered by medication manufacturers.  This high preference for a privacy-protected single app, customized to a user's needs for medication education and support services, was observed across all adult age groups.


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Dr Martin Wale's curator insight, April 8, 8:05 AM

I've not been able to verify the funding source for this research, so it could just be marketing.  If you know, please comment.  Thanks!

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The Role of Social Media in Recruiting for Clinical Trials in Pregnancy

The Role of Social Media in Recruiting for Clinical Trials in Pregnancy | Health Care Social Media Monitor | Scoop.it

AbstractBackgroundRecruitment of women in the periconceptional period to clinical studies using traditional advertising through medical establishments is difficult and slow. Given the widespread use of the internet as a source for medical information and research, we analyze the impact of social media in the second phase of an ongoing randomized, open-label clinical trial among pregnant women. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of social media as a recruitment tool through the comparison of diverse recruitment techniques in two different phases of the trial.MethodsRecruitment in Phase 1 of the study consisted solely of traditional healthcare-based sources. This was compared to Phase 2 of the study where traditional recruitment was continued and expanded, while social media was used as a supplementary source. Yearly recruitment and recruitment rates in the two phases were compared using the Mann Whitney U test. The contributions of each recruitment source to overall recruitment were analyzed, and the impact of potential confounders on recruitment rate was evaluated using a multiple regression and Interrupted Time Series Analysis.ResultsIn the first phase of the study, with over 56 months of recruitment using traditional sources, 35 women were enrolled in the study, resulting in a mean rate of ±0.62 recruits/month. In the 6 months implementing recruitment through social media, 45 women were recruited, for a 12-fold higher rate of ±7.5 recruits/month. Attrition rates remained constant, suggesting that social media had a positive impact on recruitment. The Interrupted Time Series Analysis detected a significant difference in recruitment after the intervention of social media (p<0.0001) with an evident increase in the number of recruits observed after the use of social media.ConclusionsClinicians and scientists recruiting for clinical studies should learn how to use online social media platforms to improve recruitment rates, thus increasing recruitment efficiency and cost-effectiveness.


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