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Mediocrity! - Our New Corporate Policy | DOUGLAS E. CASTLE - The Daily Burst Of Brilliance™

Mediocrity! - Our New Corporate Policy | DOUGLAS E. CASTLE - The Daily Burst Of Brilliance™ | Social Media | Scoop.it
Douglas Castle's insight:

If I had some insight, I might've written a better article.

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Former Governor Jim Gilmore: Internet Sales Tax Hurts Small Businesses - Heritage.org (blog)

Former Governor Jim Gilmore: Internet Sales Tax Hurts Small Businesses - Heritage.org (blog) | Social Media | Scoop.it
Heritage.org (blog) Former Governor Jim Gilmore: Internet Sales Tax Hurts Small Businesses Heritage.org (blog) The misnamed Marketplace Fairness Act (MFA), commonly called the Internet sales tax, recently passed the Senate and awaits action in the...
Douglas Castle's insight:

This former "empty suit" (no disrespect intended) politico is showing signs of dawning intellect. You can no more easily tax your way out of a recession than you can borrow your way out of debt. Perhaps Former Governor Gilmore should have a conversation with Mr. Bernanke in the interest of sparking some common sense when it comes to the responsible utilization of monetary and fiscal policy tools.

 

What is needed is a stimulus to small business, tax incentives to start-ups and new technology ventures (especially where jobs may be created), equity crowdfunding and vigorous export incentives, student loan foregiveness, and a rebirth of the Investment Tax Credit, The R and D Tax Credit and a return to the notion of increased productivity being ultimately better than aggressive government manipulation and printing reams of money -- very little, by the way, of which is ever seen by consumers, small businesses or the entrepreneurial sector per se.

 

You've made me happy, Gilmore.

 

- Douglas E. Castle

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Infographic: The Case for Mobile Optimization - Marketing Technology Blog

Infographic: The Case for Mobile Optimization - Marketing Technology Blog | Social Media | Scoop.it

Mobile optimization is changing not only how people communicate with each other, but how they live, work and shop. 

 

As you may already know, the growth of mobile device use has spread like wildfire in recent years. Experts believe the number of mobile devices will reach 7.3 billion by 2014, confirming there’s a mobile revolution underway. For marketers, it’s fight or flight: you either embrace mobility and adapt your online strategy to fit a multi-screen world, or surrender your weapons and suffer a slow, but sure demise.

 

According to Mashable, 2013 is “the year of responsive website design,” further driving the need for websites and apps to be optimized for any and all screen sizes. With 90% of people using multiple screens sequentially, and 67% of shoppers starting on one device and completing their purchase on another, the need for a fluid experience is vital.

 

Here’s a full look at the data via Get Satisfaction:




Via Russ Merz, Ph.D.
Douglas Castle's insight:

I must agree. The sequential use by consumers (whether individuals or businesses) of various mobile media, such as tablets, smartphones and the occasional notebook or other networked and fully-uplinked device has made it essential for all webmasters to be certain that every web-based site is rapidly responsive and conforming to all of the devices likely to be used, and that where this is not completely practical, alternative mini- or micro-sites are created which cater to each type (by general category) of device for the most critical functions of the site. We are increasingly seeing sites being designed specifically for mobile users, as opposed to traditional web-based designs being retrofitted to be mobile-friendly. While we're all in a state of transition (and training), we're going to see all types of accommodating combinations for multiple device users until true fluidity can be established.

 

Ultimately, true fluidity will require an increase in the inherent intelligence (in a limited sense of that latter expression) for the "transmitter" to "sense" the nature of the device which is being used to access it.

 

-- Douglas E. Castle

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