Social Media and healthcare
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Healthcare professionals' use of digital channels has positive impact on prescription intention

“BOULOGNE-BILLANCOURT CEDEX, France, Oct.”
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8 Essential Social Media Tools Doctors Should Be Using Right Now - Healthcare Global

“8 Essential Social Media Tools Doctors Should Be Using Right Now - Healthcare Global |”
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Social media guidelines - NHS Employers - Linkis.com

Social media guidelines - NHS Employers - Linkis.com | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“Here are some links to various regulators and professional bodies' social media guidelines.”
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New Social Media Training Course for Health Care Providers Available Online - EIN News (press release)

New Social Media Training Course for Health Care Providers Available Online - EIN News (press release) | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“New Social Media Training Course for Health Care Providers Available Online. Press release distribution provided by EIN News”
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Facebook would like your health data | Healthcare IT News

Facebook would like your health data | Healthcare IT News | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
Add Facebook to the list of Silicon Valley technology companies looking for ways to make personal health data a new part of their growth strategy. Like Apple and Google, the social network is said to be developing wellness apps and health discussion groups for its 1.3 billion users. [See also: Facebook users balk at sharing PHI] A request for comment to its Menlo Park, Calif. headquarters was not immediately returned, but Reuters has reported that "three people familiar with the matter" say Facebook is eyeing new online "support communities" meant to connect users with specific health conditions and allow them to compare notes. Another development team is said to be working on "preventative care" apps that would help users work toward developing more health lifestyles, according to the article. [See also: Facebook app to help track how viruses spread] Facebook has been meeting with "medical industry experts and entrepreneurs, and is setting up a research and development unit to test new health apps," Reuters reports – adding that the company is still in the "idea-gathering stage." Interestingly – especially as healthcare as a whole grapples with tools and strategies to better engage patients with their care – the article says one of Facebook's main motivations for this new health-centric strategy is that it sees it as a way to "increase engagement with the site." (Facebook could be facing a steep drop-off in its customer base in the coming years, some researchers have predicted.) As with anything regarding Facebook, there are many questions that would have to be answered about the privacy implications of initiatives like these. The site's livelihood depends on selling user data to advertisers, after all. Even though Facebook has recently changed its policy that accounts must be set up using real names, even with an alias, users discussing sensitive health data "would need anonymity and an assurance that their data and comments wouldn't be shared with their online contacts, advertisers, or pharmaceutical companies," the Reuters report points out. On social media, the response to this news has been mixed. "Not sure I like this," wrote one user on Twitter. "FB can't be all things." "Facebook is moving into healthcare," tweeted another. "Run for the hills." "I assume a Facebook-run health care service would periodically rearrange your body without asking," joked a third, slyly referencing Facebook's notoriously evolving privacy policy. Their skepticism isn't unfounded. As this Think Progress report puts it, "Facebook’s history of mining consumer’s personal data for better ads or just to learn more about its users could become a problem when it comes to health issues." Facebook has repeatedly "admitted to using controversial tactics, such as digging through users' statuses and one-on-one messages to tailor the ads it displays," the story reminds us. With HIPAA's health data protections much more robust than those for consumer data, Facebook would be swimming in far different waters than it's used to. As an example of the social network's missteps when it comes to personal health, ThinkProgress points to the psychological experiments – performed unknowingly on some 700,000 Facebook users – meant to gauge their reactions to posts with positive and negative connotations On Oct. 2, Facebook offered a mea culpa, of sorts, for that research. "Although this subject matter was important to research, we were unprepared for the reaction the paper received when it was published and have taken to heart the comments and criticism," wrote Facebook Chief Technology Officer Mike Schroepfer. "It is clear now that there are things we should have done differently." He added: "We’re committed to doing research to make Facebook better, but we want to do it in the most responsible way."
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Survey: Should Pharma Hire Online "Patient Opinion Leaders"?

Survey: Should Pharma Hire Online "Patient Opinion Leaders"? | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
This survey asks YOUR opinion about best practices that you think should govern pharma's collaboration with online "Patient Opinion Leaders" (POLs) and whether or not it is necessary for the pharmaceutical industry to develop public guidelines for interactions with patients online and, if so, what issues those guidelines should address. The pharmaceutical industry has a long tradition of working with individual patients and patient organizations. Sometimes the goal is to promote a specific product, but more often the goal is to raise awareness about a disease or medical condition for which the company has a specific Rx treatment. Pharma companies have hired patients as spokespeople (see "Behrman Wasn't the First Patient Spokesperson Paid Big Bucks By BMS"), given grants to patient advocacy groups (see "Pharma Dollars (Pounds, Euros) are Grassroots Seeds"), recruited individual patients to participate in market research focus groups (see "Levitra Market Research: The Interview"), and now may be hiring individual patients to monitor, moderate, or participate in online patient forums (see "J&J Agents Trolling for Adverse Events on the Internet"). Some patients welcome this collaboration with pharma and have been very vocal about the desire to be hired by pharmaceutical companies to help them moderate or manage online patient forums (see "Some Social Media Patient Opinion Leaders Want to be Paid Pharma Professionals"). This survey is an attempt to determine the issues involving transparency and conflicts of interest that may arise if and when pharma companies pay individual POLs to help manage their engagement with patients online. What best practices should govern pharma's collaboration with POLs? Should the industry develop guidelines for their interactions with POLs via social networks (eg, develop a "Patient Opinion Leader Transparency Policy")? Please take a few minutes to tell us YOUR opinion about best practices that you think should govern pharma's collaboration with POLs and whether or not it is necessary for the pharmaceutical industry to develop public guidelines for interactions with patients online and, if so, what issues those guidelines should address. Take the survey Now!
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The Death of the Patient: Moving from 'Healthcare' to 'Health' and 'Patient' to 'Person'

The Death of the Patient: Moving from 'Healthcare' to 'Health' and 'Patient' to 'Person' | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“Today, if you speak to anyone in the healthcare world, the discussion always begins and ends with making the change to a “patient centered care model” or putting the patient at the center of the care continuum.”
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Tracking the Impact of Clinical Trials on Social Media

Tracking the Impact of Clinical Trials on Social Media | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“While Pharma is still wondering how to harness Social Media, without opening the “pandora box” of adverse events, a number of specialized applications dedicated to the life sciences industry have”
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Social Media Week focuses on ‘Impact of Social Media in Healthcare Sector’

Social Media Week focuses on ‘Impact of Social Media in Healthcare Sector’ | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“RT @ExpHealthcare: #SocialMedia Week focuses on ‘Impact of Social Media in #healthcare Sector’ http://t.co/CL1DNNgaxq”
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WhatsAppDoc, TwitterDoc, FacebookDoc: The social media Revolution.

WhatsAppDoc, TwitterDoc, FacebookDoc: The social media Revolution. | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“"The future of Medical education is no longer blood and guts, it is bits and bytes." Gorman PJ. Gorman, a Stanford University scholar made that statement almost one and a half decades ago at the t...”
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Social Media Trends, Best Practices and Complia...

Social Media Trends, Best Practices and Complia... | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“Social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn are increasingly being used by health care organizations to engage with patients and physicians, build brands, and communicate information to the larger community.”
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Social media: a review and tutorial of ap... [J Med Internet Res. 2014] - PubMed - NCBI

“PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.”
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5 Social Media Trends Within Healthcare in 2014

5 Social Media Trends Within Healthcare in 2014 | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“Every year, social media increasingly integrates with almost every aspect of daily life. According to the Pew Research Center, 73 percent of adults online use some form of social media.”
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Social media guidelines - NHS Employers - Linkis.com

Social media guidelines - NHS Employers - Linkis.com | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“Here are some links to various regulators and professional bodies' social media guidelines.”
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The Perfect Storm of Social Media – Consumerization of Healthcare ... - Healthcare Social Media India

The Perfect Storm of Social Media – Consumerization of Healthcare ... - Healthcare Social Media India | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“Social media in healthcare faces the same hype cycle challenge. Certainly the entrance of LinkedIn (founded in 2002), Facebook (founded in 2006), and Twitt”
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Mayo Clinic Launches App with Apple HealthKit I...

Mayo Clinic Launches App with Apple HealthKit I... | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“On Thursday, Mayo Clinic launched its mobile health app with Apple HealthKit integration available to Mayo Clinic patients and the general public, VB first reports.”
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Social media and the Oncology Nurse

“How does social media fit into the ethical, legal and professional boundaries of oncology nursing? What are concerns and opportunities that an oncology nurse …”
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Hedge Funds Listen In on Patient Chats for Pharma Bets

Hedge Funds Listen In on Patient Chats for Pharma Bets | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“On the Internet, people talk about everything, even their illnesses. Now, Wall Street is listening.”
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Four Tips for Managing Your Hospital’s Website Content

Four Tips for Managing Your Hospital’s Website Content | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
Managing your hospital’s website is a big task. But if you break it up until little pieces, it’s a lot easier to get your mind wrapped around it. For starters, in order to manage your hospital’s content, you have to communicate with stakeholders in various departments, service lines, and within the communications and marketing departments. You know best how your organization works, and so it falls to you to develop a way of managing your content to keep it fresh and interesting. Here’s how you can get it done: Work within the marketing department to establish a process for content creation. Then, share that process with content stakeholders across the organization. Remember that processes can be modified. Be prepared to do so when needed. Establish a timeline for publishing content and share this timeline throughout the organization. This process works best when there is some “weight” behind it. If higher-ups are committed to the timeline, you can hold content stakeholders to the timeline—or push the publication of their content back, if necessary. Create a process for managing content updates. Determine who within each area is the contact for content updates and have a schedule for publishing updates. This schedule will need to be somewhat flexible to allow for unforeseen changes, so you might want to create a date range for updates. You’ll also need to have someone in the marketing department dedicated to this process that can check with content creators on timelines and manage versions of content. It’s best to develop the process as you go. That way, you’ll see what works, what doesn’t and then incorporate those details into the process. Remove stale, outdated content and content that doesn’t get any page views. Just like the other steps, this starts with a timeline or schedule. Plan on having content stakeholders review the content for their areas at least once a year. It’s a good idea to develop a checklist for this review process. The stakeholder can use it to review aspects of the content (such as page views and accuracy) and then can submit that checklist to the marketing department. This way, you can verify that the content is still fresh and the stakeholder actually reviewed the content.
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Social Media Integration for Healthcare Communications

Social Media Integration for Healthcare Communications | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
At one time, businesses could thrive and exist without utilizing social media. While some may still operate without it, those days are long gone. Social media integration is vital for strategic marketing plans and for increasing the bottom line. The more eyes are on the company, the better. As a result, there are a few different ways healthcare companies can include social media into their marketing plans. Healthcare companies aren’t known to have the most engagement on social media platforms. These tips should be used cohesively for maximum results and can change the way people interact with healthcare companies. Social Media integration is a now a prominent component to any Healthcare PR Strategy. High-Quality “Shareable” ContentAnyone can create high quality content. As a result, it is expected. To run with the big dogs, the least a company can do is provide compelling and relevant content to a target audience. In order to market to the crowds on Pinterest, Facebook or Instagram, utilize infographics or interesting photographs to gain attention. Cover a variety of topics in the health field to bring awareness and attach the company name to it all. For example, highlight the leading causes of heart disease in women in a captivating infographic. In addition, give tips on how to prevent heart disease. Run a series of these graphics during February (February is American Heart Month). Incorporate the company name through the sections that talk about solutions. Anything that can place the name in the minds of consumers is best. Giveaways/IncentivesGaining more followers means there are more eyeballs on the content. In order to encourage others to spread the word about the content, host contests with great giveaways. Make sure the giveaways are in line with the company’s goals. There are plenty of ways to do this. One option is to hold a contest where followers must tag the company in a post on their personal page and state their favorite way to consume their vegetables during the day for optimal health. The winner could receive a gift package with the company t-shirt, gift cards and a free physical. Make sure the gifts are nice enough to make followers want to enter and win! PartnershipsPartner with popular health-related social media celebrities. Sponsor ads on a popular health blog. Join forces with a well-known fitness guru who may have tons of followers on Instagram. Work out some type of sponsorship agreement for name placement to enhance awareness and marketability. Name placement is really important and getting the right people to endorse the company name can really help with the level of engagement received on social media. Keep in mind that different platforms require different types of engagement. The same strategies that work for Facebook won’t necessarily work for Instagram. Be willing to adapt to the different platforms to increase engagement and see the best results.
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Turning Intranets Social for Healthcare

Turning Intranets Social for Healthcare | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
One of the many complexities of Healthcare is balancing priorities to achieve business goals. How to treat patients as patients, not customers? How to meet technical, business, and clinical needs all at the same time? How to achieve provider and patient engagement? How to deliver a higher quality of care at a lower cost? The list goes on. Regardless of corporate priorities, resources at healthcare organizations have to balance their own responsibilities as well. The most successful organizations (or at least those in high-demand) seek to provide applications, services, and products to its employees that help them more efficiently operate in the business environment and drive higher engagement. There are many models, but some of the most successful embed “social” into daily operations. How? Enter the social intranet. While intranets have been around for a while, social ones have not. The goal of a social intranet at an organization is to establish a coordinated entry point to various streams of tailored information. Important: tailored. Further, this information does not solely have to be “informational.” Instead, if built with the right strategy and on a robust platform, this intranet can provide access to tools and services that allow resources to operate within their daily routine with limited disruption. Here’s a scenario in which it may work at a healthcare system: A doctor logs into their social intranet and reviews upcoming patient appointments revealing a brief profile about each patient. While completing this review, he scans the company twitter feed “Excited to be selected as ‘One of the Most Connected Healthcare Systems in the US’”. Good stuff. As he prepares for his first appointment, he notices that the credentialing status of a member of the surgery department has gone red. He clicks into the details and sees it’s an expired ABLS certificate and the medical staff office sent a note to the doctor to get the update. Cool, no risk there. The doctor checks his outstanding tasks; he forgot to write up interview notes for the new resident. The doctor navigates to the company directory to find the number for the hiring doctor and let him know he will get it done by end of day. The doctor checks the company calendar to confirm when the new wellness program is kicking off, those running shoes have seen better days. Before heading out the door, he quickly posts an answer to a chat feed requesting feedback on a newly acquired medical device. That’s where he starts and ends his day. That’s a lot of stuff. And yes, it’s all in one place. Various use cases can be applied to all sub-segments of the Healthcare industry. All of this controlled by security so that the information is tailored by job, role, location, or any other of a number of criteria, heavily configurable and branded. This is a social intranet. An intranet that does not disrupt daily activities, but instead enhances an employee’s ability to achieve self-service and perform their workflow with expanded efficiency. Of course, all applications that are utilized do not exist in the intranet, but establishing a social intranet as a lynch pin between various business units and activities can be extremely beneficial.
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Russia to Use Social Media in Fight Against Pseudoscience, Report Says | News

Russia to Use Social Media in Fight Against Pseudoscience, Report Says | News | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“The Russian government allotted 30 million rubles ($750,000) for a social media campaign to combat rampant pseudoscience, Izvestia reported Tuesday.”
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Globally, Pharma's Digital Spend is (Still) Only 6% of Total Promotional Budget

Globally, Pharma's Digital Spend is (Still) Only 6% of Total Promotional Budget | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
According to Cegedim Strategic Data (CSD) -- a provider of healthcare promotional audits -- in the last 6 months of 2013, the global pharma industry spent nearly $2.5 billion on all digital channels including pharma company websites, social media, web banner advertising in professional online journals and mobile apps. That works out to be approximately 6% of the total audited marketing expenditure, which includes "traditional, personal promotional channels;" i.e., sales reps.
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Social media evolution: Moving from individual to organizational goals

Social media evolution: Moving from individual to organizational goals | Social Media and healthcare | Scoop.it
“By Robert Fraser, RN (@RDJfraser) Social media has made the proverbial leap from a mythical sea creature to flip-flopping on land. Years ago the consumerization of technology and connectivity creat...”
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