Social media and education
7.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Social media and education
Social media and web 2.0 tools in education
Curated by Jack Patterson
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from 21st Century Tools for Teaching-People and Learners
Scoop.it!

To Get the Most Out of Tablets, Use Smart Curation

To Get the Most Out of Tablets, Use Smart Curation | Social media and education | Scoop.it
How might efforts to curate benefit from the portability and ubiquity of mobile devices? Tools like Evernote and GoodReads allow for easy and valuable curation. But the harder questions are pedagogical and curricular.

Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, June 12, 2013 12:35 PM

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Curation

 

MrBieb's curator insight, June 26, 2013 3:06 PM

Er staan een aantal links in die het vragen om even bekeken te worden.

Toch weer jammer dat Microsoft Office's onderdeel OneNote niet genoemd wordt. Daar de office pakketten op vrijwel alle pc's van jongeren staan vormt dit een zeer goed (gratis) alternatief voor Evernote.

Rescooped by Jack Patterson from 21st Century Information Fluency
Scoop.it!

Copyright, Ethics & Fair Use in Content Curation: Best Practices and Real-Word Examples

Copyright, Ethics & Fair Use  in Content Curation: Best Practices and Real-Word Examples | Social media and education | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good, Dennis T OConnor
more...
Andreas Kuswara's curator insight, February 28, 2013 4:09 AM

with the increase in mash-up content, the issues of IP such as this would need our attention and commonsense.

Media&Learning's curator insight, February 28, 2013 8:40 AM

Features, best practices, copyright, use and examples of content curation. Basically everything it is useful to know about content curation. Plenty of useful information.

Original scoop by Robin Good,

Author: Pawan Deshpande of Curata

Full guide: http://www.contentcurationmarketing.com/content-curation-copyright-ethics-fair-use

Mary Dawson's curator insight, June 21, 2013 4:39 PM

I am very aware of the fact that I am using a digital curation site to highlight external resources about images and Copyright and therefore it seems sensible to highlight some of the pitfalls of this approach.  I note that the Scoop.it example does not come out of this too well!

Rescooped by Jack Patterson from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Thinkers, Introverts and Curators in a Connected World: #Ideachat Open Mic

Thinkers, Introverts and Curators in a Connected World: #Ideachat Open Mic | Social media and education | Scoop.it
I think one of the fundamental changes in creativity in our new connected world is the voice of "new" thinkers, introverts and curators in the spread of ideas.
Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Gust MEES
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm?

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm? | Social media and education | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Evren Kiefer for Paper.li talking about a challenge we all face - information overload and how we streamline our diet. Or can we?


"Content doesn't have a season -- the feast is all year round" Overload or gluttony?

 

Here's what caught my attention:


“Information overload”, I hear you say, “we know that already”. Is it really the problem, though?


**As Clay Shirky argues in his talk “It’s Not Information Overload. It’s Filter Failure”, information overload is our new environment of plenty and not a problem that needs solving.


****It lies upon us to create internal and external filters to manage our time and attention because they are our most precious resources.


My commentary: I think this is most important for all of us, continually refining our ability to select only what we need and leave the rest. Today everyone is a publisher and everyone has an opinion. Aren't we suffering from meaning overwhelm as well?


I think it's essential to establish some criteria when you select content?


**What are you  looking to add to the original piece?


**Do you want to  create  clarity for others?


**Do you know the subject matter well enough to do this effectively?


**Do you want it to be thought-provoking?


**Do you want to add additional links and other resources who may have different points of view?.


As far as meaning overwhelm,


Everyone has an opinion, I think it's good to have a viewpoint but I think it's important to search for the simple thread in it that relates to your core message. 


It's also good to include others in the conversation because two heads are better than one, it helps people see the bigger picture and decide for themselves. That's why I'm asking you:


What are your thoughts? How are you dealing with this? I'd love to hear your comments.


Selected by Howard Rhinegold and  Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read Full article here: [http://bit.ly/wkij56]


Via Kelly Hungerford, Howard Rheingold, janlgordon
more...
Beth Kanter's comment, January 21, 2012 6:20 PM
BTW, I like how you frame the "meaning overwhelm." Even if we are power users of aggregation tools and newsmastering tools to bring us more on target content for our needs - we can still suffer from this.

It is the act of going back and forth between scanning quickly - and then going in for a deep dive and reflection. I watch the stream. I check things out and if I find something that is like "wow" - my audience would love this - or "wow" slightly different take or framing on the topic - then I add in my collection,think about it, and share.

The thing I'm trying to fight - in part because I curate many different topics. I tend to focus on different streams of keywords or sources for particular topics. But I might find something through serendipity that is on another topic I curate and it is good, but I'm not focusing on that topic now. So, sometimes I grab and have in a holding place until I look at it in more depth.

All this to ask you about:
What is your practice for curating multiple topics?
What do YOU do to avoid meaning overload?
janlgordon's comment, January 21, 2012 10:06 PM
Beth Kanter

For me, it all begins with managing my attention and establishing criteria for selecting content that aligns with my brand message and my purpose for being online. This is my compass. My focus for the day that fits this framework and everything flows from there. I love Howard Rhinegold’s work and the mindmap is brilliant. I’m finding these to be excellent resources in helping me to refine this process and I feel I'm definitely on the right track.


I have some quiet time before I ever go to the computer and focus on my agenda for the day. It’s like going into a library. Everything you could ever want is there but if you don’t have a hypothesis, you can drown in the sea of knowledge and information.

I cover lots of topics but there’s a recurring theme that connects them and it revolves around the evolving world of curation and the many forms it takes; how we have to learn to curate our selection not only of content and information but activity such as social networking as well. It's learning to manage my time and evaluate how I spend it. I ask myself if I do this, will it take me towards or away from my overall plan, the answer always gets me back to where I need to be.

As you know, we can schedule priorities and life comes charging in and sometimes I have to shift to do something that needs to be taken care of. Even if this happens, I can get back to my theme for the day at some point. I don't hold the reigns too tightly on this, it's just there to keep me grounded. If I find something as you say serendipitously and it’s off my daily plan, if it’s really a "wow", (again, here I've established some criteria for this, otherwise, I'd find many wows throughout the day), I stop and pay attention to it to see if it’s something I should work on. For me, there’s a certain rhythm to all of this and intuition plays a part. It takes practice and trusting yourself and not over-thinking things.

As for meaning overload, there are two things I will do If a piece is particularly heady or difficult to read, I will search for the simple thread that relates to the message I am seeking to put out to my audience. The other aspect is more simple. If I feel that my head is just too full, I have to step away for a few minutes, take a few deep breaths, maybe grab a drink of water. Sometimes meaning overload is just brain overload, and I really need to know when to step away and find my way back.
Kelly Hungerford's comment, January 22, 2012 10:16 AM
Thanks for sharing, Howard.
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm?

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm? | Social media and education | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Evren Kiefer for Paper.li talking about a challenge we all face - information overload and how we streamline our diet. Or can we?

 

"Content doesn't have a season -- the feast is all year round" Overload or gluttony?

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

“Information overload”, I hear you say, “we know that already”. Is it really the problem, though?

 

**As Clay Shirky argues in his talk “It’s Not Information Overload. It’s Filter Failure”, information overload is our new environment of plenty and not a problem that needs solving.

 

****It lies upon us to create internal and external filters to manage our time and attention because they are our most precious resources.

 

My commentary: I think this is most important for all of us, continually refining our ability to select only what we need and leave the rest. Today everyone is a publisher and everyone has an opinion. Aren't we suffering from meaning overwhelm as well?

 

I think it's essential to establish some criteria when you select content?

 

**What are you  looking to add to the original piece?

 

**Do you want to  create  clarity for others?

 

**Do you know the subject matter well enough to do this effectively?

 

**Do you want it to be thought-provoking?

 

**Do you want to add additional links and other resources who may have different points of view?.

 

As far as meaning overwhelm,

 

Everyone has an opinion, I think it's good to have a viewpoint but I think it's important to search for the simple thread in it that relates to your core message. 

 

It's also good to include others in the conversation because two heads are better than one, it helps people see the bigger picture and decide for themselves. That's why I'm asking you:

 

What are your thoughts? How are you dealing with this? I'd love to hear your comments.

 

Selected by Howard Rhinegold and  Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond

 

Read Full article here: [http://bit.ly/wkij56]


Via Kelly Hungerford, Howard Rheingold, janlgordon
more...
Beth Kanter's comment, January 21, 2012 6:20 PM
BTW, I like how you frame the "meaning overwhelm." Even if we are power users of aggregation tools and newsmastering tools to bring us more on target content for our needs - we can still suffer from this.

It is the act of going back and forth between scanning quickly - and then going in for a deep dive and reflection. I watch the stream. I check things out and if I find something that is like "wow" - my audience would love this - or "wow" slightly different take or framing on the topic - then I add in my collection,think about it, and share.

The thing I'm trying to fight - in part because I curate many different topics. I tend to focus on different streams of keywords or sources for particular topics. But I might find something through serendipity that is on another topic I curate and it is good, but I'm not focusing on that topic now. So, sometimes I grab and have in a holding place until I look at it in more depth.

All this to ask you about:
What is your practice for curating multiple topics?
What do YOU do to avoid meaning overload?
janlgordon's comment, January 21, 2012 10:06 PM
Beth Kanter

For me, it all begins with managing my attention and establishing criteria for selecting content that aligns with my brand message and my purpose for being online. This is my compass. My focus for the day that fits this framework and everything flows from there. I love Howard Rhinegold’s work and the mindmap is brilliant. I’m finding these to be excellent resources in helping me to refine this process and I feel I'm definitely on the right track.


I have some quiet time before I ever go to the computer and focus on my agenda for the day. It’s like going into a library. Everything you could ever want is there but if you don’t have a hypothesis, you can drown in the sea of knowledge and information.

I cover lots of topics but there’s a recurring theme that connects them and it revolves around the evolving world of curation and the many forms it takes; how we have to learn to curate our selection not only of content and information but activity such as social networking as well. It's learning to manage my time and evaluate how I spend it. I ask myself if I do this, will it take me towards or away from my overall plan, the answer always gets me back to where I need to be.

As you know, we can schedule priorities and life comes charging in and sometimes I have to shift to do something that needs to be taken care of. Even if this happens, I can get back to my theme for the day at some point. I don't hold the reigns too tightly on this, it's just there to keep me grounded. If I find something as you say serendipitously and it’s off my daily plan, if it’s really a "wow", (again, here I've established some criteria for this, otherwise, I'd find many wows throughout the day), I stop and pay attention to it to see if it’s something I should work on. For me, there’s a certain rhythm to all of this and intuition plays a part. It takes practice and trusting yourself and not over-thinking things.

As for meaning overload, there are two things I will do If a piece is particularly heady or difficult to read, I will search for the simple thread that relates to the message I am seeking to put out to my audience. The other aspect is more simple. If I feel that my head is just too full, I have to step away for a few minutes, take a few deep breaths, maybe grab a drink of water. Sometimes meaning overload is just brain overload, and I really need to know when to step away and find my way back.
Kelly Hungerford's comment, January 22, 2012 10:16 AM
Thanks for sharing, Howard.
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Curation Coming To Television and Film: Channelisation

Curation Coming To Television and Film: Channelisation | Social media and education | Scoop.it

"Jon Miller of News Corp may have predicted 2012 will see the "channelisation" of the web, but he really means a renewed focus on curation..."

 

"Channelisation implies that media corporations such as News Corp will be the ones controlling the playlist of content, but 2012 will see the role of such organisations fall back to providing content for others to turn into a wealth of different “channels” where the barrier to entry essentially falls to zero."

 

Key highlights curated from the article:

 

Curation of niche interest: channelisation

"...opening up of video on demand services from all these channels will allow much smaller organisations to provide cross-channel curation.

 

If the channels who provide the content are still showing their ads before, during and after each show, then curators could start channels focusing on more specific interests and smaller niches than a broadcast channel could do – there will be channels dedicated to crime shows, medical shows, shows with appearances from certain actors, and more.

 

A user will just have to think of a single genre or idea that they want to watch in a show, and there will be a “channel” or that."

 

 

The curator
"More interesting than the drive to smaller and smaller niches, which could, at least in part, be algorithmically generated – will be the focus on the curator.

 

If a user trusts the taste of a journalist, presenter, blogger or other figure – they may be more interested to watch the content that user picks than the content programmed for any particular channel.

 

...These curators could add to the content by providing commentary from their own knowledge of the content – offering a place where consumers could find a new love."

 

 

Social Curation
"...Equally, groups of curators could join together to offer more regular programming than the one-off playlists of individuals, basically creating “channels” without any of the budget and monetary constraints of a real channel.

 

They would not have to pay for licensing as the content owners will bundle ads with the in-stream content, and so people will curate out of love and interest rather than having to focus on budgetary constraints."

 

Insightful. 8/10

 

Read the full article here: http://www.techfruit.com/2012/01/12/channelisation-curation/ 

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

 Curated by Robin Good

 

Read full article here: [http://www.techfruit.com/2012/01/12/channelisation-curation/}


Via Robin Good, janlgordon
more...
janlgordon's comment, January 12, 2012 9:38 PM
This is great news! I feel like it's Christmas all over again - think of all the possibilities, especiaily the Social Curation where groups of curators get together to offer regular programming. This is my favorite part "so people will curate out of love and interest rather than having to focus on budgetary constraints." My head is spinning, so many ideas flooding my brain, I need to curate my thoughts:-)
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from SOCIAL MEDIA, what we think about!
Scoop.it!

40 Social Media Curation Sites and Tools

40 Social Media Curation Sites and Tools | Social media and education | Scoop.it

Last month I shared 40+ networks that you could consider depending on your niche or interests. As part of my commitment to this community, I shared that I will expand on this list througout 2012. So here is the first addition to that build! The topic- Curation!I thought I would focus on curation because a) I have a favorite site and b) there has been a lot of “press” on Pinterest as a curation tool and as a result I thought the timing was right. However before I list the sites lets talk curation.

 

What is social media curation?

 

Today, with the exponential growth of social networks and blogs, it can be overwhelming searching for information on the internet. As a result, the act of filtering, selecting, reviewing and providing commentary with a perspective on an article, or collection of articles, have become increasingly important. This is known as social media curation. Recently, I had posed the question : What is a social media curator” on Linkedin.

 

Read more: http://socialmediapearls.wordpress.com/2012/01/22/40-social-media-curation-sites-and-tools/


Via Shirley Williams (appearoo.com/ShirleyWilliams), Martin Gysler
more...
Shirley Williams (appearoo.com/ShirleyWilliams)'s comment, January 22, 2012 2:26 PM
Thanks Everyone for this feedback. Just wonderful.

Robin- absolutely appreciated the feedback. I did visit all the sites to ensure that they were still in operation however missed some very important details. So thank you so much for providing the clarification needed. :))
Carey Leahy's comment, January 22, 2012 11:56 PM
Martin you need to do a little of what the article says - add your own perspective! I read the info and thought you had written it until I went to the link.
Martin Gysler's comment, January 23, 2012 8:05 AM
Hi Carey, I consider scoop.it as a tool to provide interesting information and not really as a curation tool, but, maybe you're right and I should reconsider my opinion about my approach! Thank you for your feedback.
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Content Curation - Best Practices | E-Learning Council

Content Curation - Best Practices | E-Learning Council | Social media and education | Scoop.it

Content Curation - Best Practices

 

Content curation has become a hot topic in 2012.

 

Corrine Weisgerber, an associate professor at St. Edwards University, has an excellent presentation on content curation.

 

She differentiates content curation from content aggregation--content aggregation can be automated but content curation requires the human touch for finding, evaluating and contextualizing information.

 

Gust MEES: Corinne is from Luxembourg (Europe), my country, don't know Luxembourg? Check out my curation about Luxembourg here: http://www.scoop.it/t/luxembourg-europe


Via Gust MEES
more...
Jenny Pesina's comment, January 12, 2012 9:28 PM
Great find, Gust - Corrine makes some great points on giving your own opinion on what you find and establishing a PLN. Really enjoyed this one, thanks!
Gust MEES's comment, January 12, 2012 10:39 PM
@JennyP,

Thanks Jenny, much appreciated your comment :)
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

30+ Cool Content Curation Tools for Personal & Professional Use

30+ Cool Content Curation Tools for Personal & Professional Use | Social media and education | Scoop.it
As the web becomes more and more inundated with blogs, videos, tweets, status updates, news, articles, and countless other forms of content, "information over

Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
Guy Garey's curator insight, March 14, 2013 2:29 AM

This item details some of the sites and means by which the massive amount of news can be filtered. Yes, Scoop.it is there, but so are lots of other ways and means that yield similar results. Any of a number of these plans are things that I would find useful. Maybe a content curation scheme is needed for curation schemes?

Vincenzo Storti's curator insight, March 14, 2013 2:41 PM

Per gli specialisti di marketing, i migliori tools di content curation.

Jorge Rubio Navarro's curator insight, March 16, 2013 6:08 AM

Si quieres saber cual es la mejor herramienta en tu estrategia de Content Marketing aquí desde luego tienes por donde empezar. 

Rescooped by Jack Patterson from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

4 Reasons Why Content Curation Has Gone Mainstream - Forbes

4 Reasons Why Content Curation Has Gone Mainstream - Forbes | Social media and education | Scoop.it
Pawan Deshpande Guest post written by Pawan Deshpande Pawan Deshpande is CEO of Curata.

Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from Marketing and Digital Communication
Scoop.it!

Curation Tools: The Amsterdam-Born Pinterest Look-Alike for Hip and Cool Stuff - 20Blinks

"...20blinks gives content curation a heady, Dutch twist.

 

If Pinterest opened people's eyes to the joys of content curation, 20blinks unleashes their souls.

 

Supposedly, 20Blinks is a place for sharing and appreciating the finer, funkier things across cultures.

 

Like an ambient content curation platform, 20blinks is dedicated to sharing all things hip.

 

Many of the collections are a delightful trip. It's a mind-blowing place for sharing and discovery of:

- New music and classic grooves
- Contemporary art and photography
- Buzz-worthy books
- Exotic travel inspiration
- Fresh fashion and much more."

(Source: Yahoo - http://voices.yahoo.com/http://voices.yahoo.com/20blinks-hip-social-network-content-curation-10846363.html?cat=15)  

 

Try it out now: http://www.20blinks.com/ ;


Via Robin Good, PatriAnnaD
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

55% of Shoppers Are Uncomfortable Giving Credit Card Info to Social Networks #Infographic

55% of Shoppers Are Uncomfortable Giving Credit Card Info to Social Networks #Infographic | Social media and education | Scoop.it

By Todd Wasserman  - http://bit.ly/yuVgSx

Social networks attempting to execute commerce on their sites might face some resistance, according to a new survey.

...

Despite the prevalence of social networks, consumers are still queasy about oversharing when it comes to credit card info.

That, at least, is the crux of an online survey executed by digital marketing firm Digitas and conducted by Harris Interactive in early January. Canvassing 2,247 would-be online shoppers, showed a slight majority weren’t ready to use Facebook et al. as a buying platform.

Predictably, older and richer consumers were even less apt to share such data.

 

Other factoids that emerged in the survey: People are spending almost as much time accessing social networks via their mobile devices as they do via their PCs. (Perhaps that’s not so astonishing, since other surveys have showed time on mobile devices eclipsing PC time.)

 

Another data point may be more surprising: Baby Boomers aged 45-54 — especially males — use their mobile device to access social networks more than 18-44 year-olds.


Via maxOz, janlgordon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Will Pinterest Lead The Way & Transform the Web in 2012?

Will Pinterest Lead The Way & Transform the Web in 2012? | Social media and education | Scoop.it

I am updating this post because I now have my own experience of this exciting new way of connecting with my audience.  Brands are communicating with consumers in whole new ways. Pinterest is still by invite only, will let you know when it goes public. Be sure to stay tuned and follow the latest trends, reviews, news and developments in social curation on my new topic "PINEREST WATCH" .

 

I selected this post written by Elad Gil because not only was it interesting and timely, but the comments from his readers were equally as valuable. So many different social curation platforms emerging, Pinterest is one to watch.......

 

Excerpt:

 

Social Content Curation As The Next Big Thing

 

The most interesting wave hitting the social web in 2012 is social curation. This was kicked off in 2011 as Pinterest's growth was noticed by Silicon Valley and a number of companies quickly followed suit -

 

**Snip.It launched as a social information curation platform, Quora adopted boards for a similar purpose, and Fab.com launched a structured social commerce feed.

 

There's so much information in this post, here's the takeaway. I would love to hear your comments about this next wave......

 

Takeaway:

 

2012 Will Be The Year of Curated Sets


**2012 will likely see an acceleration of structured, push button, social curation across the web. Why? Because most users don't want to take much effort to produce content, and consuming content in a structured manner (especially photos) is also much faster.

 

**Just as the first wave of social media has transformed the consumption of information, this next wave of social curation will fundamentally change how users find and interact with content over time.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/lK0ZHi]


Via janlgordon
more...
Tom George's comment, January 5, 2012 2:54 AM
Hey Jan,

It most definitely is. I thank you as well and I look forward to a great year of curating, learning and growing.
janlgordon's comment, January 5, 2012 3:25 AM
Internet Billboards
Absolutely Tom, it's going to be an exciting time!
maxOz's comment, January 20, 2012 2:58 AM
Jan, I have sent this scoop [error] didn't realize you had it xxx
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm?

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm? | Social media and education | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Evren Kiefer for Paper.li talking about a challenge we all face - information overload and how we streamline our diet. Or can we?

 

"Content doesn't have a season -- the feast is all year round" Overload or gluttony?

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

“Information overload”, I hear you say, “we know that already”. Is it really the problem, though?

 

**As Clay Shirky argues in his talk “It’s Not Information Overload. It’s Filter Failure”, information overload is our new environment of plenty and not a problem that needs solving.

 

****It lies upon us to create internal and external filters to manage our time and attention because they are our most precious resources.

 

My commentary: I think this is most important for all of us, continually refining our ability to select only what we need and leave the rest. Today everyone is a publisher and everyone has an opinion. Aren't we suffering from meaning overwhelm as well?

 

I think it's essential to establish some criteria when you select content?

 

**What are you  looking to add to the original piece?

 

**Do you want to  create  clarity for others?

 

**Do you know the subject matter well enough to do this effectively?

 

**Do you want it to be thought-provoking?

 

**Do you want to add additional links and other resources who may have different points of view?.

 

As far as meaning overwhelm,

 

Everyone has an opinion, I think it's good to have a viewpoint but I think it's important to search for the simple thread in it that relates to your core message. 

 

It's also good to include others in the conversation because two heads are better than one, it helps people see the bigger picture and decide for themselves. That's why I'm asking you:

 

What are your thoughts? How are you dealing with this? I'd love to hear your comments.

 

Selected by Howard Rhinegold and  Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond

 

Read Full article here: [http://bit.ly/wkij56]


Via Kelly Hungerford, Howard Rheingold, janlgordon
more...
Beth Kanter's comment, January 21, 2012 6:20 PM
BTW, I like how you frame the "meaning overwhelm." Even if we are power users of aggregation tools and newsmastering tools to bring us more on target content for our needs - we can still suffer from this.

It is the act of going back and forth between scanning quickly - and then going in for a deep dive and reflection. I watch the stream. I check things out and if I find something that is like "wow" - my audience would love this - or "wow" slightly different take or framing on the topic - then I add in my collection,think about it, and share.

The thing I'm trying to fight - in part because I curate many different topics. I tend to focus on different streams of keywords or sources for particular topics. But I might find something through serendipity that is on another topic I curate and it is good, but I'm not focusing on that topic now. So, sometimes I grab and have in a holding place until I look at it in more depth.

All this to ask you about:
What is your practice for curating multiple topics?
What do YOU do to avoid meaning overload?
janlgordon's comment, January 21, 2012 10:06 PM
Beth Kanter

For me, it all begins with managing my attention and establishing criteria for selecting content that aligns with my brand message and my purpose for being online. This is my compass. My focus for the day that fits this framework and everything flows from there. I love Howard Rhinegold’s work and the mindmap is brilliant. I’m finding these to be excellent resources in helping me to refine this process and I feel I'm definitely on the right track.


I have some quiet time before I ever go to the computer and focus on my agenda for the day. It’s like going into a library. Everything you could ever want is there but if you don’t have a hypothesis, you can drown in the sea of knowledge and information.

I cover lots of topics but there’s a recurring theme that connects them and it revolves around the evolving world of curation and the many forms it takes; how we have to learn to curate our selection not only of content and information but activity such as social networking as well. It's learning to manage my time and evaluate how I spend it. I ask myself if I do this, will it take me towards or away from my overall plan, the answer always gets me back to where I need to be.

As you know, we can schedule priorities and life comes charging in and sometimes I have to shift to do something that needs to be taken care of. Even if this happens, I can get back to my theme for the day at some point. I don't hold the reigns too tightly on this, it's just there to keep me grounded. If I find something as you say serendipitously and it’s off my daily plan, if it’s really a "wow", (again, here I've established some criteria for this, otherwise, I'd find many wows throughout the day), I stop and pay attention to it to see if it’s something I should work on. For me, there’s a certain rhythm to all of this and intuition plays a part. It takes practice and trusting yourself and not over-thinking things.

As for meaning overload, there are two things I will do If a piece is particularly heady or difficult to read, I will search for the simple thread that relates to the message I am seeking to put out to my audience. The other aspect is more simple. If I feel that my head is just too full, I have to step away for a few minutes, take a few deep breaths, maybe grab a drink of water. Sometimes meaning overload is just brain overload, and I really need to know when to step away and find my way back.
Kelly Hungerford's comment, January 22, 2012 10:16 AM
Thanks for sharing, Howard.
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from PINTEREST Watch - Curated by Jan Gordon & John van den brink
Scoop.it!

Pinterest- A Whole New Way of Engaging With Your Audience

Pinterest- A Whole New Way of Engaging With Your Audience | Social media and education | Scoop.it

Pinterest is a new way of engaging with your audience.  It's important to remember that each social network is a unique enviornment and that requires a different way of presenting content, allowing others to see different sides of you,  know who is behind your brand, what you stand for and find points of connection with you.


The other day I posted  'You Are What You Curate  -  That's Why Pinterest is so Hot' - It's a really great article and sets the tone for this new social network and how to be effective here.   http://bit.ly/xZKAM3 


Commentary by Jan Gordon covering ''Pinterest Watch'


Read more at http://pinterest.com/jangordon/


Via janlgordon
more...
No comment yet.