Social media and ...
Follow
Find tag "content-filtering"
7.1K views | +2 today
Social media and education
Social media and web 2.0 tools in education
Curated by Jack Patterson
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm?

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm? | Social media and education | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Evren Kiefer for Paper.li talking about a challenge we all face - information overload and how we streamline our diet. Or can we?


"Content doesn't have a season -- the feast is all year round" Overload or gluttony?

 

Here's what caught my attention:


“Information overload”, I hear you say, “we know that already”. Is it really the problem, though?


**As Clay Shirky argues in his talk “It’s Not Information Overload. It’s Filter Failure”, information overload is our new environment of plenty and not a problem that needs solving.


****It lies upon us to create internal and external filters to manage our time and attention because they are our most precious resources.


My commentary: I think this is most important for all of us, continually refining our ability to select only what we need and leave the rest. Today everyone is a publisher and everyone has an opinion. Aren't we suffering from meaning overwhelm as well?


I think it's essential to establish some criteria when you select content?


**What are you  looking to add to the original piece?


**Do you want to  create  clarity for others?


**Do you know the subject matter well enough to do this effectively?


**Do you want it to be thought-provoking?


**Do you want to add additional links and other resources who may have different points of view?.


As far as meaning overwhelm,


Everyone has an opinion, I think it's good to have a viewpoint but I think it's important to search for the simple thread in it that relates to your core message. 


It's also good to include others in the conversation because two heads are better than one, it helps people see the bigger picture and decide for themselves. That's why I'm asking you:


What are your thoughts? How are you dealing with this? I'd love to hear your comments.


Selected by Howard Rhinegold and  Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read Full article here: [http://bit.ly/wkij56]


Via Kelly Hungerford, Howard Rheingold, janlgordon
more...
Beth Kanter's comment, January 21, 2012 10:20 AM
BTW, I like how you frame the "meaning overwhelm." Even if we are power users of aggregation tools and newsmastering tools to bring us more on target content for our needs - we can still suffer from this.

It is the act of going back and forth between scanning quickly - and then going in for a deep dive and reflection. I watch the stream. I check things out and if I find something that is like "wow" - my audience would love this - or "wow" slightly different take or framing on the topic - then I add in my collection,think about it, and share.

The thing I'm trying to fight - in part because I curate many different topics. I tend to focus on different streams of keywords or sources for particular topics. But I might find something through serendipity that is on another topic I curate and it is good, but I'm not focusing on that topic now. So, sometimes I grab and have in a holding place until I look at it in more depth.

All this to ask you about:
What is your practice for curating multiple topics?
What do YOU do to avoid meaning overload?
janlgordon's comment, January 21, 2012 2:06 PM
Beth Kanter

For me, it all begins with managing my attention and establishing criteria for selecting content that aligns with my brand message and my purpose for being online. This is my compass. My focus for the day that fits this framework and everything flows from there. I love Howard Rhinegold’s work and the mindmap is brilliant. I’m finding these to be excellent resources in helping me to refine this process and I feel I'm definitely on the right track.


I have some quiet time before I ever go to the computer and focus on my agenda for the day. It’s like going into a library. Everything you could ever want is there but if you don’t have a hypothesis, you can drown in the sea of knowledge and information.

I cover lots of topics but there’s a recurring theme that connects them and it revolves around the evolving world of curation and the many forms it takes; how we have to learn to curate our selection not only of content and information but activity such as social networking as well. It's learning to manage my time and evaluate how I spend it. I ask myself if I do this, will it take me towards or away from my overall plan, the answer always gets me back to where I need to be.

As you know, we can schedule priorities and life comes charging in and sometimes I have to shift to do something that needs to be taken care of. Even if this happens, I can get back to my theme for the day at some point. I don't hold the reigns too tightly on this, it's just there to keep me grounded. If I find something as you say serendipitously and it’s off my daily plan, if it’s really a "wow", (again, here I've established some criteria for this, otherwise, I'd find many wows throughout the day), I stop and pay attention to it to see if it’s something I should work on. For me, there’s a certain rhythm to all of this and intuition plays a part. It takes practice and trusting yourself and not over-thinking things.

As for meaning overload, there are two things I will do If a piece is particularly heady or difficult to read, I will search for the simple thread that relates to the message I am seeking to put out to my audience. The other aspect is more simple. If I feel that my head is just too full, I have to step away for a few minutes, take a few deep breaths, maybe grab a drink of water. Sometimes meaning overload is just brain overload, and I really need to know when to step away and find my way back.
Kelly Hungerford's comment, January 22, 2012 2:16 AM
Thanks for sharing, Howard.
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm?

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm? | Social media and education | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Evren Kiefer for Paper.li talking about a challenge we all face - information overload and how we streamline our diet. Or can we?

 

"Content doesn't have a season -- the feast is all year round" Overload or gluttony?

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

“Information overload”, I hear you say, “we know that already”. Is it really the problem, though?

 

**As Clay Shirky argues in his talk “It’s Not Information Overload. It’s Filter Failure”, information overload is our new environment of plenty and not a problem that needs solving.

 

****It lies upon us to create internal and external filters to manage our time and attention because they are our most precious resources.

 

My commentary: I think this is most important for all of us, continually refining our ability to select only what we need and leave the rest. Today everyone is a publisher and everyone has an opinion. Aren't we suffering from meaning overwhelm as well?

 

I think it's essential to establish some criteria when you select content?

 

**What are you  looking to add to the original piece?

 

**Do you want to  create  clarity for others?

 

**Do you know the subject matter well enough to do this effectively?

 

**Do you want it to be thought-provoking?

 

**Do you want to add additional links and other resources who may have different points of view?.

 

As far as meaning overwhelm,

 

Everyone has an opinion, I think it's good to have a viewpoint but I think it's important to search for the simple thread in it that relates to your core message. 

 

It's also good to include others in the conversation because two heads are better than one, it helps people see the bigger picture and decide for themselves. That's why I'm asking you:

 

What are your thoughts? How are you dealing with this? I'd love to hear your comments.

 

Selected by Howard Rhinegold and  Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond

 

Read Full article here: [http://bit.ly/wkij56]


Via Kelly Hungerford, Howard Rheingold, janlgordon
more...
Beth Kanter's comment, January 21, 2012 10:20 AM
BTW, I like how you frame the "meaning overwhelm." Even if we are power users of aggregation tools and newsmastering tools to bring us more on target content for our needs - we can still suffer from this.

It is the act of going back and forth between scanning quickly - and then going in for a deep dive and reflection. I watch the stream. I check things out and if I find something that is like "wow" - my audience would love this - or "wow" slightly different take or framing on the topic - then I add in my collection,think about it, and share.

The thing I'm trying to fight - in part because I curate many different topics. I tend to focus on different streams of keywords or sources for particular topics. But I might find something through serendipity that is on another topic I curate and it is good, but I'm not focusing on that topic now. So, sometimes I grab and have in a holding place until I look at it in more depth.

All this to ask you about:
What is your practice for curating multiple topics?
What do YOU do to avoid meaning overload?
janlgordon's comment, January 21, 2012 2:06 PM
Beth Kanter

For me, it all begins with managing my attention and establishing criteria for selecting content that aligns with my brand message and my purpose for being online. This is my compass. My focus for the day that fits this framework and everything flows from there. I love Howard Rhinegold’s work and the mindmap is brilliant. I’m finding these to be excellent resources in helping me to refine this process and I feel I'm definitely on the right track.


I have some quiet time before I ever go to the computer and focus on my agenda for the day. It’s like going into a library. Everything you could ever want is there but if you don’t have a hypothesis, you can drown in the sea of knowledge and information.

I cover lots of topics but there’s a recurring theme that connects them and it revolves around the evolving world of curation and the many forms it takes; how we have to learn to curate our selection not only of content and information but activity such as social networking as well. It's learning to manage my time and evaluate how I spend it. I ask myself if I do this, will it take me towards or away from my overall plan, the answer always gets me back to where I need to be.

As you know, we can schedule priorities and life comes charging in and sometimes I have to shift to do something that needs to be taken care of. Even if this happens, I can get back to my theme for the day at some point. I don't hold the reigns too tightly on this, it's just there to keep me grounded. If I find something as you say serendipitously and it’s off my daily plan, if it’s really a "wow", (again, here I've established some criteria for this, otherwise, I'd find many wows throughout the day), I stop and pay attention to it to see if it’s something I should work on. For me, there’s a certain rhythm to all of this and intuition plays a part. It takes practice and trusting yourself and not over-thinking things.

As for meaning overload, there are two things I will do If a piece is particularly heady or difficult to read, I will search for the simple thread that relates to the message I am seeking to put out to my audience. The other aspect is more simple. If I feel that my head is just too full, I have to step away for a few minutes, take a few deep breaths, maybe grab a drink of water. Sometimes meaning overload is just brain overload, and I really need to know when to step away and find my way back.
Kelly Hungerford's comment, January 22, 2012 2:16 AM
Thanks for sharing, Howard.
Rescooped by Jack Patterson from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm?

Can Content Curators Help With Content Overwhelm? | Social media and education | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Evren Kiefer for Paper.li talking about a challenge we all face - information overload and how we streamline our diet. Or can we?

 

"Content doesn't have a season -- the feast is all year round" Overload or gluttony?

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

“Information overload”, I hear you say, “we know that already”. Is it really the problem, though?

 

**As Clay Shirky argues in his talk “It’s Not Information Overload. It’s Filter Failure”, information overload is our new environment of plenty and not a problem that needs solving.

 

****It lies upon us to create internal and external filters to manage our time and attention because they are our most precious resources.

 

My commentary: I think this is most important for all of us, continually refining our ability to select only what we need and leave the rest. Today everyone is a publisher and everyone has an opinion. Aren't we suffering from meaning overwhelm as well?

 

I think it's essential to establish some criteria when you select content?

 

**What are you  looking to add to the original piece?

 

**Do you want to  create  clarity for others?

 

**Do you know the subject matter well enough to do this effectively?

 

**Do you want it to be thought-provoking?

 

**Do you want to add additional links and other resources who may have different points of view?.

 

As far as meaning overwhelm,

 

Everyone has an opinion, I think it's good to have a viewpoint but I think it's important to search for the simple thread in it that relates to your core message. 

 

It's also good to include others in the conversation because two heads are better than one, it helps people see the bigger picture and decide for themselves. That's why I'm asking you:

 

What are your thoughts? How are you dealing with this? I'd love to hear your comments.

 

Selected by Howard Rhinegold and  Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond

 

Read Full article here: [http://bit.ly/wkij56]


Via Kelly Hungerford, Howard Rheingold, janlgordon
more...
Beth Kanter's comment, January 21, 2012 10:20 AM
BTW, I like how you frame the "meaning overwhelm." Even if we are power users of aggregation tools and newsmastering tools to bring us more on target content for our needs - we can still suffer from this.

It is the act of going back and forth between scanning quickly - and then going in for a deep dive and reflection. I watch the stream. I check things out and if I find something that is like "wow" - my audience would love this - or "wow" slightly different take or framing on the topic - then I add in my collection,think about it, and share.

The thing I'm trying to fight - in part because I curate many different topics. I tend to focus on different streams of keywords or sources for particular topics. But I might find something through serendipity that is on another topic I curate and it is good, but I'm not focusing on that topic now. So, sometimes I grab and have in a holding place until I look at it in more depth.

All this to ask you about:
What is your practice for curating multiple topics?
What do YOU do to avoid meaning overload?
janlgordon's comment, January 21, 2012 2:06 PM
Beth Kanter

For me, it all begins with managing my attention and establishing criteria for selecting content that aligns with my brand message and my purpose for being online. This is my compass. My focus for the day that fits this framework and everything flows from there. I love Howard Rhinegold’s work and the mindmap is brilliant. I’m finding these to be excellent resources in helping me to refine this process and I feel I'm definitely on the right track.


I have some quiet time before I ever go to the computer and focus on my agenda for the day. It’s like going into a library. Everything you could ever want is there but if you don’t have a hypothesis, you can drown in the sea of knowledge and information.

I cover lots of topics but there’s a recurring theme that connects them and it revolves around the evolving world of curation and the many forms it takes; how we have to learn to curate our selection not only of content and information but activity such as social networking as well. It's learning to manage my time and evaluate how I spend it. I ask myself if I do this, will it take me towards or away from my overall plan, the answer always gets me back to where I need to be.

As you know, we can schedule priorities and life comes charging in and sometimes I have to shift to do something that needs to be taken care of. Even if this happens, I can get back to my theme for the day at some point. I don't hold the reigns too tightly on this, it's just there to keep me grounded. If I find something as you say serendipitously and it’s off my daily plan, if it’s really a "wow", (again, here I've established some criteria for this, otherwise, I'd find many wows throughout the day), I stop and pay attention to it to see if it’s something I should work on. For me, there’s a certain rhythm to all of this and intuition plays a part. It takes practice and trusting yourself and not over-thinking things.

As for meaning overload, there are two things I will do If a piece is particularly heady or difficult to read, I will search for the simple thread that relates to the message I am seeking to put out to my audience. The other aspect is more simple. If I feel that my head is just too full, I have to step away for a few minutes, take a few deep breaths, maybe grab a drink of water. Sometimes meaning overload is just brain overload, and I really need to know when to step away and find my way back.
Kelly Hungerford's comment, January 22, 2012 2:16 AM
Thanks for sharing, Howard.