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Marketing versus evidence-based medicine : The Lancet

The Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry has issued a new guideline1 to promote collaboration with doctors. It urges health-care professionals not to be “tempted to accept the negative myths about cooperating with industry”. Endorsed by many, including the British Medical Association, the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, and the Department of Health, among other major UK bodies, The Lancet's logo was used to support claims that “Industry plays a valid and important role in the provision of medical education” and that “Medical representatives can be a useful resource for healthcare professionals”
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Health promotion. Social marketing
Health promotion: marketing sociale, comunicazione, salute, ambiente, disuguaglianze sociali.
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Social marketing guide for public health programme managers and practitioners

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EvidenceLive 2015: l'Evidence Based Medicine si mette in discussione

EvidenceLive 2015: l'Evidence Based Medicine si mette in discussione | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Il 13-14 aprile si è tenuta una conferenza, organizzata dal Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine dell’Università di Oxford  in partnership con il BMJ, molto interessante. È il proposito esplicito di EvidenceLive a catturare la mia attenzione “We seek answers to the question: how can we transform healthcare for the better?“. Il mondo della medicina Evidence Based si interroga sul cambiamento e su se stessa.
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Sexuality: A Psychosocial Manifesto

Sexuality: A Psychosocial Manifesto | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

Author Katherine Johnson argues for a psychosocial approach that rethinks the relationship between psychic and social realms in the field of sexuality, without reducing it to either. Weaving through an expanse of theoretical and empirical examples drawn from sociology, psychology, queer and cultural studies, she produces an innovative, transdisciplinary perspective on sexual identities, subjectivities and politics. Alexander Blanchard argues that any student of sexuality will appreciate the vast wealth of sources which Johnson has compiled in this book. 

Sexuality: A Psychosocial Manifesto. Katherine Johnson. Polity. November 2014.

So far as sexuality plays a significant and intrinsic part in our lives (and the gradual permeation of feminism and queer theory into everyday ‘mainstream’ discourses should testify to this continued significance) then a manifesto which charts the psychological and the social aspects of sexuality is to be recommended reading for anyone who, so to speak, wishes to ‘know thyself’. However, within the academy the study of sexuality has reached something of a ‘conceptual impasse’ and has remained at that impasse for some time now. Briefly, there has been a “polarization between psychological and socio-historical accounts” of sexuality. Sexologists and psychologists tend to locate sexuality in biological origins, such as hormones or genetics, whilst historians and sociologists have taken sexuality as something originating from, and ascribed by, society.

As the polarization between these two positions has increased, so the communication between the two has been impeded (there has, in the past, been shared ground). In Sexuality: A Psychosocial Manifesto, Katherine Johnson deftly locates and weaves together the multifarious and complex positions found within both social constructivist and psychological approaches to sexuality. With a masterful grasp of the literature, a lucid, analytical prose, and considered self-awareness, Johnson challenges this conceptual impasse, imploring us to rethink the relationship between the psychic and social study of sexuality – all to excellent effect.

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Basta un treno per cambiare la vita di un bambino a Londra

Basta un treno per cambiare la vita di un bambino a Londra | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Si chiama Lives on the line ed è una mappa delle linee della metropolitana che racconta Londra con due statistiche fondamentali:l’aspettativa di vita e la povertà infantile (l’indice IDACI – Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index). Confrontando i due indici si ha un quadro di come, senza i margini per una aspirazione all’ascesa sociale, le sorti dei bambini che vivono nelle zone più povere di Londra potrebbero essere già segnate.
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Imaging in alcohol use disorders infographic | Progress in Mind: Focus on Alcohol Use Disorders Resource Centre

Imaging in alcohol use disorders infographic | Progress in Mind: Focus on Alcohol Use Disorders Resource Centre | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
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Making sense of health estimates - The Lancet

Making sense of health estimates - The Lancet | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

Epidemiological data provide the metrics from which burdens attributable to different diseases and conditions causing ill health can be estimated. Comprehensive, consistent, and coherent health estimates, together with information about any associated uncertainties, are indispensable for decision making by governments, non-governmental organisations, practitioners, and national and international funders in helping to gauge and track the changing demands and challenges presented by poor health. Estimates of disease burden are an essential platform for public health policy and priority setting, and for evaluating intervention programmes.

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Beyond Evidence-Based Policy in Public Health: The Interplay of Ideas by Katherine Smith

Beyond Evidence-Based Policy in Public Health: The Interplay of Ideas by Katherine Smith | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

In this book, Katherine Smith offers an insightful analysis of evidence-based policy, providing an interesting typology with which to deepen our exploration of the relationship between research and policy. Lee Gregory finds it a rare book which captures the reader, inviting self-reflection upon how one can engage with research either as an academic, an advocate, or policymaker, and their own research. 


Beyond Evidence-Based Policy in Public Health: The Interplay of Ideas. Katherine Smith. Palgrave Macmillan. October 2013.

Find this book: 

The advocacy of evidence-based policy (EBP) has grown in prominence for more than a decade, whilst attention to health inequalities in the UK has intensified somewhat since the publication of The Spirit Level. In this book Katherine Smith explores the relationship between the two, not only providing an interesting exploration of the role of EBP within public health, but also insight in the plight of the contemporary academic in a world of research impact.

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Marketing at 24 frames per Second - Medical Marketing and Media

Marketing at 24 frames per Second - Medical Marketing and Media | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Why health care brands need to start speaking in video, and how they can do it

Via Sam Stern
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Behavioral Economics: "Nudging" Underserved Populations to be Screened for Cancer

Abstract

Persistent disparities in cancer screening by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status require innovative prevention tools and techniques. Behavioral economics provides tools to potentially reduce disparities by informing strategies and systems to increase prevention of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers. With an emphasis on the predictable, but sometimes flawed, mental shortcuts (heuristics) people use to make decisions, behavioral economics offers insights that practitioners can use to enhance evidence-based cancer screening interventions that rely on judgments about the probability of developing and detecting cancer, decisions about competing screening options, and the optimal presentation of complex choices (choice architecture). In the area of judgment, we describe ways practitioners can use the availability and representativeness of heuristics and the tendency toward unrealistic optimism to increase perceptions of risk and highlight benefits of screening. We describe how several behavioral economic principles involved in decision-making can influence screening attitudes, including how framing and context effects can be manipulated to highlight personally salient features of cancer screening tests. Finally, we offer suggestions about ways practitioners can apply principles related to choice architecture to health care systems in which cancer screening takes place. These recommendations include the use of incentives to increase screening, introduction of default options, appropriate feedback throughout the decision-making and behavior completion process, and clear presentation of complex choices, particularly in the context of colorectal cancer screening. We conclude by noting gaps in knowledge and propose future research questions to guide this promising area of research and practice.

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Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Worplace health promotion
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Tobacco Worksite Policy and E-Cigarettes


Via M Dolores Solé Gómez
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Patient Digital Search Process | HealthWorks Collective

Patient Digital Search Process | HealthWorks Collective | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

It’s imperative that you consider the entire patient search process when devising your digital marketing strategy. Understanding each individual phase will allow you to hone your efforts and tailor your marketing to ultimately maximize ROI.

We want to know. And we want to know now. Gone are the days of anxiously waiting for a doctor to physically diagnose us. We see the slightest inkling of an unknown symptom and we hop online. Why wait, when we don’t have to?

Search is huge for the medical industry. Take a look at these stats from Google:

  • 77% of online health seekers say they began their last session at a search engine such as Google, Bing, or Yahoo
  • 72% of internet users say they looked online for health information within the past year
  • Behind using search engines and checking email, the #3 activity people do online is search for health information

The instant anyone suspects a symptom, they can turn to the web for more information. Obviously, this has led to an increase in the number of web users taking it upon themselves to diagnose their own symptoms and seek available treatments online.

There emerges a pattern in the way people search for health-related information. Each web user follows a similar patient search process while deciding if they need professional help. Understanding this path is invaluable to your healthcare marketing team. Although finding the ideal marketing balance between these four phases may take time, there are steps you can take right now to ensure that, at the very least, you’re engaging these searchers appropriately with your branded digital assets.


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Why use #hashtags in #healthcare campaigns?

Why use #hashtags in #healthcare campaigns? | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

Simply put, social media hashtags are designed to enable search on social channels. First coming to prominence on Twitter in 2007 in order to combat the short lifespan of a tweet, hashtags are used to identify a trending topic or specific subject so that interested people can find it, no matter where it appears in the tweet stream. And given that Twitter is all about conversation, hashtags also facilitate interaction between like-minded people with common interests.

What Twitter is so good at …is helping like-minded people across the world find, connect, converse and work with each other. The hashtag is the means by which much of this is achieved. Andrew Spong, PHD (Co-Founder of Health Care Social Media Europe #hcsmeu)

From a marketing perspective, where social media is considered the primary channel for communication, ensuring the visibility and longevity of a campaign or brand message can be a problem. The popularity of Twitter and its ‘real-time’ reporting, as well as the cumulative nature of following and tweet interaction produces a barrage of tweets. Today, an average of 8566 tweets per second were published on Twitter.

So how can a healthcare brand ensure its message is seen and heard? Repetition is one answer, but such a strategy carries with it the potential downside of alienating and losing brand advocates and followers. Advertising is another, but it has obvious cost implications. Using hashtags is not only more cost-effective, but also more productive in attracting and engaging with an interested audience, and in prolonging the lifespan of tweets and social posts. A study by Buddy Media found that using hashtags in tweets can double engagement[1].

A prime example of the importance of hashtag use within healthcare is the Healthcare Hashtag Project. Set up in 2010 by Symplur, this project aims to make the use of Twitter more accessible for providers and the healthcare community as a whole. The project maintains a database of relevant hashtags, and encourages submission of new hashtags in order to facilitate the exploration of healthcare subject matter on social media. Results to date are impressive. Its most famous healthcare hashtag, #hcsmeu, receives an average of 290k impressions in a single day.

Just as social media is transforming healthcare, hashtags are transforming healthcare marketing. Online community discussions, Tweetchats, real-time conversation, events, trending topics and much more are all powered by hashtags, not only on Twitter but also on other social channels.

- See more at: http://www.eurocomhealthcare.com/why-use-hashtags-in-healthcare-campaigns/#sthash.A1KFEs9X.dpuf


Via Plus91
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Research aims to reduce health care disparities.The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, queer/questioning and intersex (LGBTQI) population has been largely understudied by the medical ...

Research aims to reduce health care disparities.The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, queer/questioning and intersex (LGBTQI) population has been largely understudied by the medical ... | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, queer/questioning and intersex (LGBTQI) population has been largely understudied by the medical community. Researchers found that the LGBTQI community experience health disparities due to reduced access to health care and health insurance, coupled with being at an elevated risk for multiple types of cancer when compared to non-LGBTQI populations.
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Supercharge Your Social Impact: Using Social Marketing for Behavior Change -Nedra Weinreich

Supercharge Your Social Impact: Using Social Marketing for Behavior Change -Nedra Weinreich | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
'Supercharge Your Social Impact: Using Social Marketing for Behavior Change'-a free eBook to help nonprofits and public agencies with health & social change
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The Mental Health Effects Of Eating Too Much Sugar

The Mental Health Effects Of Eating Too Much Sugar | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

We know that too much sugar is bad for our waistlines and our heart health, but now there's mounting evidence that high levels of sugar consumption can also have a negative effect on brain health -- from cognitive function to psychological wellbeing.

While sugar is nothing to be too concerned about in small quantities, most of us are simply eating too much of it. The sweet stuff -- which also goes by names like glucose, fructose, honey and corn syrup -- is found in 74 percent of packaged foods in our supermarkets. And while the Word Health Organization recommends that only 5 percent of daily caloric intake come from sugar, the typical American diet is comprised of 13 percent calories from sugar.

“Many Americans eat about five times the amount of sugar they should consume,”Natasa Janicic-Kahric, an associate professor of medicine at Georgetown University Hospital, told The Washington Post.

It's easy to see how we can get hooked on sugar. However, we should be aware of the risks that a high-sugar diet poses for brain function and mental well-being.

Here's what you need to know about how overconsumption of sugar could wreak havoc on your brain.


Via Institute for Responsible Nutrition, Barbara Konitzer
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Institute for Responsible Nutrition's curator insight, April 6, 2:01 PM

We know that the overconsumption of sugar causes obesity and diabetes, but it also affects our mental wellbeing. 

Barbara Konitzer's curator insight, April 13, 3:12 PM

"It's a risk factor for age-related cognitive decline and dementia,

it may cause or contribute to depression and anxiety and
it impairs memory and learning skills"

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Association Between Apple Eaters and Physician Visits

Association Between Apple Eaters and Physician Visits | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
This cross-sectional observational study does not support that “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”; however, the small fraction of US adults who eat an apple a day do appear to use fewer prescription medications. See also the Editor’s Note by Redberg.

Via PatientView
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PatientView's curator insight, April 13, 6:28 AM

TX Jan for this ...lets hope its does not mean health apps 

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How Useful Are Screening Tests?

How Useful Are Screening Tests? | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Recently, bioethicist Ezekiel Emanuel, MD, PhD, MSc, of the University of Pennsylvania, stirred up some controversy by suggesting in the New York Times that yearly checkups are a waste of time (http://nyti.ms/193cv6J). As part of his argument, he cited a Cochrane Collaboration systematic review...
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How can we meet the healthcare needs of 9 billion people?

How can we meet the healthcare needs of 9 billion people? | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Healthcare systems around the world are facing a perfect storm of pressures and will not be able to cope unless we take a radical new approach, writes Rakesh Kapoor.
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Big Tobacco's deadly attack

Big Tobacco's deadly attack | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
The tobacco giant Philip Morris is suing Uruguay for having some of the best anti-smoking laws in the world, and there’s a good chance it could win, unless we strengthen the fight in court. 

It's a scary reality that one company, whose product kills, could overturn laws that protect our public health. But if our community's voices are brought into court by a world class legal team, we could fight back with a force no judge could ignore, showing how this sets an unacceptable precedent for the world. 

Let’s tell the court that this doesn’t just affect Uruguay -- if Big Tobacco gets their way it opens the door for challenges everywhere -- companies already have at least 4 other countries in their crosshairs, and many more have anti-smoking laws at risk. 

We have to move fast -- the court is already hearing arguments.Sign to protect our public health and our democracies from corporate greed -- each of our names will be submitted to the court.
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Osservatorio sui consumi privati in sanità. 21 aprile workshop community Ocps: Del Vecchio, Castaldo, Acconciamessa, Fattori, Palmarini, Mallarini

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Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Actualités monde de la santé
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Mais qu'est-ce que c'est un médecin de santé publique ?

Voici la question que l'on pose lorsqu'on en rencontre un. Cette vidéo brève et animée, destinée à tous les externes en formation, ou juste aux curieux, qui auront un début de réponse...

Via Virginie Lanlo, EVELYNE PIERRON
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Virginie Lanlo's curator insight, April 1, 7:53 AM

Vidéo animée très bien faite !

 

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Guadagnare Salute: Gli interventi di comunità per promuovere la salute dei cittadini”- Furio Honsell - YouTube

Sessione 2 - Comunità locali Relazione introduttiva della sessione: “Gli interventi di comunità per promuovere la salute dei cittadini” Furio Honsell - Sinda...
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The evidence base for school health promotion: the European perspective - Goof Buijs - YouTube

Sessione 1 - Contesto scolastico Relazione introduttiva della sessione: “The evidence base for school health promotion: the European perspective” Goof Buijs ...
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Social Marketing and Health Communication: From People to Places

Social Marketing and Health Communication: From People to Places | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

Many of the significant challenges we face in public health require that individuals change their behavior as part of the solution. Barriers to behavior change, whether known or unidentified, compound these challenges even more. As guest editors of this issue, we propose that the complementary use of social ecological theory and robust social marketing practice offers significant promise to overcome these impediments to improving the public's health.

We know that people make decisions—healthy or not—within the context of the social and cultural environment in which they live. If people cannot find a safe environment in which to exercise, they probably won't. If they cannot afford fresh fruits and vegetables, they can't eat them. If condoms are socially unacceptable, they won't be used. Social ecological theory is one important framework that offers insight into how and why these behaviors occur. The theory identifies multiple levels of influence (intrapersonal, interpersonal, social, environmental, and institutional)1 and employs a variety of disciplines and perspectives in an effort to understand and address complex public health problems.

Social marketing is an applied approach that fits well within this theoretical perspective. The approach uses strategies from commercial marketing, but focuses on how consumers interact with services and products that promote health. The fundamental axiom in social marketing is the notion of voluntary exchange: that individuals adopt products, ideas and behaviors from which they expect to benefit.2 The combined approaches of social marketing and social ecological theory focusing on people and places can result in stronger and more permanent behavior changes.

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Representations of minimum unit pricing for alcohol in UK newspapers: a case study of a public health policy debate

Representations of minimum unit pricing for alcohol in UK newspapers: a case study of a public health policy debate | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

Background Mass media influence public acceptability, and hence feasibility, of public health interventions. This study investigates newsprint constructions of the alcohol problem and minimum unit pricing (MUP).

Methods Quantitative content analysis of 901 articles about MUP published in 10 UK and Scottish newspapers between 2005 and 2012.

Results MUP was a high-profile issue, particularly in Scottish publications. Reporting increased steadily between 2008 and 2012, matching the growing status of the debate. The alcohol problem was widely acknowledged, often associated with youths, and portrayed as driven by cheap alcohol, supermarkets and drinking culture. Over-consumption was presented as a threat to health and social order. Appraisals of MUP were neutral, with supportiveness increasing slightly over time. Arguments focused on health impacts more frequently than more emotive perspectives or business interests. Health charities and the NHS were cited slightly more frequently than alcohol industry representatives.

Conclusion Emphases on efficacy, evidence and experts are positive signs for evidence-based policymaking. The high profile of MUP, along with growing support within articles, could reflect growing appetite for action on the alcohol problem. Representations of the problem as structurally driven might engender support for legislative solutions, although cultural explanations remain common.

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