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3 Things You Absolutely Must Know About ... - Health Promotion

3 Things You Absolutely Must Know About ... - Health Promotion | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Contact Info. MCCS Health Promotion Paige Fieldhouse Bldg #1110. Camp Pendleton, CA 92055. 760-763-3794/3793/0419 www.mccscp.com/health. Get A Wider Variety of Vegetables! » ...
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Health promotion. Social marketing
Health promotion: marketing sociale, comunicazione, salute, ambiente, disuguaglianze sociali.
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Social marketing guide for public health managers and practitioners - Edizione italiana- Parte 1

L’ European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) con “Social marketing guide for public health programme managers and practitioners” fornisce ai responsabili dei programmi di salute pubblica una sintesi dei principali concetti e approcci del marketing sociale nelle attività di prevenzione delle malattie e promozione della salute.

Il Marketing sociale è una disciplina che integra i concetti del marketing commerciale con altri tipi di approcci per influenzare i comportamenti a beneficio degli individui e delle comunità. 

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U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health

The United States is among the wealthiest nations in the world, but it is far from the healthiest. Although Americans’ life expectancy and health have improved over the past century, these gains have lagged behind those in other high-income countries. This health disadvantage prevails even though the United States spends far more per person on health care than any other nation. To gain a better understanding of this problem, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) asked the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine to convene a panel of experts to investigate potential reasons for the U.S. health disadvantage and to assess its larger implications. The panel’s findings are detailed in its report, U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health.

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Survey: Doctors and Patients See Benefits in Mobile Apps

Survey: Doctors and Patients See Benefits in Mobile Apps | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

Nearly half (46 percent) healthcare professionals say that they will introduce mobile apps to their practice in the next five year, according to the Plano, Tex.-based Research Now Group.

The survey included 500 healthcare professionals and 1,000 health app users in the U. S. Healthcare professionals were asked whether they currently use smartphone technology in their medical practice; whether they thought it was beneficial and for which types of patients; and under what conditions they thought it had the greatest potential. The health app users were asked which types of apps they use and how they feel about using smartphone technology in relation to their health.

The research found that 86 percent of healthcare professionals believe that health apps will increase their knowledge of patients' conditions. What’s more, 96 percent of users think that health apps help to improve their quality of life, and 72 percent of healthcare professionals believe that health apps will encourage patients to take more responsibility for their health.

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Les effets du tabac sur le fœtus vus par échographie 4D

Les effets du tabac sur le fœtus vus par échographie 4D | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Une étude britannique a suivi 20 femmes enceintes fumeuses. Des mouvements des foetus liés à la prise de tabac ont été observés. 
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An overview of prevention of multiple risk behaviour in adolescence and young adulthood

An overview of prevention of multiple risk behaviour in adolescence and young adulthood | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

The observed clustering, and shared underlying determinants, of risk behaviours in young people has led to the proposition that interventions should take a broader approach to risk behaviour prevention. In this review we synthesized the evidence on ‘what works’ to prevent multiple risk behaviour (focusing on tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use and sexual risk behaviour) for policy-makers, practitioners and academics. We aimed to identify promising intervention programmes and to give a narrative overview of the wider influences on risk behaviour, in order to help inform future intervention strategies and policies. The most promising programme approaches for reducing multiple risk behaviour simultaneously address multiple domains of risk and protective factors predictive of risk behaviour. These programmes seek to increase resilience and promote positive parental/family influences and/or healthy school environments supportive of positive social and emotional development. However, wider influences on risk behaviour, such as culture, media and social climate also need to be addressed through broader social policy change. Furthermore, the importance of positive experiences during transition periods of the child–youth–adult phase of the life course should be appropriately addressed within intervention programmes and broader policy change, to reduce marginalization, social exclusion and the vulnerability of young people during transition periods.

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Pour les médecins, l'activité physique n'est pas simple à prescrire - Doctissimo

Pour les médecins, l'activité physique n'est pas simple à prescrire - Doctissimo | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Les news Santé La pratique régulière d’une activité physique est bénéfique pour tous, y compris pour les personnes atteintes de maladies chroniques. Mais pour les professionnels de santé, sa prescr...

Via Marie Françoise de Roulhac
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Insignificant Data Cannot Yield Statistically Significant Conclusions—Reply

Insignificant Data Cannot Yield Statistically Significant Conclusions—Reply | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
In reply My coauthors and I appreciate the interest of Drs Engelman and Mattes in our recent publication on dietary sodium intake and risk of congestive heart failure.1 We agree with them on the limitations of dietary data from the NHANES I Epidemiologic Follow-up Study (NHEFS). However, we do...
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Promoting health and equity: a theme that is more relevant than ever

‘Promoting Health and Equity’ is the theme of the 22nd International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) World Conference on Health Promotion taking place in Curitiba, Brazil, on May 22–26, 2016 (1). Some may say that as themes go, this one is tired, even stale, and that we could have chosen something more contemporary and more in step with current challenges faced by health promotion, such as the impact of climate change or the role of emerging technology. To such contentions I would respond that at this time, there is no more pressing issue for health promotion than that of promoting equity. I offer three arguments in defence of this choice. Firstly, the social inequalities that underpin health inequity are not disappearing; they are growing. Secondly, while the promotion of health equity has achieved a certain level of popularity in the field of public health, commitment to addressing the issue remains fragile. Thirdly, the public health engagement toward addressing the social determinants of health is increasingly being called into question by governments – re-centring this fundamental objective is therefore a matter of survival.

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Integrating Cancer Control into Global Health

Many in the global health community have recently proposed that current efforts be expanded to include diseases typically associated with advanced economies, such as heart disease, mental health disorders, diabetes, and cancers. Here, we discuss ways in which the National Cancer Institute’s newly formed Center for Global Health plans to stem the rising cancer burden in developing countries.

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Adaptation of health promotion and disease prevention interventions fo migrant & ethnic minority populations: policy, practice and research

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Sudden cardiac death in athletes

The bottom line
  • Sudden cardiac death in athletes aged less than 35 years is most commonly caused by an underlying genetic heart disorder, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; however, up to half of all sudden cardiac deaths may be associated with a structurally normal heart at postmortem examination and are referred to as autopsy negative sudden unexplained deaths

  • Systematic and intense physical training can lead to changes in the heart; however, these are not always detrimental

  • Pathological changes to the heart caused by exercise may mimic characteristics of genetic heart diseases—for example, hypertrophy and fibrosis

  • There is much debate worldwide regarding the implementation and extent of preparticipation screening for athletes, with the main issue being the balance between lives saved; athletes tested; psychological, ethical, and legal issues; and the economic cost

  • Increased education and awareness about sudden cardiac death, training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and accessibility to automated external defibrillators can help prevent sudden cardiac death in athletes, as well as non-athletes

Sudden cardiac death is defined as an unexpected death, occurring usually within one hour from onset of symptoms in cases where the death is witnessed and in unwitnessed cases within 24 hours of the individual last being seen alive and well.1 Sudden cardiac death in athletes is the leading cause of medical death in this subgroup, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 50 000 to 1 in 80 000 athletes per year, although a wide range has been reported, from 1 in 3000 in some subpopulations to 1 in 1 000 000.2 Males, black or African Americans, and basketball players seem to be at a higher risk than other subgroups.

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Advertising’s toxic effect on eating and body image - Public Health

Advertising’s toxic effect on eating and body image - Public Health | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

March 18, 2015 — People often claim to ignore advertisements, but the messages are getting through on a subconscious level, pioneering author and ad critic Jean Kilbourne told an audience at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health on March 3, 2015. Kilbourne, best known for her groundbreaking documentary on images of women in the media,Killing Us Softly, went on to deconstruct the subconscious messages in food and body image-related advertisements and to describe how they create a “toxic cultural environment” that harms our relationship with what we eat.

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Research aims to reduce health care disparities.The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, queer/questioning and intersex (LGBTQI) population has been largely understudied by the medical ...

Research aims to reduce health care disparities.The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, queer/questioning and intersex (LGBTQI) population has been largely understudied by the medical ... | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, queer/questioning and intersex (LGBTQI) population has been largely understudied by the medical community. Researchers found that the LGBTQI community experience health disparities due to reduced access to health care and health insurance, coupled with being at an elevated risk for multiple types of cancer when compared to non-LGBTQI populations.
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Geographic Clustering Of Diabetic Lower-Extremity Amputations In Low-Income Regions Of California

Geographic Clustering Of Diabetic Lower-Extremity Amputations In Low-Income Regions Of California | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

For patients suffering from diabetes and other chronic conditions, a large body of work demonstrates income-related disparities in access to coordinated preventive care. Much less is known about associations between poverty and consequential negative health outcomes. Few studies have assessed geographic patterns that link household incomes to major preventable complications of chronic diseases. Using statewide facility discharge data for California in 2009, we identified 7,973 lower-extremity amputations in 6,828 adults with diabetes. We mapped amputations based on residential ZIP codes and used data from the Census Bureau to produce corresponding maps of poverty rates. Comparisons of the maps show amputation “hot spots” in lower-income urban and rural regions of California. Prevalence-adjusted amputation rates varied tenfold between high-income and low-income regions. Our analysis does not support detailed causal inferences. However, our method for mapping complication hot spots using public data sources may help target interventions to the communities most in need.

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“Apps” that harm patients will be hunted down, says regulator

A UK health regulator has issued a warning to makers of mobile medical “apps” that may harm patients.

Neil McGuire, clinical director of devices at the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) said, “Be under no illusion—if you have a medical device and it’s software or an app and patients come to grief, we’re coming looking.”

McGuire spoke at a health technologies seminar in London on 18 March attended by NHS and private sector representatives including device developers and designers. He was asked whether the United Kingdom and Europe would follow the US Food and Drug Administration’s lead in taking a supposedly “softer” line on certain classes of devices in guidance issued last …

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Communication Round Table: Social Marketing Approaches to Health Communication - YouTube

http://advanced.jhu.edu/academic/communication/roundtable/index.html Health communicators are increasingly using social marketing techniques to encourage peo...
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Socioeconomic Deprivation and the Incidence of 12 Cardiovascular Diseases in 1.9 Million Women and Men: Implications for Risk Prediction and Prevention

Socioeconomic Deprivation and the Incidence of 12 Cardiovascular Diseases in 1.9 Million Women and Men: Implications for Risk Prediction and Prevention | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Background Recent experimental evidence suggests that socioeconomic characteristics of neighbourhoods influence cardiovascular health, but observational studies which examine deprivation across a wide range of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are lacking. Methods Record-linkage cohort study of 1.93 million people to examine the association between small-area socioeconomic deprivation and 12 CVDs. Health records covered primary care, hospital admissions, a myocardial infarction registry and cause-specific mortality in England (CALIBER). Patients were aged ≥30 years and were initially free of CVD. Cox proportional hazard models stratified by general practice were used. Findings During a median follow-up of 5.5 years 114,859 people had one of 12 initial CVD presentations. In women the hazards of all CVDs except abdominal aortic aneurysm increased linearly with higher small-area socioeconomic deprivation (adjusted HR for most vs. least deprived ranged from 1.05, 95%CI 0.83–1.32 for abdominal aortic aneurysm to 1.55, 95%CI 1.42–1.70 for heart failure; I 2 = 81.9%, τ 2 = 0.01). In men heterogeneity was higher (HR ranged from 0.89, 95%CI 0.75–1.06 for cardiac arrest to 1.85, 95%CI 1.67–2.04 for peripheral arterial disease; I 2 = 96.0%, τ 2 = 0.06) and no association was observed with stable angina, sudden cardiac death, subarachnoid haemorrhage, transient ischaemic attack and abdominal aortic aneurysm. Lifetime risk difference between least and most deprived quintiles was most marked for peripheral arterial disease in women (4.3% least deprived, 5.8% most deprived) and men (4.6% least deprived, 7.8% in most deprived); but it was small or negligible for sudden cardiac death, transient ischaemic attack, abdominal aortic aneurysm and ischaemic and intracerebral haemorrhage, in both women and men. Conclusions Associations of small-area socioeconomic deprivation with 12 types of CVDs were heterogeneous, and in men absent for several diseases. Findings suggest that policies to reduce deprivation may impact more strongly on heart failure and peripheral arterial disease, and might be more effective in women.
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Text of the Women’s Health Protection Act of 2015

Text of the Women’s Health Protection Act of 2015 | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
(1)

Access to safe, legal abortion services is essential to women’s health and central to women’s ability to participate equally in the economic and social life of the United States.

(2)

Access to safe, legal abortion services has been hindered in the United States in various ways, including blockades of health care facilities and associated violence; restrictions on insurance coverage; restrictions on minors’ ability to obtain services; and requirements and restrictions that single out abortion providers and those seeking their services, and which do not further women’s health or the safety of abortion, but harm women by reducing the availability of services.

(3)

In the early 1990s, protests and blockades at health care facilities where abortions were performed, and associated violence, increased dramatically and reached crisis level, requiring Congressional action. Congress passed the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act (Public Law 103–259) to address that situation and ensure that women could physically access abortion services.


Via Heather Swift
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Dietary Sodium, Mortality, and Cardiovascular Risk

Dietary Sodium, Mortality, and Cardiovascular Risk | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Among a cohort of older adults in the Health ABC Study, this study finds that food frequency questionnaire–assessed sodium intake was not associated with 10-year mortality, incident cardiovascular disease, or incident heart failure.
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Cancer in global health: How do prevention and early detection strategies relate?

National cancer control plans are needed to stem the rapidly rising global cancer burden. Prevention and early detection are complementary but distinct strategies for cancer control. Some cancers are prevented through behavior and/or environmental modifications that reduce cancer risk, whereas other cancers are more amenable to treatment when they are successfully diagnosed at early stages. Prevention and early detection strategies should be prioritized on the basis of country-specific cancer demographics, modifiable risk factor distribution, and existing treatment resource availability. Following an individualized plan integrating prevention and early detection strategies, deficits can be targeted to strengthen national health systems for cancer control.

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Economic considerations and health in all policies initiatives: evidence from interviews with ...

Background Health in All Policies (HiAP) is a form of intersectoral action that aims to include the promotion of health in government initiatives across sectors. To date, there has been little study of economic considerations within the implementation of HiAP.Methods

As part of an ongoing program of research on the implementation of HiAP around the world, we examined how economic considerations influence the implementation of HiAP. By economic considerations we mean the cost and financial gain (or loss) of implementing a HiAP process or structure within government, or the cost and financial gain (or loss) of the policies that emerge from such a HiAP process or structure. We examined three jurisdictions: Sweden, Quebec and South Australia. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 12 to 14 key informants in each jurisdiction. Two investigators separately coded transcripts to identify relevant statements.

Results

Initial readings of transcripts led to the development of a coding framework for statements related to economic considerations. First, economic evaluations of HiAP are viewed as important for prompting HiAP and many forms of economic evaluation were considered. However, economic evaluations were often absent, informal, or incomplete. Second, funding for HiAP initiatives is important, but is less important than a high-level commitment to intersectoral collaboration. Furthermore, having multiple sources of funding of HiAP can be beneficial, if it increases participation across government, but can also be disadvantageous, if it exposes underlying tensions. Third, HiAP can also highlight the challenge of achieving both economic and social objectives.

Conclusions

Our results are useful for elaborating propositions for use in realist multiple explanatory case studies. First, we propose that economic considerations are currently used primarily as a method by health sectors to promote and legitimize HiAP to non-health sectors with the goal of securing resources for HiAP. Second, allocating resources and making funding decisions regarding HiAP are inherently political acts that reflect tensions within government sectors. This study contributes important insights into how intersectoral action works, how economic evaluations of HiAP might be structured, and how economic considerations can be used to both promote HiAP and to present barriers to implementation.


Via Doc-Ifsi-Narbonne, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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How losing your job can kill you in the world’s richest country- US healthcare

Healthcare should be a right, not a privilege, says Jennifer Corbelli, telling the story of a US woman born with HIV who died an untimely death after she could no longer afford antiretroviral treatment

“It’ll be fair before you die.” Of the many lessons I’ve learned from my oldest mentor, this is one of my favorites. It has endless applications, whether you’re dealing with a 4 year old or a 40 year old. Your brother ate the last cookie? Fair before you die. You’re working two Christmases in a row? Fair before you die.

This little adage never lets me down when confronted with someone’s off-base self pity. Or when, not uncommonly, I need to give myself a reminder to quit whining. I wish I could say the same when confronted with the harsh realities that so many patients face; once I walk into a patient’s room, it lets me down all the time.

In Melody’s case, it wasn’t fair even before she was born. She and her twin sister were born with HIV. Her mom and dad had HIV. Her older brother had …

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Un tema más actual que nunca: promover la salud y la equidad

“Promover la salud y la equidad”, éste es el tema de la 22ª Conferencia Mundial de la Unión Internacional de Promoción de la Salud y de Educación para la Salud (UIPES), que se celebrará en Curitiba, Brasil, del 22 al 26 de Mayo de 2016 (1). Algunos dirán que se trata de un tema usado, incluso trillado, y que podríamos haber elegido otro más contemporáneo y más vinculado a los retos actuales de la promoción de la salud, como el impacto del cambio climático o el rol de las nuevas tecnologías. A todos aquellos les respondería que no existe cuestión más actual para la promoción de la salud que la de promover la equidad. Tres razones argumentan a favor de esta opción. En primer lugar, las desigualdades sociales que constituyen la base de la falta de equidad en materia de salud no sólo no están desapareciendo, sino que aumentan. En segundo lugar, aunque la promoción de la equidad en materia de salud haya conocido una cierta popularidad en la salud pública, sigue siendo débil el compromiso para reducir las desigualdades sociales en este campo. En tercer lugar, cada vez más los gobiernos cuestionan este mandato que constituye el núcleo de la salud pública del siglo XXI: así pues, volverse a centrar en este objetivo fundamental es una cuestión de vida o muerte.

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Social welfare matters: A realist review of when, how, and why unemployment insurance impacts poverty and health

Abstract

The recent global recession and concurrent rise in job loss makes unemployment insurance (UI) increasingly important to smooth patterns of consumption and keep households from experiencing extreme material poverty. In this paper, we undertake a realist review to produce a critical understanding of how and why UI policies impact on poverty and health in different welfare state contexts between 2000 and 2013. We relied on literature and expert interviews to generate an initial theory and set of propositions about how UI might alleviate poverty and mental distress. We then systematically located and synthesized peer-review studies to glean supportive or contradictory evidence for our initial propositions. Poverty and psychological distress, among unemployed and even the employed, are impacted by generosity of UI in terms of eligibility, duration and wage replacement levels. Though unemployment benefits are not intended to compensate fully for a loss of earnings, generous UI programs can moderate harmful consequences of unemployment.

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9 Mistakes Doctors Make On Social Media

9 Mistakes Doctors Make On Social Media | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

Social media can take your career to the next level, but these commonly seen mistakes will hold you down. Make sure you know how to avoid them.

In the digitally driven world we live in today, businesses across all industries are constantly seeking more modern techniques to market their services to an evolving community. For doctors, one of the most powerful tools to help do so has been social media. These social platforms give doctors a digital resource that allows them to communicate, build relationships, and acquire patients.

  


  

Although social media has been around for a number of years now, many doctors are still not trained well enough to adequately utilize its capabilities. Social media can be a tremendously influential tool that allows you to connect with your patients both organically and non-organically, but it can also be detrimental to your career if you do not use it the right way. Because most blunders you make on social media will be visible to the public, they can potentially cost you money, patients, and your reputation. Deteriorating your reputation has never been a good thing, but with more people using the Internet to find a doctor than ever before, the importance of building a positive online reputation has never been greater.

  

There are many common mistakes you’ll see doctors make on social media. Whether you’re just beginning to build your online profile or have been doing so for years, it’s important to learn from the mistakes of others so that you can avoid them yourself.

  

Here are some of the more common mistakes doctors make on social media:

  

Not having a strategy in place

The #1 reason people don’t get the results they wanted for from their social media account is the fact that they never had a clear plan on how to use it. In order for social media to play a beneficial role for you or your practice, it’s crucial to have a strategy in place that aligns why you’re using it with what you hope to get out of it. Creating an account on a social media website and blindly posting without any specific intentions is unlikely to generate positive results. Make sure you are familiar with the etiquette and customs of the specific platform you are using. Know your target audience and produce content that they will be interested in, thus increasing the likelihood they will engage in conversation with you. Take the time to set clear goals and objectives that can be measured to determine how successful they are. There is nothing wrong with adjusting your plan as you go, but it’s absolutely essential to establish some sort of a strategy to steer your social media efforts in a direction that will lead to positive results.

  

Shying away from conversation

The whole point of social media is to provide a platform where you can interact with others. Social media is not a blog or an advertisement. There are certainly aspects of it that share similar functions as these, but more than anything social media is about creating an online community where you can connect with others. It’s not a one-way relationship where you push out information, but are unwilling engage in conversation and listen to feedback – even if that feedback is negative. Responding to positive feedback is easy, but one of the hardest things to do on social media is responding to negative reviews. Even if you cannot mend the relationship with the patient who left a bad review, responding to their concerns in a public forum shows prospective patients that you take your craft seriously and care about their health. The biggest component in creating a community is engaging with the community that you are creating. If the overarching goal of your social media strategy is to create more patients, then you simply cannot be a social media robot. You need to emit a more personal touch that allows them to build a better relationship and become comfortable with you. It’s human nature for people to be more drawn to someone who listens to them and shows an interest in what they have to say. Show them that you are a real person – show them that you care.

  

Over-promoting

This goes back to the point that social media channels are geared to promote conversations, not advertisements. Creating a social media profile strictly for self-promotional purposes won’t do you any good. A general rule of thumb is to go with an 80/20 split – meaning no more than 20% of your posts should be directly promotional. When people are scrolling through their news feed, they want to see things that are interesting and valuable to their life, not yours. They don’t want to incessantly hear about the benefits of your practice and what you can supposedly offer them. You cannot force yourself or your practice upon them – it won’t work. Instead, acquire new patients by focusing on developing relationships and earning their trust over the long run.

  

Focusing on quantity over quality

It’s easy to get caught up in the numbers and sacrifice quality in favor of quantity when building your social media pages. Yes, there’s value in having a lot of friends or followers, but not when it jeopardizes the validity of your online reputation. There are a number of programs out there that allow you to pay for friends, followers, likes, etc., but buying your way into forming a perception that you’re more popular than you actually are is not a good idea. Not because it’s immoral or inaccurate (which it is), but because it’s a waste of money. There is no value in your posts when the people seeing them are not even real people. On top of that, when real patients are able to see that the majority of people following you are actually bots, your credibility is diminished.

  

Another area where focusing on quantity over quality can come back to harm you is the frequency in which you post. Obviously, you need to post often enough that your able to build a following, but you don’t want to bombard your audience by posting so often that it gets to the point where they deliberately ignore your posts. When you make the quantity of your posts a top priority, you unknowingly create less creative and engaging content, consequently reducing the effectiveness of your posts. How often you should post depends on the social network you are using, your target market, and your social media strategy. The general rule though is to post as often as possible to the point where you are not sacrificing the quality of your content.

  

Not managing time and resources

Managing your time wisely is absolutely vital when it comes a career as time-consuming as being a doctor. You want to be as efficient as possible when conducting your social media endeavors, thus freeing up more time throughout the day to be spent on other matters. There are many ways to do so, but most doctors make the mistake of either not knowing about, or not taking advantage of these resources available to them. There are several comprehensive social media management tools, Sproutand Hootsuite being two of the favorites, which allow you to control almost all aspects of your social profile from one easy-to-use location. These tools allow you to schedule posts ahead of time, which saves you a lot of time spent sharing posts throughout the day. This also allows you to schedule posts duringideal hours of the day. However, do make sure that you are not relying solely on these automated posts and forget to the whole meaning of social media in the first place – interaction! Another mistake many doctors make is constantly running to the join the latest and greatest social network and abandoning platforms that they had previously been using. There are dozens of social networks that doctors should be on, and more sprout up every week. There’s nothing wrong with joining additional social networks, but it shouldn’t be at the detriment of the platforms that you have already established a community with. You cannot join too many social networks that it gets to the point where you don’t have the time and manpower to manage each one of them. Use your time and resources wisely.

  

Unreasonable expectations

If you begin your journey into social media with the expectation that you’ll see immediate results, you’ll surely be disappointed. You’ll often hear the old adage, “it’s a marathon, not a sprint,” in regards to dealing with social media for your practice. While it may be corny, it’s entirely accurate. Remember, you’re trying to build relationships with these people. Naturally, doing this takes time, even more so when you’re doing it online. You can’t get discouraged when you aren’t seeing much of a return on your investment overnight. When you design your social media strategy, understand that you need to be in it for the long haul if you hope to benefit from your efforts.

  

Not setting up bio and profile picture correctly

In social media, your profile is your first impression. You are able to build relationships by the way you communicate with people, but your profile sets the tone that allows that relationship to build in the first place. It all starts with your profile picture – don’t make the mistake of thinking this doesn’t matter. This is the first thing that others will see on your profile and is something they’ll associate with you from there on. Having a lackadaisical or unprofessional picture isn’t exactly the initial image you want to represent you. Aside from the picture, also ensure that your bio is properly written. They need to know whom you are and what you do, but don’t overload them with unnecessary information. Your bio will vary depending on the particular social media platform you are using. However, generally your bio should be informative, yet concise.

  

Not knowing the line between personal and professional

If there’s one aspect of social media that is most responsible for a large number of doctors shying away from using it at all, it’s the fear of it leading to legal actions against them. This fear is certainly justifiable, there are certain components of your career – patient confidentiality for example – that absolutely cannot be discussed on a public forum environment created by social media channels. Not knowing the boundary between what is ethically acceptable and unacceptable is a mistake that can indeed lead to dire consequences. However, that shouldn’t stop you from using social media, it should motivate you to understand where the line should be drawn in order to avoid negative ramifications.

  

Not using it

Plain and simple: the biggest mistake doctor’s make in regards to social media is neglecting to use it. There are a variety of opportunities at one’s disposal through social networks that otherwise would not be obtainable. The possibilities are endless – as long as you avoid a few common mistakes.



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