Health promotion....
Follow
Find
5.7K views | +15 today
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
onto Health promotion. Social marketing
Scoop.it!

An ethnographic approach to understanding the place of leisure time physical activity in 'working class' British culture: Implications for social marketing - UWE Research Repository

An ethnographic approach to understanding the place of leisure time physical activity in 'working class' British culture: Implications for social marketing - UWE Research Repository | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

Physical activity has a well understood set of benefits. UK leisure time physical activity (LTPA) is socially patterned, with lower socio-economic groups participating less. There is evidence from the literature that in addition to structural causes, there may be a ‘working class’ worldview of LTPA, which strongly influences their lack of participation.

more...
No comment yet.
Health promotion. Social marketing
Health promotion: marketing sociale, comunicazione, salute, ambiente, disuguaglianze sociali.
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from FIASO
Scoop.it!

eHealth Promotion: Social media "Patient included"

#e-HealthPromotion: social media “Patient included” Giuseppe Fattori Laboratorio promozione della salute: organizzazione, nuovi media, indicatori.


Via Giuseppe Fattori
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Contraception On A Chip: Is It Secure?

Contraception On A Chip: Is It Secure? | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
An implanted chip could give women the power to wirelessly control their own fertility, bringing contraception to millions of women in developing countries and reducing infant m...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Actualités monde de la santé
Scoop.it!

Cartoons, Comedy, and Cancer in 1952

Cartoons, Comedy, and Cancer in 1952 | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Circulating Now welcomes Guest Blogger David Cantor. Dr. Cantor has published on the histories of cancer, meat, medical film, and the after-life of Hippocrates, the father of medicine. His most rec...

Via EVELYNE PIERRON
more...
EVELYNE PIERRON's curator insight, Today, 12:11 PM

When in 1952 the American Cancer Society (ACS) released the movie Man Alive!, it was trying something new. For the first time an educational short about cancer combined cartoons and comedy.

Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

What’s the Difference? Does Gender Matter When Communicating About Health? - Health Literacy

What’s the Difference? Does Gender Matter When Communicating About Health? - Health Literacy | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Health Literacy Consulting saves health professionals the time and expense of misunderstanding. Now, more than ever, patients and providers need to communicate in ways that are clear, simple, and understandable. This is not only a matter of good clinical care, but also required for accreditation and patient satisfaction. Health Literacy Consulting offers workshops, consultations, and writing and editing services that improve health care communication.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

«Amici sportivi, buon pomeriggio…»

«Amici sportivi, buon pomeriggio…» | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Non c’è trasmissione che tenga, neppure quelle a contenuto sportivo: la televisione favorisce pessime abitudini alimentari, sovrappeso, obesità e sedentarietà. E allontana da una vita (realmente) attiva.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

How social media impacts public health

How social media impacts public health | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it


Given how prevalent social media is nowadays, it's not surprising that some have used it for public health purposes. However, the capabilities reach far beyond raising awareness about health issues. Novel applications of social media that have impacted public health include emergency response and epidemic tracking.

Nonetheless, as easy as it might be to disseminate good information, there is little that can be done to screen for inaccuracies. And, unfortunately, some of these inaccuracies can lead to adverse health and financial outcomes.

Here's a look at major public health initiatives in which social media is making an impact.

1. Flu tracking through social media
Studies have shown that social media can be used to accurately estimate flu prevalence when compared to the CDC-ILINet (Influenza-like Illness Network) tracking system. University of Pennsylvania researchers also detailed in a New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) article that after tweeting the location where flu vaccines were offered, the VA Health Department noted a surge in vaccinations. Similarly, when public figures like Barbadian singer Rihanna tweeted about the flu, searches for "flu" spiked.

Researchers also looked into sentiment toward the 2009 H1N1/09 vaccine. Of 470,000 tweets collected, 318,000 were relevant, 256,000 were of neutral opinion, 35,000 were positive, and 26,000 were negative. They demonstrated that for those who had positive or negative sentiments, information spread in a manner that geographically clustered. As a result, some communities were at risk for diminished herd immunity. Identification of such pockets could allow resources to be targeted to these areas.

One study looked at misconceptions about the flu and antibiotics by searching keywords: 345 status updates reaching 175,000 followers used "flu" and "antibiotics" incorrectly together and 305 status updates reaching 850,000 followers used "cold" and "antibiotics" incorrectly together. Misuse of "leftover" or "shared" antibiotics were also examined.

2. Promoting behavior through social media
Patients, advocacy groups and companies alike have used social media to deliver certain messages to the public. The Dove "Evolution" campaign went viral and helped bring to light how magazine covers and advertisements place an unrealistic standard on beauty. As expected, other groups have used social media to educate and raise awareness about a wide variety of health issues from breast cancer and healthcare policy to safer sex and smoking cessation.

When people voice their opinions on a public forum, potentially hazardous public health effects may follow. More recently, the anti-vaccination movement promoted by several high-profile public figures caused alarm among public health experts. What's even more worrisome is how these views spread across country borders. One study attributes 26,000 cases of measles in the past year in Europe to social media influence.

3. Emergency response and Ushahidi
Ushahidi, meaning "witness" in Swahili, was a social media platform that originated in Mogadishu but was key to emergency response following the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Mobile providers in Haiti opened access to the platform, which allowed those reporting emergencies (fires, missing people, contaminated water, infectious diseases, food shortages, theft, roadblocks, floods, etc.) to be linked to help. Further upstream, resource providers were linked the resource suppliers. GPS location also made it easier for relief organizations to reach areas in need. In addition, the technology reportedly helped crowdsource the most detailed roadmap in Haiti to date with 1.4 million edits at the time. The mobile provider Digicel also noted how 630,000 people were displaced out of Haitian capital Port-au-Prince, which helped track a cholera outbreak.

4. Medical Journals on Twitter
Several studies have looked at how medical and scientific journals share their content on Twitter. He findings indicate that 3,725 out of 3,812 journals have Twitter accounts, including high-impact publications such as Nature, Science, NEJM and The Lancet. Between 2010 and 2012, 9.4 percent (or 135,000) of 1.4 million journal articles were posted on Twitter. NEJM for instance tweeted nearly half (48 percent) of their 1,580 papers during that period.

However, popularity on Twitter doesn't seem to necessarily translate to how frequently cited or how scientifically robust the paper is. In fact, popular papers may be more pertinent to current events. The top two most highly-tweeted papers were papers from PNAS related to the Fukushima disaster and nuclear contamination. Similarly, journals that tweet more aren't necessarily the most cited either.

5. Social media as a research tool
As mentioned earlier, social media content has been used to track flu epidemics and highlight misconceptions about antibiotics.  Various researchers are looking into both "primary data" (directly asking the public a question on social media and gathering responses) and "secondary data" (analyzing the content of tweets). As social media becomes more recognized as a source of data, developing metrics will more efficiently and accurately measure its content. Beyond the scientific focus of medicine, linguistic studies are also being conducted to examine how storytelling can be used as a coping mechanism for cancer survivors on social media sites.


Via Plus91
more...
jenii brain's curator insight, Today, 9:44 AM

try this...

Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Health Care Harnesses Social Media - US News

Health Care Harnesses Social Media - US News | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
More and more doctors and nurses are using Facebook, Twitter and other platforms to interact with - and monitor - their patients.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Open Data & Health: food for thoughts

La presentazione portata all'evento Open Sanità per stimolare in circa 20 minuti spunti e riflessioni sulla salute, open data, spunti da alcuni paesi europei e…
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Shared Decision Making
Scoop.it!

Decision Aids for Chest Pain: How much is too much information? - Ed in the ED

Decision Aids for Chest Pain: How much is too much information? - Ed in the ED | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Shared decision making and decision aids for chest pain, the future for low-risk chest pain care? http://t.co/U9DpPCAitp

Via Informed Medical Decisions Foundation
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

CT scans to find lung cancer in smokers When you need them—and when you don’t

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

When to say ‘Whoa!’ to doctors. A guide to common tests and treatments you probably don’t need

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

DON'T LET THE TRUTH GET IN THE WAY OF A GOOD STORY: AN ILLUSTRATION OF CITATION BIAS IN EPIDEMIOLOGIC RESEARCH

DON'T LET THE TRUTH GET IN THE WAY OF A GOOD STORY: AN ILLUSTRATION OF CITATION BIAS IN EPIDEMIOLOGIC RESEARCH | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

The production of scientific knowledge is susceptible to bias at every stage of the process, from what questions are asked by the investigator, to which method is chose to gather data, to which analyses are conducted (e.g., “P-hacking,” wherein the method of statistical analysis and the degrees of freedom are manipulated until they yield statistically significant results) (1). Even after completion of a study, authors sometimes choose not to submit their work for publication because they are not satisfied with the results (i.e., the “file drawer” problem) (1), or they encounter difficulties with getting results published because of reviewer or editorial bias (“publication bias”) (24).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Canadian Cardiovascular Societ Five Things Physicians and Patients Should Question - Choosing Wisely Canada

Canadian Cardiovascular Societ Five Things Physicians and Patients Should Question - Choosing Wisely Canada | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Don’t perform stress cardiac imaging or advanced non-invasive imaging in the initial evaluation of patients without cardiac symptoms unless high-risk markers are present.

Asymptomatic, low-risk patients account for up to 45 percent of unnecessary “screening”. Testing should be performed only when the following findings are present: diabetes in patients older than 40-years-old; peripheral arterial disease; or greater than 2 percent yearly risk for coronary heart disease events.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Patient Education DVDs now available at an online store

Patient Education DVDs now available at an online store | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

Diabetes Patient Education Simplified!

 

P.E.A.S™  - India's first exhaustive patient education DVD library now available at our online store. 

 

Medically Accurate, High Definition Animated Videos related to Diabetes available in Indian regional languages viz. Hindi, Gujarati, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Bengali.

 


Via Parag Vora, nrip
more...
nrip's curator insight, Today, 8:40 AM

Excellent use of technology (eCommerce) to bring Patient Education and Awareness into the limelight. I checked out this link and found something for each specialization.  Hope to see more and more of such examples in the coming months.

Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Modern Aesthetics | What Does Social Media Participation Mean for Patients’ Privacy?

Modern Aesthetics | What Does Social Media Participation Mean for Patients’ Privacy? | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
In an increasingly public digital world, how do doctors safely interact with patients online while protecting the latter’s privacy?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Semantic Sphere
Scoop.it!

Humanité digitalisée, entreprise augmentée | Sciences Po ./ formation continue

Humanité digitalisée, entreprise augmentée | Sciences Po ./ formation continue | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

Via Pierre Levy
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Balla che ti passa: più equilibrio e benessere con la danza

Balla che ti passa: più equilibrio e benessere con la danza | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Migliora la stabilità, fa bene al cuore e funge da analgesico naturale. Ballare giova a tutti, ma soprattutto agli anziani.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Generation X: America’s neglected ‘middle child’

Generation X: America’s neglected ‘middle child’ | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Generation X has a gripe with pulse takers, zeitgeist keepers, and population counters like me. We keep squeezing them out of the frame.
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Chintan Jain
Scoop.it!

Find out which type of Social Media sharer are you?

Find out which type of Social Media sharer are you? | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Major list of social networking sites on powerful social media platforms by using various social media sharers to promote content on social sharing exchange
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Spunti tra Linked Data, Open Innovation, Crowdsourcing e Semantic Med…

Presentazione portata a Sci(bzaar)net, con spunti su come creare community basandosi su tecnologie gia' presenti del Linked Data, per rispondere a bisogni di …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

The BMJ Today: Choosing Wisely makes me happy

The BMJ Today: Choosing Wisely makes me happy | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Sometimes we all need cheering up on a Monday morning, and today I couldn't recommend more highly this parody of “Happy” by Pharrell W
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Santé et Hôpitaux "AutreMent"
Scoop.it!

Enfants et ordinateurs : quelle protection ?

Enfants et ordinateurs : quelle protection ? | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Vous pensez peut-être que votre ordinateur et les données que vous stockez dedans ne sont pas importantes et nécessitent uniquement une protection de base, c’est à dire, les fonctionnalités déjà intégrées à votre système d’exploitation.

Via L'Info Autrement
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Pharma Hub
Scoop.it!

Cancer du sein métastatique et qualité de vie : Unicancer et Roche lancent une base de données

Cancer du sein métastatique et qualité de vie : Unicancer et Roche lancent une base de données | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

Fondation reconnue d’utilité publique, l’Institut Curie associe l'un des plus grands centres de recherche européens en cancérologie et deux établissements hospitaliers de pointe.


Via catherine cerisey, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Emmanuel Capitaine , Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

India will make 50 essential drugs available free of charge - bmj

Fifty essential drugs are to be made available to the entire population of India free of charge, the Indian government has announced.

The government argues that the list of 50 drugs will be sufficient to deal with three quarters of most people’s medical needs and will enable it to negotiate pricing deals during procurement and provide more than a third more drugs for the same amount of money. The list includes analgesics, antibiotics, antihypertensives, and antidiabetes drugs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Prevention of chronic disease in the 21st century: elimination of the leading preventable causes of premature death and disability in the USA : The Lancet

Prevention of chronic disease in the 21st century: elimination of the leading preventable causes of premature death and disability in the USA. By - Ursula E Bauer PhD, Peter A Briss MD, Dr Richard ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Bone-density tests: When you need them—and when you don’t | Choosing Wisely Canada

Bone-density tests: When you need them—and when you don’t | Choosing Wisely Canada | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

A bone-density test is a way to measure the strength of your bones. The test, called a DEXA scan, is a kind of X-ray. Many people get a bone-density test every few years. The main reason to have the test is to find and treat serious bone loss, called osteoporosis, and prevent fractures and disability. Most men and women under age 65 probably don’t need the test because ..........

more...
No comment yet.